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Goofs & Blunders You Should Avoid.

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MrWhoopee

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While working for Fred, he bought a large horizontal/vertical mill. The mill (weighing 13k lbs) arrived on a flatbed semi trailer. The only forklift he could borrow was 10k capacity. As usual, I was the designated lift operator. With the addition of 3 or 4 human counterweights on the back and full back tilt, I was able to get the mill about 3 inches above the trailer and the truck driver pulled forward. I began to gently lower the mill to the ground. Mind you, the mast was tilted all the way back, so as I was lowering, the load was also moving forward. Fred then told one of the counterweights to jump off and get some timbers to put under the mill. Instantly the lift began to tip forward. I hit full down as fast as I could, to no avail. The mill slid off the forks, hitting the concrete with a thunderous crash. When the forklift rebounded, the forks flipped back over top, ending up vibrating on either side of me. No one was injured, but my knees would not support me for over half an hour.

Physics, it's not just a good idea, it's the LAW!
 

hman

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Durn! You were very lucky that day.
 

JimDawson

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So today I scrapped a crankshaft for a little punch press I'm building for a customer :rolleyes:

The crank started out life as a chunk of 3 inch (another screw up, I intended to order 2 inch) 4340 pre-hard round bar (machines about like a grade 8 bolt) A lot of chips before I got it turned down to size. Quite a nice job also, the bearing journals finished to +/- 0.00005 (at least at the temperature in the shop :) )

Only one small problem...... The throw on the crank is supposed to be 0.375, so offset in the 4 jaw 1/2 the throw or 0.1875 right? .....WRONG. :mad: I don't know what I was thinking. :faint: But the throw did come out at exactly 0.1875.

So about 6 hours and $75 in material into the scrap pile. I have the new crank just about built, this time I'll make sure the offset is 0.375. I have to get it right this time, it's the last of the material. :cautious:

Here is a rather expensive piece of scrap. Ignore the numbers on the notepad, nothing to do with the crank.
1535947796591.png

Here's the press frame. I'll post a build thread on this later.
1535948045632.png
 

Downunder Bob

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Nice looking project, reminds me of my toolmaking days, in the far distant past. I guess we all make mistakes like that from time to time, That part will find a use somewhere, you just have to remember where you put it when you want it.
 

Janderso

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Never stuff match heads into an empty CO2 cartridge.
I tried it 49 years ago.
Lost some fingers and The use of my sewn on pinky.
I still do love fireworks

6AD01748-AB53-4D43-AE83-509182A1ED04.jpeg
 

RJSakowski

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12 years old I built a man trap in the back yard.
A trip wire that sent a concrete block onto your head.
I walked through it to see if it would work.
It did.
Fortunately,you survived the experience. I think most of us could admit to similar goofs when we were that age.. Myself, I've got the scars to prove it.
 
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MikeWi

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Ok, I've got one about as bad as Savarin (don't think I told this yet, but I'm old). I was in elementary school, I think about 6th grade, so what, about 11 years old? A friend of mine had an older brother that reloaded cartridges, and he knew where there was a coffee can full of "gunpowder".

Now, I have no idea what it was of course, it may have been nothing, smokeless powder, or black powder. The thing is that he snuck it out of the house, and four of us took it out into a big farm field and stood around it trying to light it with matches.

Read that again for effect. It was a windy day, and we eventually gave up. Granted it wasn't exactly a bomb in that form, but we still could have been seriously hurt. I cringe when ever I think about it.
 

Downunder Bob

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I could list at least a dozen poorly conceived ideas that us lads thought were ok at the time. For some inexplicable reason we all still have all our fingers and toes and no one lost their sight or any other serious injury.

One good idea at about age 12 or so was to get a supply of penny bangers or bungers (fire crackers ) The plan was to stand with a bucket of water at our feet and holding said penny bunger in outstretched naked hand light the fuse and hold it long enough, so that when dropped it would fall into water and explode showering us with water. The trick was to hold it long enough so that when dropped the burning fuse was far enough inside the banger that it was not extinguished by the water before it exploded, but not too long so that it exploded in your hand, we got pretty good at it without serious injury.
 

uncle harry

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good parenting in those days, dad just said "That was bloody stupid wasnt it, bet you wont do that again"

That reminds me of my Dad's commentary when I made an oxyacetylene bomb (inadvertently). he said "I'd rather tackle a wildcat then mess with that stuff!" I was age 12 and burning steel wool in oxygen repeating an experiment by Mr Wizard as seen on live TV. Of course I wondered what adding a pinch of acetylene would look like.
 

macardoso

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Pressed an AC bearing into a bore deep down in a part, realized I was premature in pressing it in (still have to sand and paint), tried to tap it out from the back and separated the races (balls went flying everywhere). Now I have and AC bearing race stuck in my bore:rolleyes:
 

Nogoingback

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Ok, I've got one about as bad as Savarin (don't think I told this yet, but I'm old). I was in elementary school, I think about 6th grade, so what, about 11 years old? A friend of mine had an older brother that reloaded cartridges, and he knew where there was a coffee can full of "gunpowder".

Now, I have no idea what it was of course, it may have been nothing, smokeless powder, or black powder. The thing is that he snuck it out of the house, and four of us took it out into a big farm field and stood around it trying to light it with matches.

Read that again for effect. It was a windy day, and we eventually gave up. Granted it wasn't exactly a bomb in that form, but we still could have been seriously hurt. I cringe when ever I think about it.

When I was a kid, my best friend and I used to "liberate" smokeless powder from his Dad's supplies and make bombs by making
paper mache casings and fuse material. They worked great! I wonder what the art teacher would have thought if she knew
what use we had for the paper mache making skills she taught us. :)

At least we had the sense to use long fuses.
 

mcostello

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Filled a baggie with gasoline and gave it an underhand toss into a lit coal furnace. Did not have to trim My eyebrows for a while, while parents wondered what filled the basement with smoke. Another friend took a pot shot at a plane with a hand gun and got found out and permantly lost His hunting license. He also tossed an unknown amount of smokeless gun powder into the house furnace and blew the door off. The stories could go on...........
 

savarin

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collected 500 penny bangers one guy faulkes night to liberate for the powder.
It was used in cannons and sort of guns.
My one was 6ft steel conduit, flattened at one end with a small hole to take the banger fuse, clamped to a large piece of wood and wrapped with as much duckt tape as we could.
Loaded with a large amount of powder, a box of cat slugs, about a dozen chunks of lead from piano keys and wadding.
I held it against my side aimed at some ducks out on the pit (lake) whilst my mate lit the fuse.
as I picked myself up of the ground from the recoil I just saw the water all around the ducks erupt into a huge mass of foam. No sign of the ducks afterwards.
Never had to guts to try another shot.
 

Vandal Machining

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Don't believe the wiring diagram on Chinese equipment outright. Thought the motor was dead on my RF-30, turns out the diagram showed wiring as it should be if a temperature breaker was installed (the temperature breaker was not shown in the diagram). Reviewed about 4 different RF based wiring diagrams and to find the problem.
 

kdupuis

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8 years old and my dad was working on an 8 foot ladder. I commenced to walk under said ladder to go outside. Just when I thought I was clear a 4 pound sledge hammer hit the top of my head. I remember waking in the hospital with a headache, 13 stitches and a bald spot on top of my head. Looked pretty bad at school two days later.
 

benmychree

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8 years old and my dad was working on an 8 foot ladder. I commenced to walk under said ladder to go outside. Just when I thought I was clear a 4 pound sledge hammer hit the top of my head. I remember waking in the hospital with a headache, 13 stitches and a bald spot on top of my head. Looked pretty bad at school two days later.
Always heard it was unlucky to do that, you proved it! I heard it was good luck to toss a horseshoe over your shoulder, tried same, bad toss, came down on the top of my head; stiches, bald spot ----
 

MrWhoopee

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8 years old and my dad was working on an 8 foot ladder. I commenced to walk under said ladder to go outside. Just when I thought I was clear a 4 pound sledge hammer hit the top of my head. I remember waking in the hospital with a headache, 13 stitches and a bald spot on top of my head. Looked pretty bad at school two days later.
And we all thought that was just a superstition.
 

amsoilman

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Put a spool on my recurve bow to try shooting carp in the creek. First shot the arrow went out about 15’, line hung up and the arrow came back just as fast. Luckily it missed me. My DW saw that and said I was an idiot.
 

eugene13

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Yesterday I was wondering what was wrong with my drill operation, it just wasn't working right.......and then realized the bit was spinning backward!
Some years ago I had installed a reverse switch on my drill press.....don't exactly remember why I needed it.
Apparently I had managed to toggle the rocker switch when I moved the drill press around the shop last week.

-brino
I had a similar problem, with a left hand drill bit.
 

hman

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Yesterday I was wondering what was wrong with my drill operation, it just wasn't working right.......and then realized the bit was spinning backward!
Some years ago I had installed a reverse switch on my drill press.....don't exactly remember why I needed it.
Apparently I had managed to toggle the rocker switch when I moved the drill press around the shop last week.

-brino
I've installed reverse switches on both my mills, for use during threading. But just to prevent embarrassment, I've added safety covers (ex Radio Shack.) Here's the one on my mini-mill:
kkHPIM4845 reverse switch.jpg
 

Dabbler

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It all started when I was 15. I did stage magic, both for big events and for birthday parties (to pay for my hobby) Now for years I had dabbled in chemistry, and I had quite the lab.

(cue the ominous music) I decided to make some very special flash powder. I wanted it to make a noise as well as a bright light, but without containment, After a few trials I *almost * had it perfect: It ignited so swiftly that it made a 'whoosh' rather than the moderate burn that even uncontained pistol powder makes.

My huge error was trying to make it bright. Now I knew a lot about chemistry but not enough. so I mixed some red phosphorus into the mix to give it better light output - well that part was right - and began mixing a 30 gram batch (about 2 ounces dry measure). Little known fact: when you dry out red phosphorus after it self hydrates (it takes moisture from the air to do that) it can, and usually does, self-ignite.

The result was a flame that reached the ceiling of our basement past my hand and face. It was, essentially a strong propellant. The heat was so intense it cracked the pyrex mortar that it was contained in. I got 3rd degree burns on my hand, first degree burns and unburnt phosphorus in one eye and the rest of my face, leaving me without eyebrows and temporarily blind. I needed burn care for more than a week in hospital.

I gave up chemistry after that...
 

Suzuki4evr

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I am game, made a few errors over the years.
Do not leave the drawbar wrench on the drawbar and then turn the spindle on with a Bridgeport type mill. This I have done in the past, I am short in stature however and no harm was done.

Turning the spindle on when it is holding an indicator is not recommended.
The last few years I have been programming CNC lathes, rapid moves go from the current position to the start position in a hurry, I have managed to break 2 parting tools so far, I have no problem with parting operations I do seem to bugger the rapid moves however.
Wrench on the drawbar thing.........did that a few times. I am lucky so far the spanner always flew in another direction than my head and I am tall,my head is at the same hight as the spanner.
 

Nogoingback

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It all started when I was 15. I did stage magic, both for big events and for birthday parties (to pay for my hobby) Now for years I had dabbled in chemistry, and I had quite the lab.

(cue the ominous music) I decided to make some very special flash powder. I wanted it to make a noise as well as a bright light, but without containment, After a few trials I *almost * had it perfect: It ignited so swiftly that it made a 'whoosh' rather than the moderate burn that even uncontained pistol powder makes.

My huge error was trying to make it bright. Now I knew a lot about chemistry but not enough. so I mixed some red phosphorus into the mix to give it better light output - well that part was right - and began mixing a 30 gram batch (about 2 ounces dry measure). Little known fact: when you dry out red phosphorus after it self hydrates (it takes moisture from the air to do that) it can, and usually does, self-ignite.

The result was a flame that reached the ceiling of our basement past my hand and face. It was, essentially a strong propellant. The heat was so intense it cracked the pyrex mortar that it was contained in. I got 3rd degree burns on my hand, first degree burns and unburnt phosphorus in one eye and the rest of my face, leaving me without eyebrows and temporarily blind. I needed burn care for more than a week in hospital.

I gave up chemistry after that...

Kind of reminds me of the kid that brought a small vial of nitroglycerin to chemistry class one day. His dad owned a demolition company
that used explosives to bring down buildings. No harm done on that particular occasion, and best of all, the teacher never caught on.
He was a very smart guy, in a 15 year old sort of way, so I figured it was 50/50 on whether he would survive to adulthood.
 

mmcmdl

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A New York co-worker lost 2 fingers in a BP this past week . Wearing gloves , he was loading a part onto a rotary table with the spindle running which caught hold of the glove . He has been a master machinist for 28 years I was told . Corporate safety was here reviewing the accident with all mechanics and machinists this morning . Pics were provided too .

Be careful out there . :)
 

astjp2

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A New York co-worker lost 2 fingers in a BP this past week . Wearing gloves , he was loading a part onto a rotary table with the spindle running which caught hold of the glove . He has been a master machinist for 28 years I was told . Corporate safety was here reviewing the accident with all mechanics and machinists this morning . Pics were provided too .

Be careful out there . :)
The pics must not have been pleasant. I had to watch videos of arc flash injuries, not a pleasant thing to see. Arc Flash is a horrible way to die. The fat from your body will burn like oil on fire...
 

benmychree

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The only machine that I can think of where one SHOULD wear gloves is a welding machine! All others, at your peril. Also loading a part with the spindle running? Another NO, NO!
 

astjp2

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My last job had you wear cut proof gloves when loading aluminum block, that **** is razor sharp and we had pallets and tombstones to load so no moving parts to get hung up on.
 
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