• PHISHING SCAM attempt TARGETING HOBBY-MACHINIST members. It has been brought to our attention that a pop-up survey is soliciting userfeedback from H-M members. In exchange for survey information, the user is given an opportunity to win a prize if they pay for shipping charges. This is NOT a Hobby Machinist program, survey or contest. DO NOT click through the links. Close your browser immediately and restart your computer. Clear cookies, cache and log back into Hobby Machinist. Again, this is NOT a Hobby Machinist contest or survey - IT IS a PHISHING SCAM attempt to get your credit card information.To close this notification, click the "X" in the top right corner of this box.

Atlas 7B Disassembly and Teardown! Pic Heavy!

Weldo

H-M Supporter - Gold Member
H-M Supporter Gold Member
Joined
Sep 7, 2019
Messages
498
Heyo! I've not found a good resource for this subject so I'm gonna try my hand at supplying some info to the community.

Backstory, I got an Atlas 7B just a few weeks ago and upon close inspection it appears someone had lubed it all up with heavy grease as opposed to the recommended No. 10 or 20 oil. So in the interest of keeping this thing in top shape I want to disassemble it as much as possible and give it a good cleaning/lubing before I start to use it. After all machines like this will become more and more rare as time rolls on so I think we in the hobby have a duty to preserve them as best we can. I don't really think of this machine as "mine", rather I am its current steward. Someday, God willing, some other person will enjoy it for many years to come.

On to the greasy stuff!

The following pics are the state of the machine as received.

Under the grease cup on the right side (as viewed by the operator) of the pinion shaft someone had pressed in a zerk fitting thus rendering the grease cup useless.

EM520930.JPG



This may seem to be an upgrade at first but as I found out on my Atlas lathe countershaft, the temptation when using a zerk and grease gun is to apply much more grease than necessary. Even one pump of the gun is many times more than needed. A grease cup should be turned about one full turn each time the machine is used. This meters out a very small amount of grease, just enough to squeeze a little fresh lube into the bearings. This zerk will be removed and lubing will be handled by the grease cup.

EM520001.JPG



This is the opposite side of the same pinion shaft. It should have a grease cup similar to the pulley side. The cup has been replaced with a zerk. Based on the huge globs of grease inside the machine it is evident that too much grease has been pumped in.

EM520004.JPG


A closer look. This fitting will be replaced with a grease cup that has 1/8"- 27 NPT threads. Again, a single turn of the cup each time the machine is used will supply adequate fresh grease.

EM520005.JPG



Next, the manual calls this part the "Neck and outer bearings" for the large crank gear inside the machine column. This too should be an oil cup and lubed with No. 10 oil. Here you can see it packed with grease.

EM520003.JPG


This grease must be flushed out.

EM520002.JPG



In this pic we can see grease applied to the ram. On my machine there was a zerk fitting on the left side ram slide and just an open hole on the right. The factory spec for this is again light oil, the idea being that the ram will "float" on a film of oil like a car's crankshaft and connecting rod bearings. The ram will be removed and cleaned and lubed with oil.

EM520929.JPG



Finally here are several shots of the internal parts inside the column. The column casting houses the main crank mechanism. Oil is spec'd for all these parts with the exception of the gear teeth. The gear teeth are recommended to be occasionally coated with a small amount of "graphite gear grease".

EM520007.JPG




EM520008.JPG




EM520009.JPG




EM520010.JPG



The amount of grease inside the machine is excessive and will be thoroughly cleaned out. As mentioned before all the parts inside the column are to be lubed with No. 10 motor oil or equivalent.

The grease used through-out this machine may not technically be bad for it but it does have a few negative aspects. One drawback of grease is the lack of cleanliness in operation. Any machine in which grease is so heavily used will inevitably leave your hands, clothes and tools also coated in grease. Grease will collect dust and grit more so than oil. Because it is so sticky it is not easy to flush out debris from grease coated parts like it is with oil. Since oil is relatively thin and fluid, any accumulated dust and tiny chips can be flushed out with liberal application of more oil. The excess it then wiped up and a clean machine is obtained.

So this is the start of my journey into the Atlas 7B! Stick around, I'll be posting lots more pics and detailed tear down info in the coming days/weeks. Hopefully this will help future hobbyists!
 

Weldo

H-M Supporter - Gold Member
H-M Supporter Gold Member
Joined
Sep 7, 2019
Messages
498
First up, Ram removal! Due to the length of the process this will be broken up into a few different posts.

Let's get dirty!

First remove the ram adjusting handle. You will have to remove the oil cup first to allow the handle to thread off the stud.

EM520002.JPG


EM520001.JPG



Inside the casting are two slotted screws. Remove them as well.

EM520003.JPG



Now the block can be removed.

EM520004.JPG


EM520005.JPG



The next most obvious thing is the ram guides. They hold the ram in its channel. The bolts are 1/2". That hole you see is where one of the zerk fittings was. It should be an oil cup.

EM520007.JPG



Atlas seemed to make extensive use of serrated lock washers.

EM520008.JPG



All bolts removed. The round head screw in the bar just holds a light bulb bracket. It can stay in place.

EM520009.JPG



The hold down bar is lifted up and we find a stack of very thin shims. The manual says this is a stack of shims consisting of four 0.002" leaves and two 0.001" leaves, so 0.010" total. Thus adjustment can be made in 0.001" increments to account for wear of the ram or its ways. If play in the ram appears worse than the spec'd 0.001-0.002", a shim can be removed to allow the hold down bar to clamp the ram more tightly.

EM520010.JPG



Next the bolts for the right side are loosened.

EM520011.JPG



And we can see the shim stack for the right side.

EM520012.JPG
 

Weldo

H-M Supporter - Gold Member
H-M Supporter Gold Member
Joined
Sep 7, 2019
Messages
498
Now the felts and wipers must be removed. There are two slotted screws in each one.

EM520013.JPG


EM520014.JPG



Felts and wipers removed. In this pic we can also clearly see the adjusting gib for the ram.

EM520015.JPG



The right side wiper revealed a broken screw. The lower screw is broken off in the hole, the sharp break snagging some felt. I may attempt to remove it but it's probably not critical.

EM520016.JPG



At this point the ram can be lifted from its ways. There was significant suction holding it down due to the grease. In the pic it is propped up on a cedar shim.

EM520017.JPG



Another view of the underside of the ram from the front. There's still some linkages holding it to the machine.

EM520018.JPG



It appears that the ram adjusting rod must be freed somehow in order to remove the ram completely. The ram adjusting rod runs parallel with the ram inside the ram. It's a small Acme thread like the one on a lathe cross slide. We can see it in the above picture running through the block in the center of the ram. This rod is the means by which the ram position is adjusted.

Before the rod can be removed be sure to turn the square key at the rear of the ram such that the cast iron block into which the adjusting rod is threaded is somewhere in the middle of its travel. If the block it all the way towards the front of the ram, there will not be enough room to allow the rod to be separated from the ram. This will be important later.

We'll start by removing the lock nuts at the rear of the ram.

EM520020.JPG


EM520019.JPG



Behind the two nuts is a brass washer.

EM520021.JPG



The next part took me a while to figure out. There is affixed to the threaded rod a bevel gear. This gear is pinned to the threaded rod with a solid pin and must be removed in order to separate the ram from the linkage underneath. The trick is to use a small punch and tap out the pin through the oil hole at the rear of the ram. Let the ram overhang the column to the rear and turn the threaded rod until the pin is lined up vertically with the oil hole on top of the ram.

EM520022.JPG



The pin taps out fairly easily. Be careful it doesn't hit the floor and go missing!

EM520023.JPG
 
Last edited:

Weldo

H-M Supporter - Gold Member
H-M Supporter Gold Member
Joined
Sep 7, 2019
Messages
498
This is where it is important that the cast iron block was moved to about the middle of its travel on the adjusting rod. It the block is located all the way to the front of the ram there will not be enough clearance for the rod to be tapped forward within the ram. The block will hit the front end of the adjusting slot in the ram.

Now that the bevel gear is unpinned from the threaded ram adjusting rod we can tap the rod toward the front of the machine. The pic is just for illustrative purposes, in actuality I used a wood block between the hammer and rod. Protect those threads!


EM520025.JPG



Here the rod is pushed all the way through the ram.

EM520026.JPG



After passing through the ram enough the rod drops out of the way. Light can be seen from the other side of the hole.

EM520027.JPG



At this point you can reach underneath the ram and slide the bevel gear off the threaded rod.

EM520028.JPG



This is the bevel gear and its pin.

EM520029.JPG



Now the ram can finally be removed. You lift straight up and you may have to move it to the rear a bit to disengage the threaded rod from it's bore. What's left is the linkage with a threaded rod and the cast iron block still attached.

EM520030.JPG



Hopefully it's clear from this pic why the cast iron block has to be placed toward the middle/rear of its travel. You must tap the rod a few inches toward the front of the machine to get the rod to clear its bore in the ram. The slot in the top of the ram will limit how far the block can move.

EM520032.JPG



Another view.

EM520031.JPG
 

Weldo

H-M Supporter - Gold Member
H-M Supporter Gold Member
Joined
Sep 7, 2019
Messages
498
Now to remove the block and rod.

There's a set screw that holds the large pivot pin firmly in place. 1/8" allen.

EM520033.JPG



Remove it all the way. Just backing off slightly is not enough since there is a flat spot milled into the pin for the set screw. If you only back it out a 1/2 turn or so the screw will catch the shoulder of the flat spot.

EM520034.JPG



The pin was tight on my machine so I used a brass drift to tap it out.

EM520035.JPG



I then had to prop up the linkage to allow room for the pin to pass by the ways. A small wood block was used.

EM520036.JPG



Try not to let the pin fall to the floor, roll under a table, disappear for a few minutes and get covered in saw dust and spider webs.

EM520037.JPG



The ram position adjusting rod and block can now be removed.

EM520038.JPG



The following pics show the bevel gear that mates with the one on the adjusting rod.

Here it is on the underside of the ram.

EM520039.JPG



The collar on the top side must be removed via a set screw.

EM520024.JPG



Then the gear can be passed through and out from the bottom.

EM520040.JPG



That's all I got done so far. Stay tuned!
 

Weldo

H-M Supporter - Gold Member
H-M Supporter Gold Member
Joined
Sep 7, 2019
Messages
498
Oh! More info! Thanks man!

To be clear this thread is certainly not meant to be a definitive work on the proper disassembly of this machine. This thread is just how I managed to muddle through the process. There are probably better ways to do everything I attempt!
 

frugalguido

H-M Supporter - Gold Member
H-M Supporter Gold Member
Joined
Jun 27, 2016
Messages
133
Great job on the photo disassembly. I am still not sure about the oil gitt in the "Neck and outer bearings" assembly, it has two taper bearings, I packed them with grease at the time of reassembly. I did install a new gitt oiler, but have still not put oil in there. I am not sure how oil would get to the bearings in the first place, it is a pretty good distance between the bearings and oiler is in the center space between them. To me it didn't make sense, they grease the back bearings, but not the main bearing and it's turning a lot slower speed. When you think about it, it is a lot like front wheel bearing in a car, two tapered bearing with a place between them. Also grease is a lot better these days than in the past, so don't turn the grease caps as much as was recommend by Atlas. I did talk to a friend that was an application engineer for Chevon, he recommend a grease that would do the job. But, I over oil the thing, especially the sliding block and the ram. I also modified the oiling groves on the ram ways, gib, sliding block for better oiling placement.
 

ErichKeane

Making scrap at ludicrous speed.
H-M Supporter Gold Member
Joined
Aug 3, 2017
Messages
783
Oh wow, thats great!

I'm actually surprised about the ZERK on the pinion 'other' side (side with the door) isn't original. Mine 7B is basically factory-original with the exception of that (and the missing oil cup on the other side). I've now ordered _2_ of the oil cups from your last thread, I guess I'll be replacing both :)
 

ErichKeane

Making scrap at ludicrous speed.
H-M Supporter Gold Member
Joined
Aug 3, 2017
Messages
783
But, I over oil the thing, especially the sliding block and the ram. I also modified the oiling groves on the ram ways, gib, sliding block for better oiling placement.
Same here :) My shaper looks like a crime-scene with Vactra2 instead of blood. I basically hose down anything/everything with oil whenever I use it.
 

frugalguido

H-M Supporter - Gold Member
H-M Supporter Gold Member
Joined
Jun 27, 2016
Messages
133
The oiling on this shaper has to be done constantly, its a oil lost system. That is why a South Bend is better in this sense, they have an oil sump and a pump in the later models. My Atlas was in bad shape when I got it from lack of oiling, I think it was used in a school, thus the optional motor protector, in case a student jammed it.
 

ThinWoodsman

Registered
Registered
Joined
Jul 8, 2018
Messages
737
This is motivating me to finally get around to working on the (Ammco) shaper.

It ain't broke, but I have some mods I want to make that require removing the knee. Hopefully I can do that with just the apron removed and the ram slid all the way back. I plan to drill and tap holes in the apron and the knee for DRO mounts and a semi-permanent indicator mount (apron only).
 

Weldo

H-M Supporter - Gold Member
H-M Supporter Gold Member
Joined
Sep 7, 2019
Messages
498
Thanks guys! I got some more done today. The crank arm has been removed as well as most of the feed gears and their housing. The pinion shaft is giving me trouble though. I think I have to remove the big crank gear before the pinion shaft will come out.

Here's how I got the crank arm out.

First I removed the plate on the crank arm. Four slotted screws

EM520074.JPG


EM520075.JPG



The plate also has pins that located it on the crank arm. It took a little prying and wiggling to get it free.

EM520076.JPG


EM520077.JPG



Next the block is removed from the slot in the crank arm and the large pin on the crank gear.

EM520078.JPG


EM520079.JPG



According to the manual there should be a spacer behind the block, as pictured below. I seem to be missing that spacer.

Missing Piece.jpg



Here you can see a trough machined into the top of the block. I believe the idea is that you squirt oil through the hole in the flat plate that was removed a moment ago and the oil pools into this trough in the block, metering out a little oil at a time during operation.

EM520080.JPG



For the following steps the machine must be accessed from underneath.

EM520089.JPG
 

Weldo

H-M Supporter - Gold Member
H-M Supporter Gold Member
Joined
Sep 7, 2019
Messages
498
Now we get a peek at the filthy under carriage!

Here's what it looks like before any more parts are removed.

EM520091.JPG



There are three set screws to remove in order for the shaft to slide out. Two are in collars that set the shaft side to side in the machine and one is in the crank arm.

Collar.

EM520092.JPG



Crank arm. The manual says there should be a lock washer and jam nut on this set screw. There's even a boss on the casting for it.

EM520093.JPG



Collar.

EM520094.JPG



I removed all three completely, just to be safe. 1/8" Allen.

EM520095.JPG



Now the shaft is tapped through the column. It drove pretty easily for me.

EM520096.JPG



Almost there!

EM520097.JPG



Aaaaaaannnnnddd Yahtzee!

EM520098.JPG



All the collars and shaft removed. Set screws reinstalled to avoid losing.

EM520099.JPG



And here's the arm. I don't think I need to disassemble the last link, I'll just clean it up.

EM520100.JPG



Or maybe I will pull it apart. I've come this far!

EM520101.JPG



All that's left inside the column is the large crank gear and the pinion shaft. Like I mentioned earlier the pinion shaft is putting up a bit of a fight. It's got a tapered roller bearing on each end that seems to be tightly pressed onto the shaft and races that are more lightly pressed into the column. There's also some collars and the pinion gear affixed to the shaft with solid pins. I got some of the parts freed up but it looks like if I remove the crank gear first the pinion shaft will come out with its bearings and collars still on the shaft. I'll try to get pics when I get to that part.
 
Last edited:

ThinWoodsman

Registered
Registered
Joined
Jul 8, 2018
Messages
737
Try not to let the pin fall to the floor, roll under a table, disappear for a few minutes and get covered in saw dust and spider webs.
We call that "dust blueing".

Pretty interesting seeing what differs from the Ammco. Going to see about getting the knee off today, which means dismantling the ratchet mechanism.

UPDATE: Well, that was easy. Ratchet mechanism is a T-nut, with a screw-and-washer as a stop. Slid right out, intact. Ran the table all the way out (to the left) to expose the leadscrew nut for the knee; with the knee as low as it could go, Removed the two SC screws holding the knee to the nut. Had to remove the wipers and the knee lock (the tommy bars comes right out with a drift), then loosened the gib and the knee lifted right off. The knee is now sitting on a board on the mill table, begging me not to do any lasting damage.
 
Last edited:

Weldo

H-M Supporter - Gold Member
H-M Supporter Gold Member
Joined
Sep 7, 2019
Messages
498
Today I finally got everything out of the column! It'll take me a few days to post up all the pics though.

Next we'll tackle the feeding mechanism! In order to get the large crank gear out some of this stuff must be removed first.

Start by removing this connecting arm. It's a hex bolt on the forward side...

EM520043.JPG


EM520044.JPG



And a square head on the rearward side. Incidentally, this is where you change the feed from right to left, by loosening the square bolt and moving the T nut in the slot from "L" to "R" and retightening the bolt.

EM520045.JPG



Arm removed!

EM520046.JPG



Next up, the housings. They are just cast pot metal (zamak) so treat them gently.

Loosen and remove the large knurled lock nut. Hold the square nut simultaneously to keep the shaft from turning.

EM520049.JPG



Nut removed.

EM520050.JPG



There are two flat head screws holding the feed gear housing cover. Below is the rear screw...

EM520047.JPG



And the front screw.

EM520048.JPG



Please ignore the fact that the knurled nut is still installed in the previous two shots. Initially when taking the pictures I didn't realize that the nut must be removed BEFORE the two screws. I thought the cover might lift off vertically. It doesn't


Now the cover comes off. NOTE! there are alignment pins below each screw, watch out for them! They may stick in either side of the housing or fall out completely.

EM520051.JPG



The T nut now can be freed from its slot.

EM520052.JPG



Out it comes!

EM520053.JPG


More on the way!
 
Last edited:

Weldo

H-M Supporter - Gold Member
H-M Supporter Gold Member
Joined
Sep 7, 2019
Messages
498
To get the T nut gear off you must remove the nut on the back side of the housing. You can use a large flat screwdriver on the face to aid in removing the nut on the back side.

Here's a picture of the back side nut. Notice the T slot on the right side of the picture.

EM520054.JPG



If I recall this nut was 11/16"

EM520055.JPG



It's backed up by a lock washer and flat washer.

EM520056.JPG



Now the T nut gear slides right out.

EM520057.JPG


EM520058.JPG



Replace the hardware to keep track of it.

EM520059.JPG



Now for the other gear. It has a set screwed collar to hold it in place.

EM520060.JPG


This collar is actually threaded. The manual says there should be a piece of lead shot at the base of the set screw to protect the threads. I did not find such a thing but will keep that in mind for reassembly.

EM520061.JPG



Collar removed.

EM520062.JPG



Now the gear simply slides off.

EM520063.JPG


Presto!

EM520064.JPG



Almost done with this part!
 

Weldo

H-M Supporter - Gold Member
H-M Supporter Gold Member
Joined
Sep 7, 2019
Messages
498
Note the tiny woodruff key. Don't loose it! There's a few such keys in the shaper.

EM520065.JPG



Next I removed the bearing retainer ring. It's got six flat head screws.

EM520066.JPG



After the screws are gone it falls off.

EM520067.JPG



Next is a spacer ring that was behind the gear.

EM520068.JPG



It is also keyed.

EM520069.JPG


EM520070.JPG



Side cutters make for easy key removal!

EM520071.JPG



The rear part of the housing now slips off. Mine was quite tight and required lots of wiggling back and forth and some very light prying around the circumference.

EM520072.JPG



These housing castings are very thin and fragile. Be careful with them!

EM520073.JPG



That does it for the feeding mechanism. The large cylinder with the bolts around the flange is part of the bearing housing for the crank gear shaft. It will come off later during the crank gear removal. It's about the last piece to come off.
 

Weldo

H-M Supporter - Gold Member
H-M Supporter Gold Member
Joined
Sep 7, 2019
Messages
498
Now we can finally get to work on the crank gear.

First remove the six large flat head screws. On my machine it looked like they were heavily staked in place but I noticed that some of the stake marks were not lined up exactly like they should be. That tells me someone has disassembled these screws before. I had to use an impact screwdriver to remove them. Some took about a half dozen good whacks!

EM520117.JPG



The plates then come off.

EM520120.JPG



Both plates removed.

EM520121.JPG



Notice the socket head bolts. Four are visible here and one half hidden at six o'clock. There's another one behind the rectangular block.

They all get removed.

EM520122.JPG



These were not very tight on my shaper.

EM520123.JPG



To get the one behind the rectangular block, turn this square head shaft from the feed mechanism.

EM520124.JPG



That will move the rectangular block and reveal the socket head bolt.

EM520125.JPG


EM520126.JPG



Remove the other four bolts.

EM520127.JPG


EM520128.JPG
 

ErichKeane

Making scrap at ludicrous speed.
H-M Supporter Gold Member
Joined
Aug 3, 2017
Messages
783
Great progress!

I've had parts of that apart, but not that deep obviously. One thing I WAS amazed at is how (took it apart today!) Simple the ratchet mechanism is! They go for tons of money I'm told, and break often. They seem reasonably easy to make for something so simple!
 

Weldo

H-M Supporter - Gold Member
H-M Supporter Gold Member
Joined
Sep 7, 2019
Messages
498
At this point I thought the gear could be tapped out. The gear has a large shallow counter bore that fits snugly to a mating face very much like a lathe chuck fits on a face plate. There's also an alignment pin in the gear that indexes to that mating face plate.

I think it is possible to remove the gear at this point, but after I tapped on it a few times through the switch hole I decided to remove some more stuff just to see if there were any more hang ups.

I set to work to remove the rectangular block on the crank gear. You could do this step before you remove the six socket head bolts from the previous post. That would save you the trouble of repositioning the block to reveal the other bolt.

There is a set screw on the block holding a nut like on a lathe cross slide. The set screw is backed up with a jam nut/lock washer.

EM520131.JPG



Once loosened you can wiggle the block out. It took some light prying.

EM520132.JPG



Removed.

EM520133.JPG



The pinion on the center shaft is what I was worried about keeping the gear from tapping loose. I saw the assembly in the manual and didn't want to mess up the teeth on that pinion by forcing the gear off while the teeth were meshed.

EM520134.JPG



Loosen the nut on the end of the shaft, seen here caked in old grease.

EM520135.JPG



5/8" was a sloppy fit, but 9/16" was too small. The nut was not very tight so 5/8" did the trick. Hold the other end of the shaft with a wrench to keep it from turning while you loosen the nut.

EM520136.JPG



The nut was not very tight.

EM520137.JPG



Lock washer.

EM520138.JPG


EM520139.JPG



Almost there!
 

Weldo

H-M Supporter - Gold Member
H-M Supporter Gold Member
Joined
Sep 7, 2019
Messages
498
At this point I tried tapping the gear off again. I thought the lead screw and pinion would come off with the gear but it actually didn't.

I had to remove the switch plate cover first. Two flat head screws. These pics are from earlier in the process.

EM520041.JPG


EM520042.JPG



I then tried tapping the gear through the switch hole with a brass drift.

EM520129.JPG



Keep rotating the gear to tap evenly along the whole circumference.

EM520130.JPG



Eventually it comes free!

EM520140.JPG



Here can be seen the counter bore face plate interface.

EM520141.JPG



It's out!

EM520142.JPG



This is the backside, note the locating pin.

EM520143.JPG



Turns out the pinion and lead screw stay attached to the shaft part. So You can actually remove the gear BEFORE delving into the nut on the end of the shaft and the pinion gear. It probably doesn't really matter either way.

EM520144.JPG



I couldn't easily pull off the pinion gear so I tried tapping the shaft out from the inside.

EM520145.JPG


EM520146.JPG



It moved easily and allowed me to remove the pinion gear.

EM520147.JPG


EM520148.JPG



Another tiny woodruff key.

EM520149.JPG



And a spacer.

EM520150.JPG



There was on the back side of the spacer a tiny ring of brass. This is not shown on the manual.

EM520151.JPG



All parts removed form the shaft.

EM520152.JPG
 

Weldo

H-M Supporter - Gold Member
H-M Supporter Gold Member
Joined
Sep 7, 2019
Messages
498
The shaft now easily pulls out.

EM520153.JPG


EM520154.JPG


EM520155.JPG



Now to tap the outer shaft from the outside towards the inside of the column. This was a little bit tight but the soft faced dead blow moved it no problem.

EM520156.JPG



The shaft popped out with its bearing.

EM520157.JPG



Loads of grease! I intend to restore this machine to the proper recommended lube, which is light oil. If I hadn't taken this apart to clean out the grease the oil might have never found its way to the bearings.

EM520158.JPG


EM520159.JPG



Here's a view of the screw mechanism.

EM520160.JPG



The bearing on the outside popped out when the shaft was released.

EM520161.JPG



Now the bearing housing can be removed. It was lightly tapped around the circumference after the bolts were taken out.

EM520171.JPG



It comes out of a shallow bore.

EM520172.JPG



More grease.

EM520173.JPG



Looks fresh at least!

EM520174.JPG



And that's the crank gear removed! The last piece is the pinion shaft. It's the smaller gear that turns the crank gear. I actually tried to remove it BEFORE the crank gear but I found some interference that indicated it would be much easier to remove the pinion shaft if the crank gear was out of the way.
 

BGHansen

H-M Supporter - Gold Member
H-M Supporter Gold Member
Joined
Nov 23, 2014
Messages
1,544
The shaft now easily pulls out.

View attachment 327074

View attachment 327075

View attachment 327076


Now to tap the outer shaft from the outside towards the inside of the column. This was a little bit tight but the soft faced dead blow moved it no problem.

View attachment 327077


The shaft popped out with its bearing.

View attachment 327078


Loads of grease! I intend to restore this machine to the proper recommended lube, which is light oil. If I hadn't taken this apart to clean out the grease the oil might have never found its way to the bearings.

View attachment 327079

View attachment 327080


Here's a view of the screw mechanism.

View attachment 327081


The bearing on the outside popped out when the shaft was released.

View attachment 327082


Now the bearing housing can be removed. It was lightly tapped around the circumference after the bolts were taken out.

View attachment 327083


It comes out of a shallow bore.

View attachment 327084


More grease.

View attachment 327085


Looks fresh at least!

View attachment 327086


And that's the crank gear removed! The last piece is the pinion shaft. It's the smaller gear that turns the crank gear. I actually tried to remove it BEFORE the crank gear but I found some interference that indicated it would be much easier to remove the pinion shaft if the crank gear was out of the way.
Great job documenting the process! We all love seeing how these machines actually work. Another plus side to many photos is when you put it back together you can review them in case the Atlas manual and the actual shaper differ some.

Bruce
 

Weldo

H-M Supporter - Gold Member
H-M Supporter Gold Member
Joined
Sep 7, 2019
Messages
498
Yea, I’ll probably take a few days to clean everything up so referring back to the pictures will be a great help.
 

Weldo

H-M Supporter - Gold Member
H-M Supporter Gold Member
Joined
Sep 7, 2019
Messages
498
The last part to come out is the pinion shaft.

Here it can be seen with its 4 step pulley. Remove the single set screw in the pulley groove.

EM520081.JPG



The pulley comes off fairly easily.

EM520082.JPG



Pinion shaft. Another tiny woodruff key. The threads on the end are for the grease cup.

EM520083.JPG



There's a threaded nut to remove on both ends of the shaft. It's tough to see through the years of dried grease.

EM520084.JPG



But there's two holes like the nut on an electric angle grinder.

EM520102.JPG



There's also a set screw on each of the threaded nuts. That is one on each end of the shaft. Below is the pulley end.

EM520103.JPG



And the other end.

EM520104.JPG
 

Weldo

H-M Supporter - Gold Member
H-M Supporter Gold Member
Joined
Sep 7, 2019
Messages
498
Here you can see the two holes for a spanner wrench.

EM520105.JPG



And the same two holes on the pulley side of the shaft.

EM520107.JPG



I modified an angle grinder wrench to fit. The center to center was just slightly too large on the wrench so I just ground the pins a little to fit.

EM520108.JPG



It was not super tight.

EM520109.JPG



The other one came off in similar fashion.

EM520110.JPG
 

Weldo

H-M Supporter - Gold Member
H-M Supporter Gold Member
Joined
Sep 7, 2019
Messages
498
Now we turn our attention to the inside parts of the shaft. You'll notice that the crank gear is still installed in the following pictures. That is because the pictures were taken before I realized that the crank gear must be removed BEFORE the pinion shaft. If you attempt to tap the pinion shaft out with the crank gear still installed, the collars on the pinion shaft will hit the crank gear preventing removal of the shaft.

On the pinion shaft are a couple of collars and a gear. There is a collar on the left but it's kind of buried. Solid pins hold the right collar and gear onto the shaft. Below, the punch is pointing to the pin in the collar.

EM520111.JPG



And the pin in the gear. It's hard to see.

EM520112.JPG



They punch out with little effort.

EM520114.JPG



The gear can be slid on the shaft to reveal a woodruff key. It's not visible in the picture but there is a tiny solid pin that is drilled axially in the gear that mates with a hole in the buried collar on the left side of the picture. That pin is around 1/8" diameter and 1/2" long.

EM520115.JPG



From here I had removed the crank gear and the shaft can be tapped out from either side. The bearing will push out the race since the bearings are pressed to the shaft more tightly than the races are pressed. Below is the race from the pulley side nearly removed. I tapped the opposite side with a brass drift.

EM520119.JPG



A little more tapping frees it up.

EM520162.JPG



Now since the crank gear is gone, the whole shaft can be removed through the race bore. First we see the pulley side bearing.

EM520163.JPG



Next is the collar that was buried in the previous shots.

EM520164.JPG



Followed by the gear.

EM520165.JPG



And finally the other collar and bearing.

EM520166.JPG



The astute among us may realize that there really is no need to remove the pins from the collar and gear in a earlier steps since the whole shaft comes out through the bore anyway. You would be correct. However at the time I was trying to figure out how to get the shaft out with the interference of the crank gear. I thought that if I freed up all the collars/gears/bearings on the shaft that I could slide the shaft out from inside those parts. Turns out the bearings are pretty tightly pressed on though so this idea didn't work.

Once I removed the crank gear, the pinion shaft becomes much easier and the collars/gear could have been left in place. You would simply tap on the shaft to press out the opposite race, then the shaft could be passed through with all its collars and gears in place.

The last part is the opposite side race. I tapped it out with a brass drift.

EM520167.JPG




EM520168.JPG


EM520169.JPG



Nice!

EM520170.JPG



That's it! We've removed all the internal parts to an Atlas 7B shaper! Now for lots of cleaning...
 
It can take up to an hour for ads to appear on the page. See our code implementation guide for more details. If you already have Auto ad code on your pages there's no need to replace it with this code
Top
AdBlock Detected

We get it, advertisements are annoying!

Sure, ad-blocking software does a great job at blocking ads, but it also blocks useful features of our website. For the best site experience please disable your AdBlocker.

I've Disabled AdBlock