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[4]

Goofs & Blunders You Should Avoid.

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bobl

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First time ever for this hobbyist. I was side milling a fairly small part held in the vice on two parallels. I taped the part down onto the parallels while tightening the vise. The part being milled was outside the vise jaws. Long story short one parallel managed to slip forward and crash the end mill. Parallel survived, milling cutter not so much.

I took a piece of shipping steel banding and bent it into a U to hold the parallels tight against the jaws and also made sure the part was seated firmly on both parallels.

David
Springs are also good


Sent from my iPod touch using Tapatalk
 

Wreck™Wreck

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Always ensure the chuck jaws are engaged in the spiral.
Very quickly I set up a half inch wide cut off of a large plastic pipe and used the three jaw to expand outwards on the inside of the pipe so I could true the face.
OK, nice and tight, start to cut and zoom, bang!
two of the jaws flew across the room, they had expanded enough to pop out the spiral but the plastic ring kept them in place so I hadnt noticed.
Luckily I was not in the line of flight.
I always spin the chuck by hand in a small lathe before running the spindle. unusual run out will tell you immediatley that something is wrong, keep this in mind.
 

Downunder Bob

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I always spin the chuck by hand in a small lathe before running the spindle. unusual run out will tell you immediatley that something is wrong, keep this in mind.
Iguess that's one advantage of having done an apprenticeship. I was taught to always check that thejaws are well engaged. If my set up looks like being anywhere neer the limit of engagement I check where that limit is and see how much margin I have. If it looks a bit risky then I can reset the jaws on the next step, or use another set up plan.
 

mcostello

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Another tip is, If using a magnetic chuck, turn it on, then try to move the piece, a quick shake can save the day. The first grind job when I got My surface grinder was to sharpen a lathe groove tool. It was Stellite and found out it was non-magnetic. Glad I checked. Saved a pair of undies that day. :)
 

richl

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How about this one....
I really enjoy welding, I don't get to do it too much. Mig And stick machines in the shop, so there really is no reason not to. Getting up in age almost 60, eyes aren't so good anymore. The last year I've really had trouble welding, I could not see the puddle, and my welds were wandering anywhere but where I wanted them.

Well jump forward to monday, eclipse, welding helmets make decent glasses for them. I broke out a couple helmets... I noticed that there was protective film paper on the glass of one of the helmets... crap!!! Peaked off all film from all lens I replaced over a year ago!!! My welds just have substantially improved lol

Won't forget that one anytime soon

Rich
 

hman

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Yes, what could go wrong, please don't tell me this happened in a civilised country.
I did notice some kind of Chinese ideographs on the lower forklift near the end of the video.
 

4gsr

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If only they had a third, bigger fork-lift to lift the one on the ground........;)
-brino
Brino,

Somewhere on the internet is a picture of three fork lifts, one on top of each other, reaching about 30 feet in the air. With a man cage on the upper forklift extended up. The guy is in the cage using a cutting torch to cut a beam or angle, not really specific.
 

Wreck™Wreck

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Lathe crash.
Set up a 2 axis lathe this past Thursday for someone to run 2000 parts in 1" OD X 1/16" wall aluminum tubes, the lengths are centerless ground then saw cut to 8.100". The lathe work is face to 8" +- .020" in length an put a small deburr chamfer on each end and they are done.

Simple work, chuck part against stop, push start button and let run. When it stops unchuck and flip 180 Degrees and repeat, this all takes about 45 seconds of spindle time, he ran 300 or so on Thursday. and turns the machine off for the night. Friday morning he turns it on and runs the first part before I get there and check it, to no ones surprise but his it lost position whilst powered down and crashed right into the first part with the tool body.

Like so. It formed the end into a flange, it did not stop until the part spun in the chuck and overloaded the Z axis servo drive, the chuck jaw marks are clearly seen, these are mild steel soft jaws. Had about 1" to go before the tool ran into the 8" 3-Jaw chuck which would have been very ugly indeed.

It scared the pants off of him, he won't do it again.
i-BFH98Gq.jpg
 

middle.road

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Note to self, check lathe carriage for 'stink bugs', the brown variety that we have here in East TN in abundance.
Was turning and threading some 1" aluminum tube to 7/8-32. (No relation to Wreck™Wreck's post above :) )
On the second skim pass on the threading operation to verify it, the half-nut did not disengage and my reflexes
were not quick enough to hit the BIG RED stop button.
There was a large nest of the bugs up in the carriage. So bad that their carcasses in the upper portion of the half-nut
assembly had prevented the slide from retracting and disengaging.
At the end of the crash the face of the 3-jaws were jammed nice and tight against the AXA holder, the piece was
mangled and the bit was buried deep into the 1" portion of stock.
Thankfully, due to dumb luck or maybe an over worked guardian angel, the chuck didn't collide hard with the compound.
It did mess up the shaft on the quick-change gears, had to dis-assemble and de-burr.
The half-nut assembly still isn't right, so I guess I'll be doing a carriage tear down.
Also I'm now threading using the inverted bit, threading away from the chuck, method.
 

middle.road

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Did they stink when they crashed your lathe
Most definitely. But I ignored it. They are such a nuisance and camp out everywhere that one ceases to be amazed.
I fired up my bandsaw for the first time in over a year and they were falling out of the motor housing. *stench*
And those tarps you have stashed up on a shelf? They had better be double bagged in plastic bags else you have a boat load.
I've had my fill of them that is for sure.
 

Scruffy

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I was splitting some kindling for my shop wood stove yesterday morning. Yep the old hatchet was very sharp, and no I didn’nt know the dog had followed me on to the shop.
Results. One cold nose to my butt and one nasty cut to my left thumb. Then the day just got worse.
Thanks ron
 

hman

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Guess ya shouldn'ta been out chopping wood with your nether regions exposed :) Safety equipment should include pants.

Then again, there was the country granny who usedta chop wood by propping it up with her slippered feet. Some busybody told her she oughta be using safety shoes. She replied that she'd tried them once, but they dulled her axe.

OK, sorry to be off topic ... but I just couldn't resist.
 

Wreck™Wreck

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This past Thursday a guy was drilling holes in 4" wide 1/4" thick stainless channels, the last op was drilling the holes in the leg sides. Holding them in 3 Kurt vices. They are nearly 100" long so he had the side door panels off so they would fit.

Long story short the first part made a 200 IPM rapid to the first position and hit the yellow roof post in the background and bent the part.
Do not try this at home. This Fadal is a stout machine.
i-9H9RhPG.jpg
 
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