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Powder coating

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savarin

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#1
does anyone know if powder coating is resistant to cutting fluids?
Two fluids I use have removed all the chinesium paint from my 9x20 every where its splashed.
Also would any of the castings warp in the heat of the powder coating oven?
Thanks
 

kd4gij

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#2
Powder should hold up fine. The parts should not warp in the oven.
 

Cadillac

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#3
Yes powder coating should hold up to cutting fluids. Casting warping their is a possibility of stress relief which can do anything. If your thinking of powder coating your lathe. I think it would be a lot easier to strip and do acouple coats of oil based rustoleum paint. Very durable
 

dlane

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#4
Take the rest of the paint off , polish and oil it :big grin:
 

RandyM

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#5
The only fluid that I have found to effect powder coats is Acetone and even then it will not strip it. It only softens it for a short period.

Bear in mind, some powders are more resistant than others to fluid types. There are many compositions of powder all with specific application in mind.
 

savarin

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#6
sounds like its worth a go when I strip it and adjust everything where I've flogged it so relentlessly.
 

derf

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#7
I've been powder coating the parts on my SB 9A project. Seems to be working good. The only thing I can't coat is what I can't get into my oven...the bed and the stand, so I will find some paint to match. As Randy said, acetone will dissolve powder coat and so will carb cleaner. Acetone doesn't work as fast because it evaporates faster. If you need to strip off powder coat, I use the carb cleaner in a method. You soak a rag in carb cleaner and wrap it around the part, then put the whole works in a plastic bag so it doesn't evaporate. In about 20 minutes the powder coat will peel off like grape skin.
 

RandyM

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#8
I've been powder coating the parts on my SB 9A project. Seems to be working good. The only thing I can't coat is what I can't get into my oven...the bed and the stand, so I will find some paint to match. As Randy said, acetone will dissolve powder coat and so will carb cleaner. Acetone doesn't work as fast because it evaporates faster. If you need to strip off powder coat, I use the carb cleaner in a method. You soak a rag in carb cleaner and wrap it around the part, then put the whole works in a plastic bag so it doesn't evaporate. In about 20 minutes the powder coat will peel off like grape skin.
Thanks Derf, I didn't know that. :encourage:
 

savarin

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#9
Most carb cleaners seem to be predominately acetone, toluene and methylethyl ketone so no wonder it removes paint and softens the plastics in powder coating. At least we dont see benzene these days.
 

derf

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#10
Here's what I've got done so far...
DSC02537.JPG DSC02538.JPG
DSC02539.JPG

A few tips: spend some time to smooth up the castings, the slicker they are, the slicker they will turn out. Make sure the castings are oil free, if your not sure, pre-bake them to cook out all the oil and grease and blow the powder on while they are hot. If you don't have any silicone plugs to mask off holes, use a wad of aluminum foil. I found that the cheap ol' manilla colored masking tape works well as it almost falls off coming out of the oven. To clean up the goo left behind, use WD-40 and some #0000 steel wool.
 

savarin

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#11
Gee, they look really nice
 

RandyM

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#12
Here's what I've got done so far...
A few tips: spend some time to smooth up the castings, the slicker they are, the slicker they will turn out. Make sure the castings are oil free, if your not sure, pre-bake them to cook out all the oil and grease and blow the powder on while they are hot. If you don't have any silicone plugs to mask off holes, use a wad of aluminum foil. I found that the cheap ol' manilla colored masking tape works well as it almost falls off coming out of the oven. To clean up the goo left behind, use WD-40 and some #0000 steel wool.
Derf, Looks like you have been doing this for a little while. This is exactly how I do it. :encourage:

You do nice work!

Interesting on the standard masking tape. I had not tried that trick yet. I have been using the high heat stuff. Thanks.
 

Bi11Hudson

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#13
Some food for thought:
Trichloroethane(1,1,1,Tech) has been outlawed for years, justifiably so. I do miss it though, in certain applications and still have some on the shelf, although it requires some seriously careful handling. Been using it since the sixties, so a little more exposure ain't gonna kill me much sooner..... And, it does clean metal and removes oils deep in the pores of a casting for painting, &c. There is still nothing to compare.

I bring this up for a couple of reasons.
First off, the really good Tap Magic, the kind no longer available, has this as a component. As well as some other shop fluids that are NLA. But for us old timers, there may still be some on the shelf.
Secondly, there is NO paint, or any other finish, that will stand up to it. If it will turn aluminium to powder, paint doesn't stand a chance. Even powder coating.

Please understand, I am not denigrating the project, by any means. But if you do have some of this on the shelf, painted surfaces are a has-been. I have a Grizzly from the '90s, a G1550 9X20. Tiawanese, rather than mainland China. As good as the paint is, there are places on the headstock where there isn't any. So I'm sloppy when I'm rushed, big deal. The point is, if there is any of this stuff around, the paint isn't.

For what it's worth, when Tap Magic was taken off the shelf, I had a friend sold me several cans. Of the old stuff. Because it works, well. The new stuff don't.

Bill Hudson​
 

Downunder Bob

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#14
does anyone know if powder coating is resistant to cutting fluids?
Two fluids I use have removed all the chinesium paint from my 9x20 every where its splashed.
Also would any of the castings warp in the heat of the powder coating oven?
Thanks
I have to ask what cutting fluid you using.

I don't think I'd risk the warping, It may not happen, but if it does you're stuck with it. Chinese castings A bit like their paint. I'd use a decent enamel.
 

extropic

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#15
Here's what I've got done so far...
View attachment 267955 View attachment 267956
View attachment 267957

A few tips: spend some time to smooth up the castings, the slicker they are, the slicker they will turn out. Make sure the castings are oil free, if your not sure, pre-bake them to cook out all the oil and grease and blow the powder on while they are hot. If you don't have any silicone plugs to mask off holes, use a wad of aluminum foil. I found that the cheap ol' manilla colored masking tape works well as it almost falls off coming out of the oven. To clean up the goo left behind, use WD-40 and some #0000 steel wool.
Those parts look great.

I'm wondering if you used any "Bondo" type filler anywhere?

My question is, will powder coating over Bondo come out well?
 

derf

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#16
Bondo is not compatible with the heat, it will simply fall off. But there is a filler that is just for powder coating, it's called "Lab Metal". It's very similar to the old lacquer spot putty but it has metal fillers in it. I did use it in one spot on the cross slide where someone ran it in to the chuck and left some deep gouges. It seems to fill very solidly, but it does not feather out well around the edges. DSC02540.JPG

These gouges were about 1/16" deep, and although with the filler they didn't totally dissappear, it looks better than they were. If I was to get particular and do a blemish free job, I would simply wet sand and coat again just like you would do with paint. The biggest thing is just sanding down all the sand cast bumps and irregularities. Once in a while you might find an inclusion in the casting that will just have to be filled because it is too deep to grind out.
 

derf

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#17
Start to finish: cruddy dirty, degreased, polished, and finally coated.
DSC02541.JPG
DSC02542.JPG
DSC02543.JPG
DSC02544.JPG
 

extropic

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#18
WOW! Looks great.
 

RJSakowski

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#19
Some food for thought:
Trichloroethane(1,1,1,Tech) has been outlawed for years, justifiably so. I do miss it though, in certain applications and still have some on the shelf, although it requires some seriously careful handling. Been using it since the sixties, so a little more exposure ain't gonna kill me much sooner..... And, it does clean metal and removes oils deep in the pores of a casting for painting, &c. There is still nothing to compare.

I bring this up for a couple of reasons.
First off, the really good Tap Magic, the kind no longer available, has this as a component. As well as some other shop fluids that are NLA. But for us old timers, there may still be some on the shelf.
Secondly, there is NO paint, or any other finish, that will stand up to it. If it will turn aluminium to powder, paint doesn't stand a chance. Even powder coating.

Please understand, I am not denigrating the project, by any means. But if you do have some of this on the shelf, painted surfaces are a has-been. I have a Grizzly from the '90s, a G1550 9X20. Tiawanese, rather than mainland China. As good as the paint is, there are places on the headstock where there isn't any. So I'm sloppy when I'm rushed, big deal. The point is, if there is any of this stuff around, the paint isn't.

For what it's worth, when Tap Magic was taken off the shelf, I had a friend sold me several cans. Of the old stuff. Because it works, well. The new stuff don't.

Bill Hudson​
I believe the chemical in Tapmatic was trichloroethylene. It really was a great tapping fluid. It made a sizzling sound as I was tapping. I made the mistake of using on aluminum once and smoke spiraled up from the tapped hole.

I used to buy trichloroethylene by the gallon from an industrial chemical supply house for degreasing. It was deemed a carcinogen and no longer available so I switched to trichloroethane but that was not nearly as effective. Both were eventually banned for being involved in ozone depletion.
 

dlane

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#20
I like the polished look, I think they make clear powder, but the lit blue looks good.
 

RandyM

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#21
I like the polished look, I think they make clear powder, but the lit blue looks good.
Yes, clear is available.
 

derf

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#22
The name of that color is Squirrel gray, RAL#7000. It does seem to have a slight blue twinge to it when compared to Rustoleum smoke gray.
 
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