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Goofs & Blunders You Should Avoid.

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HarryJM

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While working as a mechanic at Hawkeye Honda in Davenport Iowa (sometime around 1977) one of the other motorcycle mechanics was grinding some metal off his magnesium chain sprocket cover and left a little pile of ground up magnesium behind at the grinder. So at little while letter another mechanic starts to grind a piece of steel and created a little explosion. Lucky no one was hurt.
 

Firstram

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A New York co-worker lost 2 fingers in a BP this past week . Wearing gloves , he was loading a part onto a rotary table with the spindle running which caught hold of the glove . He has been a master machinist for 28 years I was told . Corporate safety was here reviewing the accident with all mechanics and machinists this morning . Pics were provided too .

Be careful out there . :)

I have a co-worker that tried to brush the swarf off an annular cutter while it was running, he was wearing leather gloves. It ripped the 2 smallest fingers off his right hand along with the tendons that were attached to them. I've worked with him for over 30 years, unfortunately he's the kind of guy who won't listen us younger kids.
 

macardoso

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The pics must not have been pleasant. I had to watch videos of arc flash injuries, not a pleasant thing to see. Arc Flash is a horrible way to die. The fat from your body will burn like oil on fire...
100% agree. That's some scary stuff. I hate wearing FR stuff in a hot building but it beats getting your face melted off.
 

bfd

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glovrs are not to be worn around rotating equipment bill
 

jbltwin1

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I was just funning with you! I actually remember looking at the one of the old "how to run a lathe" type documents from the 30's or so and the guy WAS wearing a tie while running a lathe. Different world back then! Mike.
 

Suzuki4evr

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Veeeeeeery different. But I am sure there was common sense back then...............or maybe not.;) I am sure I am going to get some flack from that generation in a about a minute.
 

NortonDommi

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I was just funning with you! I actually remember looking at the one of the old "how to run a lathe" type documents from the 30's or so and the guy WAS wearing a tie while running a lathe. Different world back then! Mike.
I think that is why tie-clips were invented.
 

jbltwin1

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They showed one guy with his tie tucked into his button up shirt between the buttons!
 

Flyinfool

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The place I work at now, when I started it was required that the engineers wear a tie. It only took me a couple of days to figure out that the engineers were also required to go out on the shop floor to assist and/or answer questions as well as work on prototype machine builds and testing. Of course I immediately lost the tie, when called out on it, I explained the perils of a tie in a shop as well as the history of a tie. Now there is no one in the company that wears a tie.
What is really scary is that the engineering manager then mentioned that he once got his tie caught by the lead screw on a lathe, lucky for him he was a very big strong guy and the machine was running at a slow enough speed for him to react, he was able to plant both hands on the machine and was strong enough to hold back till the tie broke and did not have his face pulled into the machine.
 

ErichKeane

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I had three blunders last night...

First, I went try to fix up a lathe backing plate (the threads on the L1 chuck weren't cut deep enough I think), got everything lined up and did a few cuts. I must have cut too deep on one of my runs, because the cast iron of the backing plate just started flaking off. Part ruined.

Second, I started trying to test out my ability to cut threads. I thought the above happened because my gearbox was wrong or something, so I configured my lathe to cut what I thought was 8 TPI this time (instead of 6). I cut about a half dozen test cuts, all ended up being about 6 TPI! I pulled a bunch of covers off of gearboxes, and couldn't figure out what the heck had happened! Only then did I look to the RIGHT of the '8' on the chart, and saw a '6 1/2'. Turns out my lathe has TWO '6' TPI locations (see 'C' with end lever 2, left position, B with end lever 2, right position) and the one on 'C' looks a heck of a lot like an 8 :)

THEN, when testing out 12 TPI (minor screw up, I put the lever in 'A' instead of 'C', so was shocked to see 12 TPI result in 3 TPI), I forgot to take my chuck key out. I was in back gears so it happened slowly, but the key hit the carriage apron and sheared the 9/16" key right across. It was the least violent way I've seen something like this happen, but the 15HP lathe in backgears didn't even make a noise when tearing that key in half. If it wasn't for the end of the key falling out of the chuck and hitting the chip pan, it likely wouldn't have made a noise.

I then opted to just call it a night :)
 

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hman

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What is really scary is that the engineering manager then mentioned that he once got his tie caught by the lead screw on a lathe, lucky for him he was a very big strong guy and the machine was running at a slow enough speed for him to react, he was able to plant both hands on the machine and was strong enough to hold back till the tie broke and did not have his face pulled into the machine.
Scary indeed that he didn't learn anything from the experience!
 

savarin

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I like those old photos in popular mechanics where they are wearing long sleeved white coats, shirts and ties and smoking a pipe whilst doing something.
 

Nogoingback

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Well, today I did something for the first time. I started the lathe with a key in the Jacobs spindle chuck. Naturally, I was in hurry and therefore Not Thinking. I lucked out: my VFD ramps up speed slowly, so the key just fell out into the chip pan
as it rotated around. No harm, no foul.
 

Downunder Bob

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Way back when I was an apprentice, most of the older tradesmen wore a tie, some wore a waistcoat and even a jacket in colder weather. For the first two years we had to wear navy blue boiler maker overalls.

When we started 3rd year we were allowed to wear grey dust coats. same as some of the tradesman wore. Like a white lab coat but grey. They came in short sleeve for summer and long sleeve for winter but the sleeves had a button closure so they could be done up tight around the wrist for safety. These were normally worn over street clothes.
 

uncle harry

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I like those old photos in popular mechanics where they are wearing long sleeved white coats, shirts and ties and smoking a pipe whilst doing something.
My Harrison M300 lathe operation manual has a picture of a machinist with a full length coat & a tie. My 300 is early green so I assume that it's a late '70 model Brit made.
 

savarin

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Went to part of some stainless today.
WOW! the noise and screeching chatter, what the hell???
Checked the QCTP, no, thats all tight, all the gibbs are tight, saddle locked etc etc.
OK, just a quick look at the tool height but that should fine, I mean, I havnt changed the blade or anything.
WRONG, I replaced the plinth with the top slide to cut some tapers and the blade is now sitting 4mm lower.
Re set the height and it was back to nice long ribbons peeling off.
Phew! Glad I got that sorted.
 

westerner

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I love it when the basic, fundamental premises are revealed as "crucial".
It helps me to remember that just because I have been doing "fill in the blank" all my life, I still may not have covered ALL the basics THIS time.
Good stuff, and thanks! Kids, take note.....
 

grotto

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I was changing the bit in my mill and got called away. Came back and started the mill. Heard a clunk then a loud clicking. Realised I'd left the wrench on the draw bar after tightening it.
Luckily I switched from using a ring spanned to tighten the drawbar awhile ago, and have been using a ratchet & socket. The force swung the ratchet until it hit the motor, but then just “ratcheted”. I'm not sure what would have happened if it had been a spanned, but reckon it wouldn't have been good.
 

markba633csi

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I did that once on a Bridgeport, and only once. The wrench was REALLY hard to undo, and it leaves a mark on the motor. Boss never saw it.
 

Silverbullet

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I watch a ton of YouTube videos, some of these so called machinist scare the crap out of me. Ragged long sleeves shirts , gloves work type not the rippable latex , beards and chinny braided up in rubber bands. Rings watches . Things my old shop teacher in vokie would have drug us around the shop by to prove how dangerous it is. I've tried politely to ask them to be more SAFTEY conscious. Then I see ones where a shirt got caught and ripped a guy up , another who died . Really If your showing how to do something for others to do , it's your responsibility to be safe and tell them how powerfully machines are made. Just a peeve of mine ,, please be safe it sucks to be hurt .
 

RJSakowski

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I don't believe that choosing to ignore safety precautions makes you a bad machinist.
 

RJSakowski

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Elaborate, please, RJ...
Case in point, Keith Fenner has (had) a "chinny braided up in rubber bands" but clearly is an experienced and qualified machinist. Tom Lipton has a beard and I regard him as an experienced machinist.
If a machinist chooses to ignore recognized safety practices, that is their prerogative. It may make them irresponsible but I wouldn't go so far as to call them "so called machinists".
 

Dabbler

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Risk management is something that is ill understood in both industrial and academic settings. Formal risk management is not what most think it is. (yes I am trained in Risk Management and have been paid to conduct many assessments in my career).

Of the very best machinists I've known, some wore rings and some didn't. Some wore short sleeves like Pieczynski does, Some wear long sleeves, like Lipton. Fact is, some of the old school taboos just aren't relevant. I truly believe that I will never attain the level of skill of a Pieczynski or a Lipton. What I do or wear in my shop is MY business, as is yours. Learn their techniques, but learn to operate your machines safely, according to your own lights.
 

Bob Korves

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Case in point, Keith Fenner has (had) a "chinny braided up in rubber bands" but clearly is an experienced and qualified machinist. Tom Lipton has a beard and I regard him as an experienced machinist.
If a machinist chooses to ignore recognized safety practices, that is their prerogative. It may make them irresponsible but I wouldn't go so far as to call them "so called machinists".
Thanks for making it clear, RJ. I agree with that outlook. I also do understand employers demanding certain behaviors in the cause of liability as well as for caring enough for their employees to not want them to get hurt.
 

RJSakowski

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Thanks for making it clear, RJ. I agree with that outlook. I also do understand employers demanding certain behaviors in the cause of liability as well as for caring enough for their employees to not want them to get hurt.
Bob, I agree with that. I totally understand employers required to provide safe work practices. The last company that I worked for had required training in both shop and office environments. As a manager, I had to have additional training
Edit: this was posted before completed. Here is the completed post.
As a manager, I had to have additional training in manufacturing, laboratory, and shop safety, including the responsibility for all my reports.
 
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