Show Us Your Shop Made Tooling!

Bob a Job

Registered
Registered
Joined
Sep 1, 2011
Messages
6
Re: Shop made tooling

Thanks for the compliments lads .

Hi Phil ,,,,,,,, To tell the truth i have no idea what make of coolant it is ,,, being a tight arse i had scrounged a gallon of the neat coolant from a local engineering company. next time i will ask . It is water soluble and a strange blue colour .




BJ
 

8ntsane

Active User
Registered
Joined
Dec 1, 2010
Messages
1,172
Re: Shop made tooling

Etard

That would be a nice project build. For his intended use, it would be very handy. Ive allways wanted some type of easy access to rounding over parts, Though I,d need a bigger one. That video gives me some good idea,s.
Thanks for posting that ;)
 

rickard

Moderator
Registered
Joined
May 4, 2012
Messages
121
Re: Shop made tooling

Etard, That is so Kool I'm going to Blatantly Rip that guy off and copy that rotary table :) in 1/2 scale for my Unimat DB
 

PurpLev

Active User
Registered
Joined
Feb 22, 2012
Messages
924
Re: Shop made tooling

Sharon, on your endmill holders, can they be used in a R8 collet or is that too much mass?

Charley - sorry I missed your Q a while back....

these endmill holders all use a 3/4" shank which fits and being held inside an R8 3/4" collet, so no need to completely remove the drawbar and replace collet/holder -just slight release, pull holder out, push new one in, and tighten. I saw someone using a hydrolic drawbar release which made this even sweeter.... but I'm not 'there' yet.

Edit:
added some pics showing how it mounts flush:
IMG_20120712_213540.jpg
IMG_20120712_213641.jpg

IMG_20120712_213540.jpg IMG_20120712_213641.jpg
 
Last edited:

8ntsane

Active User
Registered
Joined
Dec 1, 2010
Messages
1,172
Re: Shop made tooling

Being Ive been slacking off posting around here, and have a fly cutter in progress, I will try to post up a pic or two. Its a 1 inch thick X 8 inch OD, mounted to a R-8 boring head arbour. I still have the machining to take the tooling, but as said, its in progress.



2012-04-13 14.06.17_1.jpg
 

8ntsane

Active User
Registered
Joined
Dec 1, 2010
Messages
1,172
Shawn
Nice Job
30 min of your time, but your going to have yrs of use, thats the best thing about making your own tools.
 

flutedchamber

Active User
Registered
Joined
Sep 13, 2011
Messages
272
Re: Shop made tooling

A tapper turning attachment i made .

BJ

Very nice work. I've seen taper attachments from the factory that are less sturdy and professional looking. A few questions if you will.

How to you tighten the bolts that attach the taper attachment to the cross slide? I can't tell by the photo. It appears to be a T nut and an socket head capscrew?

How long of a taper can you cut with that?

Thanks.
 

wawoodman

himself, himself
Registered
Joined
Mar 19, 2011
Messages
937
Re: Shop made tooling

here are a few I posted here in my albums:

a quick-rough-dialing-in attachment to the QCTP:

Great work. Could somebody please explain how this is used?

There was another thread with the bearing on the end of a shaft, and how that could be used as an edge finder. I've already got the bearings to make one. But I'm intrigued by the dialing-in aspect on the lathe. Do you use it to bump an off center spinning shaft until it stops wobbling, and then bring up the tail stock? So I guess the chuck should be snug, but not tight? Low speed, so it doesn't go whipping across the shop? (I could probably experiment, but this has the potential of hurting me, so I'd rather ask!)
 
Last edited by a moderator:

PurpLev

Active User
Registered
Joined
Feb 22, 2012
Messages
924
Re: Shop made tooling

Great work. Could somebody please explain how this is used?

There was another thread with the bearing on the end of a shaft, and how that could be used as an edge finder. I've already got the bearings to make one. But I'm intrigued by the dialing-in aspect on the lathe. Do you use it to bump an off center spinning shaft until it stops wobbling, and then bring up the tail stock? So I guess the chuck should be snug, but not tight? Low speed, so it doesn't go whipping across the shop? (I could probably experiment, but this has the potential of hurting me, so I'd rather ask!)

yup, you got the right idea. chuck snug, but not fully tightened, then you bring the toolpost to the (lightly) wobbly part until it comes in contact, then give it a bit of a nudge to bring it closer to turning on center then tighten the chuck for actual work.
 

8ntsane

Active User
Registered
Joined
Dec 1, 2010
Messages
1,172
Mike
They are very handy when you are trying to get a work piece to turn with min runout as possible. Very usefull when tying to get a thin disc to run straight, or a piece that seems to wobble around, and you need to loosen the chuck and try it again.

To use, set the lathe on a very low speed, just lightly snug the work piece in the chuck. The bearing should be brought up to the wobbling part, and as you apply presure, the work piece will start to run straight. Once you have it at a reasonable run out, check with your indicater. If your happy with it, tighten the work piece, and re check to make sure.

If your carefull, you can use this tool to quickly assist you to get the min run out possible. Just remember, lightly snug the work piece, you need the bearing to push it into alignment. Slow RPM, and dont forget to tighten the chuck before you start cutting.

A real usefull tool to get the work running as true as possible, before the cutting begins. Many times will bring the run out with in a few thou.
 
It can take up to an hour for ads to appear on the page. See our code implementation guide for more details. If you already have Auto ad code on your pages there's no need to replace it with this code
Top
AdBlock Detected

We get it, advertisements are annoying!

Sure, ad-blocking software does a great job at blocking ads, but it also blocks useful features of our website. For the best site experience please disable your AdBlocker.

I've Disabled AdBlock