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Ryobi Dp-100 Drill Press Mod Using Treadmill Dc Motor

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eldata

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#1
Hi guys, new to this forum and site. Been working on this project since last month and am wondering whether treadmill motor conversions are still of interest in machining forums. If so, would this be the right forum to post something like this?

Here's a video (excuse the poor quality) of me testing the feasibility of integrating a tachometer with the MC-70 controller without needing an extra power supply. Also, I'm using the same sensor taken from the treadmill;

 

47convertible

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#2
I've been down the same road with both drill press and 10-inch lathe for something over a year now and the experience is mixed. I started out with a DC motor/controller from an inexpensive home treadmill. I say go for it. If it doesn't work out as hoped you have some experience on what not to do. My first motor from the inexpensive treadmill was a 'beer can' type that looked similar to yours except I didn't use the flywheel. It made its highest power at well over 4500 rpm which was not very useful for a drill press or lathe without gearing way down. Lesson learned, for me at least, is to get your treadmill motors from professional grade treadmills with enough grunt and quality to take years of every day, all day use.
I then sourced a DC treadmill motor from a higher grade (gym) treadmill that made its two horsepower at 3450 rpm. Big improvement and its in use on my 17 inch Jet drill press for drilling. I did keep step pulleys to be able to gear within narrower rpm range but I haven't had to change belt except a few times on 3/4 and larger bits.
So my experience with DC treadmill motors on a drill press is mixed but I am keeping the 17 inch Jet with its DC motor and controller as it does most everything I need for day to day drilling. Meanwhile I'm saving up for a decent quality mill as I'm getting more and more into hobby machining and like the ability to do precision work.
Jerry
 

eldata

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#3
I have more faith in the motor than the controller in my case. But cutting 4.5" holes in sheet metal, mainly aluminum, is probably the most demanding load this press will ever see. Minimum RPM was over 500 RPM with the stock AC motor and lowest pulley combo, resulting in stalls, squeals and premature wear of the circular saw. Also, hadn't used the treadmill in around eight years, it was just folded upright gathering rust and dust but still worked fine when tried for the last time before pulling it apart.

There's a Sieg X2 mini-mill here too, converted for CNC, but don't like using it for cutting large holes and it's too much trouble to mill them due to its small size. Nevertheless, it's my main drilling machine and was invaluable in milling parts for the drill press mod. Here it is using a 3/8" two flute end mill to create slots in the new motor base;

 

FanMan

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#5
I picked up a broken treadmill a few days ago. The base is broken, but the motor and controls are intact. Motor is labelled 2.65HP / 1940W. Controller is a MC-2100. The plan is to use it to replace the 1HP AC motor on my Jet 15 mill/drill. I tested it tonight before ripping everything apart, motor turns ~6000 rpm at the treadmill setting of 10mph. Plan is to make a simple 555 based PWM control circuit to control the motor controller, and keep the existing step pulley setup on the mill, though I'm hoping leaving at 2:1 reduction will work for most things. I'll start a thread in the appropriate section as things progress.
 

eldata

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I picked up a broken treadmill a few days ago. The base is broken, but the motor and controls are intact. Motor is labelled 2.65HP / 1940W. Controller is a MC-2100. The plan is to use it to replace the 1HP AC motor on my Jet 15 mill/drill. I tested it tonight before ripping everything apart, motor turns ~6000 rpm at the treadmill setting of 10mph. Plan is to make a simple 555 based PWM control circuit to control the motor controller, and keep the existing step pulley setup on the mill, though I'm hoping leaving at 2:1 reduction will work for most things. I'll start a thread in the appropriate section as things progress.
Go for it, you're bound to learn/experience something new. Invention may be necessity's brightest child but it's not the only one, furthermore, she has relatives (if you get my drift). Heck, I hadn't turned or bored a taper before working on my conversion.

Just yesterday I was faced with using pan head machine screws because the same thread flat head ones were too short. Since this was 1/4" aluminum, counterboring was feasible for a better finish but the head diameter was .27" and my nearest end mills were 1/4" and 3/8". Before giving up on counterboring, I did some internet research on milling circles and counterbores and voila!...Six lines of G-Code;

;Counterbore .30" hole .1" deep using 1/4" end mill
;1/4" end mill at X0,Y0,Z0
;X0, Y0 is at center of predrilled hole for thread diameter
;Z0 is just resting on surface
;.025=(.3-.25)/2

G01 X-.025 F1
G01 Z-.1
G02 I.025 F.5
G00 Z0
G00 X0 Y0
M30

Man, am I glad for not having the right size end mill and the flat head screws were too short.
 

eldata

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#7
Drilling enclosure (currently in 2D state) for MC-70 controller;


Completed enclosure will eventually be attached to the side of the drill press head assembly.
 
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eldata

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#8
Control panel sans cover and proof of mounting concept;

DSC_9424.jpg
DSC_9446.jpg
DSC_9436.jpg
DSC_9443.jpg
 

eldata

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#9
Wired and completed control panel;

DSC_9451.jpg
DSC_9455.jpg
DSC_9460.jpg
 
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