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Keep Your Fingers Clear of the Angle Grinder (Warning - Pic Included)

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HBilly1022

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#1
This happened a few months ago while I was doing some precision grinding with my angle grinder. When it happened I felt it right away but still had the grinder running and couldn't drop it. I had to shut it off and put it down safely, instead of throwing it aside. Then quickly go and clean all the crap out before the pain started. I contemplated going to see the doc but opted not to. I was concerned that it might not heal well since there was a bit of flesh missing and the white thing in the cut looked like it might be a nerve that could end up healing itself to the skin and that might be a long term issue with sensitivity. In the end it turned out fine although there is some sensitivity when it gets cold.

1510533958153.png
 

papa-roe

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#2
Woooo doggies! That is an impressive wound. My luck, I would have grabbed a rag to wrap it just as I realize that it is soaked with paint thinner. I can't like the picture but I thank you for the warning.
 

markba633csi

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#4
Welcome to the club :cupcake: ouch ouch ouch
ps I had my angle grinder lose the wheel which then ran across the yard- away from me fortunately
Mark
 
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Suzuki4evr

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#7
Lost one finger allready in motorcycle accident (caused by car driver), don't want to lose another, but happens to all of us.Welcome to the club.I think the white part is the tip of the bone. Good luck. Just watch out for infection.
 

NortonDommi

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#8
Occupational hazzard for some, personally I never use an angle grinder without leather gloves on, my preference is good quality Riggers gloves and I buy on the small side then break in the same way the Army taught with boots which is soak in water over night then rub Vasoline into hands and pull on gloves and wear till dry. Planned gardening is good for the drying as the gloves get stretched every which way and end up a perfect fit.
 

GarageGuy

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#9
I've been bitten a couple of times by angle grinders. Now I wear leather gloves whenever I use one. Whenever it bites the leather glove, I smile and know it would have hurt without them. Same thing on my power wire brush wheels. They don't dig as deep, but they hurt just as bad. I buy the cheap Harbor Freight leather work gloves, so there are 10 pair laying around the shop wherever I might need them.

Glad there was no long term damage.

GG
 

Superburban

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#10
Been there, done that. It always seems to happen when you are in a hurry. When I picked up my drill press, I cut open the package that the tiedowns were in, and got myself real bad in the hand. Just wrapped a rag around it, and kept working. After we were on the highway heading home, I aske the wife to clean it for me, Man was she ******. It was big enough that it should have had stiches, but I had a good five hour drive ahead of me, so a cleaning, and clean rag, and duct tape was all it got. Still has a fair scar, but a lot better then I thought it would turn out.

Life goes on.
 

HBilly1022

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#11
Your going to like this ............. I was wearing leather gloves. Went right through them. Guess it could have been worse if I didn't have them on.
 

kvt

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#12
Problem is it is not always the fingers. Wait till you get hit in the midsection by a chunk of the disk. Found those guards do not really stop things. And cotton shirts do not stop things either. Now have a leather appron to wear
 

Ulma Doctor

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#13
ouch!
i have been shocked, burned, smashed, pinched, poked, and filleted at one time or another by all the equipment i work on.

i had a grinder incident, with a 7" HD angle grinder-
i was grinding a bit above knee level on a steel firebox for an industrial tar kettle.
i was replacing a 12" diameter x 10' heater tube and had to grind out the old welds after cutting with the Oxy/acetylene rig.
all was good until i got too far into the bore of the firebox and the grinder kicked back, hitting me on the inside of my thigh, mid thigh.
it cleared a 3"x 1/2" wide channel immediately in my leg , luckily it was mostly superficial, it went down about 1/4".
the funniest thing is that it didn't bleed much, the wound was basically cauterized by the grinding wheel.
the doctor picked carborundum out of the wound for 45 minutes before sewing me back up with 2 layers of stitches .
Good Times!

i'm glad that you didn't get it worse. take it easy!

chicks love scars :grin:
 

kwilliam

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#14
And how easy is it to go through the cord?
Especially when you have a few things lined up to cut through.
Just one careless swing and everything changes.
 

Lordbeezer

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#15
And please wear eye protection.grinder threw a small piece of metal over my reading glasses into eyeball.couldn't get it out myself.doctor got it out.cut out rust ring(waited too long).also merry Christmas to all
 

Silverbullet

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#17
Eeouch , the worst part the cuts from a grinding ,, cut off disc,,, dont cut clean they abrade . I've been cut dozens of times using them daily . Yes some needing stitches did I get them no. Couldn't afford the bill. But plenty of hydrogen peroxide and antibiotic ointment they heal. I'm sorry you got hurt please be careful , get some goggles uncomfortable but worth it . Even they don't stop everything.
 

Downwindtracker2

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#18
We put a lot of trust in the manufacturer of grinding wheels. They have been known to fly apart. A lot of the grinding seems to be at a height below our mid-section.

I've never removed the guard, still my cubbies have caught fire a few times and I'm always replacing the cloth backed work gloves because the cloth back has burnt away on one of the gloves. Always the same hand. At work they supplied fire resistant cubbies to the millwrights just because of that.
 

kvt

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#19
The cutting disk on 4.5 grinders can also be bad. Yes they are rated for the speed but like most things, They can fail. Even with the shield on pieces go flying at high speed. Have a scar just below the belly button where a piece hit the steel and then got me, even through the shirt.
Be careful and have a happy holiday.
 

NortonDommi

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#20
Apart from tight fitting gloves and safety glasses if I am doing a lot of cutting I also wear a forestry workers safety helmet. I find these are great especially when working outside in the Sun. They have attached ear muffs, a cloth down the back to stop crap going down the back of your neck and best of all a fine mesh visor that cannot fog up or get scratched.
One vitally important safety protection nobody has mentioned is a dust mask. Silicosis is deadly and grinding especially creates a lot of dust from the wheel and also microscopic pieces of steel that float in the air. My nostrils don't have a lot of hair in them to trap stuff due to various working conditions when younger so when,(very late), I realised what I was breathing and how much damage it was doing I decided to take particular care in making sure I was protected. I also tape muslin pads,(the type you strain must or jam through), over the air intake on my grinders and my grinders seem to last forever. A friend who works alongside me cutting glass shipping frames,(donation to social club, less than scrap value),for steel for projects goes through grinders at a steady rate. It is not just the brushes that wear, I've pulled some of his grinders apart,(usually after a spectacular meltdown), and the armatures are completely destroyed from the floating grit being sucked in. That same crap will end up in your lungs.
I hope you all had a wonderful Yule,(the Solstice was clouded over this year :frown 2:),and a happy thought for you Northerners. Spring is coming.
Cheers.
 

dave_r_1

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#21
Yah, I've made a habit now of putting on safety glasses and leather gloves when doing fabbing work. Have to get into a habit of wearing a leather coat/smock, as I've ruined a bunch of nice shirts by spraying them with sparks while angle grinding/cutting... The glasses habit is going well, as they fit under my welding helmet (so I don't have to take them off to weld), now I find myself forgetting to take them when I leave the shop.

What's stupid is I bought a ~$100 leather welding jacket, except it doesn't button together easily, the arms are too short and wearing it over a long sleeve shirt, it works the arms of the shirt up, which I find annoying... I have to go and buy another one that actually fits me.
 

petcnc

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#22
Been there, done exactly that a few years ago! It is amazing how fast the grinder removes flesh! A microsecond is enough!!! My doctor put 2 stiches and I was as good as new in a few weeks!
 

NortonDommi

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#23
Yah, I've made a habit now of putting on safety glasses and leather gloves when doing fabbing work. Have to get into a habit of wearing a leather coat/smock, as I've ruined a bunch of nice shirts by spraying them with sparks while angle grinding/cutting... The glasses habit is going well, as they fit under my welding helmet (so I don't have to take them off to weld), now I find myself forgetting to take them when I leave the shop.

What's stupid is I bought a ~$100 leather welding jacket, except it doesn't button together easily, the arms are too short and wearing it over a long sleeve shirt, it works the arms of the shirt up, which I find annoying... I have to go and buy another one that actually fits me.
Hello dave_r_1,
Try a leather apron of the type metal polishers and blacksmiths use,they are comfortable,do not restrict movement and in hot environments do not cause heatstroke. Arms tend not to get sparks plus you have ready access to pockets in normal cloths and they cover the most important part which can catch fire under some circumstances to the great hilarity of observers.
 
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rcaffin

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#25
I've been cut dozens of times using them daily . Yes some needing stitches did I get them no. Couldn't afford the bill.
The bill ...
Fortunately, ER in a public hospital in Australia is free. And very competent too.
I did have to pay for the crutches once (skiing accident with metal edges), but otherwise ... free.

Cheers
Roger
 

Cooter Brown

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#26
I almost cut the family jewels off with an angle grinder on my birthday about 7 years ago, didn't get deep enough to draw blood but I had a few clear marks and a huge hole in my pants. Things I learned that day..... NEVER GRIND WITH A CUTOFF WHEEL!!! and never use a grinder that doesn't say Metabo on it. Sorry guys no pictures.....
 
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dave_r_1

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#27
Hello dave_r_1,
Try a leather apron of the type metal polishers and blacksmiths use,they are comfortable,do not restrict movement and in hot environments do not cause heatstroke. Arms tend not to get sparks plus you have ready access to pockets in normal cloths and they cover the most important part which can catch fire under some circumstances to the great hilarity of observers.
I'll see what's available around here. An apron would likely work fine for grinding, but I'll also need something to go over my arms when welding.

With me, they go together. Weld. Damn. Cut. Move it a bit over, Weld. lather, rinse, repeat.
 

kevinpg

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#28
This happened a few months ago while I was doing some precision grinding with my angle grinder. When it happened I felt it right away but still had the grinder running and couldn't drop it. I had to shut it off and put it down safely, instead of throwing it aside. Then quickly go and clean all the crap out before the pain started. I contemplated going to see the doc but opted not to. I was concerned that it might not heal well since there was a bit of flesh missing and the white thing in the cut looked like it might be a nerve that could end up healing itself to the skin and that might be a long term issue with sensitivity. In the end it turned out fine although there is some sensitivity when it gets cold.

View attachment 246700
I just saw this. Grinders can be wicked, back in 78, June 19 to be exact, I was 17 years old about to turn 18 the next day and I was working tie-ends on a job outside Port Huron. We were working on 26" .380 wall pipe and I was grinding beads (root pass) for my journeyman with a Milwaulkee 7in grinder and no guards (we took them off to get room to grind the bottom of the bead. Contractor bought cheap grinding disks and as I was cleaning up the bottom, the disk shattered and the grinder kicked back, cut through my face shield, my safety glasses, had and into my skull above my right eye. I stopped the grinder and reached up to my eyebrow when blood running turned my vision red and my shirt was quickly soaked. Some of the hands held me back from a mirror with shouts of "he'll go into shock if he sees it". So the pipeman drove me 80 miles to the nearest ER and the doc sewed it up, 22 stitches outside and 20 inside. Can barely see it anymore. Happened faster than a rattler can strike. ever since, I have healthy respect for fast spinning disks. (I also never used a Milwaukee grinder again, square headed POS, never had the issue using B&D grinders, before or since)
 

7milesup

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#29
I almost cut the family jewels off with an angle grinder on my birthday about 7 years ago, didn't get deep enough to draw blood but I had a few clear marks and a huge hole in my pants. Things I learned that day..... NEVER GRIND WITH A CUTOFF WHEEL!!! and never use a grinder that doesn't say Metabo on it. Sorry guys no pictures.....

Errrmmmm....YIKES!!
 
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7milesup

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#30
My brother nearly cut his left arm off with a 7" angle grinder. Went down to the bone on the inside of his arm where all the tendons and nerves run. He spent hours in the O.R. getting his arm put back together. Doc said he would be lucky to get 50% of his arm's use back, but he worked hard in the rehab and ended up with 90-95%.

He has since passed away though from ##%*&@@@ brain cancer at age 59. I miss him dearly, every. single. day.
 
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