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Sheldon Cm 56

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Bamban

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#1
Saw this in a local CL. It looks rigid for its size. You guys have any experience with theseach lathes. Could this possibly be used to cut tenon, thread and chamber a barrel feeding with the turret? Never seen a turret lathe to have any opinion on precision and repeatability. Can't seem to find any information anywhere about this particular one.


20161226_155841.jpg 20161226_155847.jpg 20161228_185724.jpg
 

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Bob Korves

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#2
Well, that one has a lead screw, which most do not. That would sure make it more versatile. It is still short and does not have a tailstock, so no work between centers, though the turret will be able to partially substitute for the tailstock. If you are doing barrel work, the spindle hole size will be an important question.
 

Bamban

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#3
Thanks, Bob. I was thinking just tenon work only. I can do the contouring on the 1236 or even the 1024 for shorter barrels. You are right the bore diameter must be established.
 
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#4
Has D-1 4" spindle mount which means it has a 1-3/8" spindle thru bore. Sheldon like many other machine tool manufactures built special purpose lathes for doing certain operations like this one is set up to do. Serial number puts it in the early to mid 1960's.
 
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Also notice the turret looks very familiar to the Harlingen style that uses the bolt on tool holders. If it is, tooling is available.
 

Bamban

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4GSR,

Thank you. In their new condition aee turret lathes typically used for precision work?
 
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4GSR,

Thank you. In their new condition aee turret lathes typically used for precision work?
They can do precision work. I won't say it would be as good as a real Hardinge would be, but close!
I notice the lathe has a gap cut out on the bed. I wonder if that is original or someone did that over the years. I don't recall ever seeing that in any of the Sheldon literature I have or on the Sheldon yahoo group. Might be worthwhile to post that over on the Sheldon yahoo group. Old John Knox may know something about that lathe. Ken.

Edit: One thing I forgot to mention. The handwheels used on this lathe were the ones found only on the R series lathes, which were made in the 13, 15, and 17 in swings. Be nice if you could get some more pictures and post. Ken
 

Bob Korves

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Nez, I have John York's email if you need it. Ulma Doctor does as well. John is very knowledgeable from living machining for quite a few decades, and his knowledge is on a really wide swath of subjects from a wide range of experience. He is also a member on this group, user name benmychree, but I don't know how often he logs on.
 

Bamban

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#9
I am trying to arrange a trip to San Antonio to look at the lathe. Waiting on the seller's response.

Thank you all for the help, I should have more questions once I get to see the machine.

I am fascinated with turret lathes, if they were precise and repeatable enough, I would think they would make excellent dedicated lathe for barrel tenon work; turning, threading, drillIing, boring, and finish chambering.
 
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Just now realized you're close to me. If you need a second opinion and someone else to take a look at the lathe, let me know, I'll be glad to go out of my way to help. There's no way I'll be able to do anything this week, but maybe the following week or even on a weekend. Just send me a PM. Ken
 
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Everyone, I found a picture of this exact same lathe on the back cover of a Sheldon Lathe brochure. They refer to it as a "Hand Chucking Lathe". The copyright of the brochure is 1965. I don't have a late catalog on Sheldon that would give details on this particular lathe. If I find something, I'll post it. Ken
 

Bamban

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#12
Ken,

We just got back from SA TX. The atheist pretty solid and stout little lathe. The current ownerating are in the race car business. They never used this lathe for any precision work, but in their own words it works well. Unfortunately, the phase converter went with the mill they just sold, we were not able to power it. Stuck an old indicator they had on the set thru plate of the chuck, at least it was turned nicely. Feeler running on that dirty chuck shows hardly any runout. No bearing play pushing on the chuck. The spindle spins nicely, not real quite, but no grinding noise. The turret locks solidly with hard tugging. The turning dial was locked out of the way and they no idea what it is for. I had to wipe out the dinterview to expose the dial. From what I can feel on the ways there is no discernible wear nor visible gouges. The 5C collet closer was never used.

Here are some pictures.
 

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Bamban

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#13
More pictures
 

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Bamban

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More pictures.

Ken, Do turrets have a lock down system that locates the turret to spindle centerline front to back, or the centerline has to be dialed it. Once dialed in, what would stop it from slightly moving.

This has a power drive in both directions, but it looks like it has only a lead screw.

What do you think I should offer the seller. He is moving the shop this Saturday, he has the motivation to sell since they are are downsizing shop at another location.
 

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Ulma Doctor

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#15
:drool:
 

Bamban

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#16
How much should I offer the seller that I won't insult him.
 

Bob Korves

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#17
How about "I don't know what these go for or what you are thinking you should get for it, but $xxx.00 is what it is worth to me."
 

Ulma Doctor

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#18
i'd offer $1250 and see if he balked

if you get it, i can build a converter for you pretty cheap
good luck :grin:
 

Bamban

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#19
Thanks, y'all.

The first time I turned those balanced crank handles on both the turret cross slide and apron, I was impressed, that thing felt heavy, but very smooth. Never had the opportunity to even turn a handle on a good Ameican iron.

The manual claims the turret indexing is "50 millionth" Is that the catch word back back then? I remember reading the 10EE advertises "millionth" in their bearing spec instead of decimal representation.

The spindle free wheels so easily, is tjat normal for tapared roller bearing system. My 1236 and 1024 surely do not?

I will make him an offer.
 

mksj

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#20
You might offer less (like $750) and than have an upper limit. It does not look like it has been used in awhile, there is dust mixed with grease on the moving surfaces, gearbox etc. Maybe used for some simple drilling/turning, as there is no other holders mounted on the turret. Seems like everything else has been picked over and this is what remains, very limited number of people that I think would be interested in this type of lathe. He may be just happy to get something as opposed to nothing and dragging it somewhere else to sit.
Mark
 

Bamban

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#21
Mark,

He is motivated to sell. Thanks.

More machines to the orphanage,.....

I am getting more work to do muzzle threading for flash hiders and courtesy devices, I am hopeful this would suffice at leat for these jobs; simple facing, turning, and theading that I can leave the cutters in place after initial setup. Of course a dedicated chambering set up is ideal, but will settle for just muzzle threading. It has a 5C closer and I have a full set of Lynden collects, the lathe should be good for some other small piece repetitive work.

Be nice to own an American iron

Nez
 
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Bamban

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#22
Gents,

I got it for 8 and a chambering job. Will pick it up tomorrow. It will be fun running this lathe. Another learning to do.

Nez
 

Bamban

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#23
Screenshot_20170119-223847.png I found a page in their 1960s sales brochure. It looks like the CM56 has some nice spec.
 
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#24
Bambam,

my apology for not tuning earlier, I've been on the road most of the week, just now reading the thread. I think you got a sweet deal for 8 Franklins! I'm not real familiar with that turret setup, but I bet that was purchased from Hardinge and adapted to the lathe. If that is so, that setup is equivalent to a HV model Hardinge lathe. At least I think it is. Others can correct me on this if I'm wrong. It is air operated. When indexed, the turret is slightly lifted, indexed, and set back down and locked in place. Compressed air is used to keep stray stuff from getting up under the turret. The turret is fixed to the centerline of the spindle. I doubt there is any way of adjusting it. But, the bolt on tool holders should give you a way to adjust for sideway alignment.

Ken

EDIT: Correction on my post above. The turret has cross slide movement. It is not fixed as I noted above. As for a stop to put you on center, I bet there is a stop that can be set for that.
Also make sure you get the 5C collet piece that fits in the headstock spindle. Its shown in the picture sitting in the chip pan under the QCGB.

Ken
 
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