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POTD- PROJECT OF THE DAY: What Did You Make In Your Shop Today?

RJSakowski

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I installed a couple of inexpensive DROs on my 9x20. I can get them to register .0005" of movement even though the rated accuracy is .001" - which may actually be true but I didn't expect that they would increment in .0005". Not too bad for $60.

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Those inexpensive scales are actually 10 micron scales; .01mm or .0004". I used Yuriy's Touch DRO for 5the readout on mine and set the resolution to four decimal places. The readout steps in increments of .0004". Depending on how the math works in your readout (does it round to nearest .0005" or round down or round up), that last .0005" may not be accurate.
 

stioc

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OK, mounted the DRO screens properly. They have magnets on the back so just had to cut, bend and bolt on a backing plate on the splash shield. Then decided to build a tool height gauge. Wow the DRO made it so easy, I got it close with the saw, then for the final dimensions I just measured both the gauge and the correct tool height using caliper's dept gauge, subtracted the two to arrive at the delta, in my case .015". Then touched off, zero'd out the DRO, backed up, dialed in .015" on the DRO and took the cut. Done! No back and forth measuring, no eye balling, and no backlash issues. I had no idea how effective this simple and inexpensive mod could be to help my lathe work. I also ended up using my saddle-stop for turning that I recently made on my CNC mill. Truth be told, I never cared much for these little tools, widgets and jigs before but they definitely make a difference in speed, convenience and even accuracy. I'll be on the look out for more handy things others have made whether for the grinder, bandsaw, mill or the lathe.

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JimDawson

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I bored a couple of timing sprockets today, these are for the turret drive and live tooling drive for my CNC lathe project. Normally something like this would not be worthy of posting, but in this case they required a bit of thought to hang onto for boring. There wasn't really enough hub to hang onto and they are a bit of a PITA to dial in under the best of conditions, you have to have the bore concentric with the OD of the teeth, and you can't chuck on the flanges. So I tried something a little different this time.:cautious:

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First some pie jaws for my 3 jaw. Didn't really need full pie jaws to hang onto the sprocket since i'm working in the center of the chuck but I might need them for a large hollow part someday :)

So start with a piece of 1/2'' aluminum plate. This is bolted down to two thickness of 3/4'' with 3/8-16 x 1 1/2 cap screws. Drilled & tapped the MDF. Normal drill for 3/8-16 is 5/16'' but in MDF I go one size smaller to get 100% thread depth. You can tighten the cap screws pretty tight without stripping if you have about 3 diameters or more of thread depth. The MDF is bolted down to the table and the top piece is screwed to the lower piece with drywall screws. The two Phillips head deck screws held the plate in position while drilling the holes. The center bolt goes down to a T-nut, adds a bit of security for the outside roughing operation.
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And this is what happens when an end mill gums up with aluminum, it just kind of melts through the plate.:confused 3:
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I should have been watching a bit closer, but I had my back to it working on the lathe. I basically did everything wrong here :rolleyes: Using a 4 flute rougher rather than a 2 or 3 flute. Not enough coolant flow, let the chips build up, in addition to pushing it kind of hard. It actually overloaded the motor and tripped out the VFD, first time that has ever happened. :eek: But wait, there's more...:eagerness: The VFD fault output WAS NOT (it is now) tied into the E-stop circuit so the servos kept happily running along until I hit the E-stop. Of course moving the parts around and knocking the head out of tram. :mad: So tram the head, find 0 again and finish the cut. Surprisingly, the endmill did not break, nor was it damaged by the aluminum welding to it, cleaned right up and I finished the job with it.

Finishing the profile. I could have built the pie jaws with a drill press and a band saw, but it's just too easy when you have a CNC mill sitting there. I'm getting lazy in my old age.;)

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And the mill work is done.
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So next over to the lathe and prep them for use. First something in the center to you can load the jaws outward when tightening the cap screws. This is the ring I turned to preload the chuck jaws for boring the center to size. I should note here that my chuck jaws are removable 2 piece jaws, with single piece jaws you would not be able to do this. Interesting camera perspective, that's an 8 inch chuck, makes my hand and 5/16'' allen wrench look huge.

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Then using the same ring in this case, tighten the jaws down on the ring to load them for boring to size. In this case the bore is a bit smaller than the ring because I needed clearance for the flange on the sprocket. So make the bore exactly the same size as the OD of the sprocket teeth. That way the sprocket is captured all the way around and held concentric in both axes, just like a collet.

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So now ready to bore the sprockets to 22mm. I made them on size because I want them to shrink on. I'll heat them up pretty hot to install. Did pretty good, hit the target dimension dead on for one of them, and 0.0001'' under on the other. They started out at ~15mm bore.

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And done with this part of the operation
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So next is the keyways. the keys are 6mm and I don't have a 6mm broach, so time to make a quick keyway cutter. I grabbed a trashed brazed carbide bit, drilled a 0.358 hole (T drill) in the shank to clear the edges of a 1/4'' HSS lathe bit, and put a set screw in the end to hold the bit in place.
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Then I ground the 1/4'' bit into a 6mm keyway cutter. I just did this by hand, grind a little bit, measure, rinse, repeat until it's correct. I managed to hit 6.01mm and decided that's close enough.
Cut the tool bit to length. Then just set up in the lathe and pretend that I'm a shaper. :grin:
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So tomorrow back to the rest of the lathe project.
 
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ACHiPo

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Made a couple table covers for my new mill out of some scrap 3/4" walnut plywood. Gave them a coat of shellac to keep the walnut and steel from mixing (not sure if walnut has anything in it that would cause corrosion of the table, but the shellac should prevent it if it does).IMG_1041.JPG

Got my new Kurt vise and mill all trammed and square.
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Started to rebuild my new-to-me Albrecht chuck, but got stuck without a way to bore holes the right size in the two aluminum clamps needed to hold parts for reassembly.
 

zmotorsports

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wouldn't attaching the cooler to the exhaust pipe actually pick up more heat from the exhaust? I would think you would put it away from a heat generating component.

EDIT: it's been pointed out that it's not an exhaust pipe..
Not sure Jeff, but it looks likes it hanging under the front part of the engine. maybe that is a tube that is part of the frame. ???
No thats an exhaust pipe for sure
Nope im wrong now that i looked closer at it. It looks like its attached to the nose of the vehicle. The giveaway is you can see the belts and pulleys. Prob support for the radiator. @Bill W. @woodchucker
Agreed, in the standard view the image info blocks that, but using the full size function, I see that now.
Obviously not an exhaust pipe.

Guys sorry, I've been off-site for a couple of days. The cooler is NOT attached to the exhaust pipe. In an earlier post that I believe was on the old "what did you do in your shop today" I mentioned that round tube that serves as a crossmember spanning left frame rail to right frame rail at the front of the Jeep. This is what I mounted the oil cooler to.

Thanks for looking and I should have carried that information over to this thread but I forgot the other one was closed/locked.

Mike
 

stioc

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After 13yrs of ownership my HF 4x6 bandsaw finally cuts perfectly square! Yes, I purchased this as one of my two very first metal fabrication tools back in 2004, along with my Hobart welder. It never cut square no matter what I tried, I gave up on it and bought an abrasive saw, then a plasma cutter but always found the bandsaw more convenient especially for bar stock and tubing. Then recently upon looking into it again (after a few years of metal experience lol) I realized that the reason it never cut square was because it's missing two major adjustment points, the upper and lower blade guides don't twist/swivel to allow the blade to be vertical. So I checked the other HF saws and sure enough they all have this adjustment. It baffles me why this 'Taiwanese' saw didn't have one? Then as I started thinking about shimming it to get the blade correct I happened upon someone's YT video who came up with this idea and it works great. He drilled and tapped two holes and used set screws for the twisting adjustment. Sure enough, that got me pretty close but now I was on a mission so I did the same thing for the upper guide and I couldn't believe how accurate this saw cuts now even with an old blade that's been cutting at the wrong angle for years.

The set screws are on the (black) upper and lower blade guides - near the knob and the hex bolt respectively:


The blade sits perfectly square to the vise now- parallel and perpendicular:


A test cut, flipped the cut piece 180deg and the fit-up is about as perfect as a bandsaw can make:


Hope this helps those with these odd-ball HF 4x6 37151 bandsaws from the past (presumably a bad run?)
 

HBilly1022

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Not much machining in my shop for a while. I've been fighting with a leaking fitting on my skidsteer. Should have been an easy job to remove the fitting and replace it with a new one. But 3 things made sure that wasn't going to happen. Firstly, as someone on the tractor forum noted; a skidsteer is 10 lbs of stuff crammed into a 5 lb bag; secondly the fitting was located under the cab in an area where 2 people are needed or one guy with 4 arms that can all contort, in order to reach the part and thirdly the jam nut holding on was extremely tight. I was at this for a few days, for a few hours each day until I gave up in frustration. I ended up making some tools to get the job done and was finally successful. Sometimes stubbornness pays off.

Here is a pic of the fancy tools I made and the fitting that caused me so much grief.
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The tool on the left was made so I could reach the jam nut and use a ratchet wrench on it. But even with a 1/2" breaker bar and a box wrench on the end of the breaker bar I couldn't get the nut to break free. The 3/8" thick steel plate the wrench was made of started to open up. The second tool is the winner and got the job done. It involved some machining.:) Even with this it took about 15 minutes of struggling to get the special socket over the fitting bend and onto the jam nut. There was just so much stuff in the way. After about 5 seconds with the impact wrench it finally broke free. The skidsteer is now out of the shop and seems to be working fine.
 

FOMOGO

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Welcome to the wonderful world of hydraulics. Replaced all the hoses on the rear portion of my backhoe a few years back. 12 good sized hoses packed into an incredibly tight area. Had replaced two a few yrs before, and of course it was one of those that was leaking. The others all had 1979 factory tags on them (7k hrs on the machine). Rebuilt the loader valve body and that had mostly solid steel lines which are even more fun. Nice job on the socket. Mike
 

T Bredehoft

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A couple of weeks ago my boss, (elder son, runs a model airplane supply) told me he wanted a way of fabricating springs for a gizmo he was offering to his customers. Spring to be made from 36" or .006 music wire. I spent a week or so thinking about it and another week building it. Here it is.

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The springs look like this. I used shorter lengths (except the long one) for sampling. The crank on the right turns a 100 tooth gear which engages a 10 tooth gear, spinning the mandrel which pulls the wire through the friction device and around itself. As the spring accumulates it pushes the 'sled' to the left until the entire wire is wound around the mandrel.

Sorry about the focus of the following photo, cheap camera. The coin in the picture is a US quarter. I didn't count the turns but that long spring should have in excess of 130 turns.

009 springs and a quarter.jpg
 
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Boswell

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Nice looking Spring Winder Tom.
 

PHPaul

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Slight thread drift from a guy that aspires to someday qualify as a rank amateur: Once the spring is wound from piano wire, I assume it requires some sort of heat treatment to actually be "springy" (note the technical fluency...:beguiled: )
 

RJSakowski

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If you start with piano wire, it is already spring tempered. No further heat treat necessary.
When the spring is wound, the wire is overstretched, i.e coiled too tightly. When the tension is released, it will spring back, increasing the coil diameter somewhat. Typically, you start with a slightly smaller mandrel so the relaxed diameter meets your requirement.

A refinement is to add a wire guide that fits up close to the mandrel. This prevents the already wound coils from unwinding, requiring less tension on the wire and having less spring-back. This is especially useful when winding heavier gauge springs.

One of the coolest ways to make a spring is to push the wire against an angled block. The wire will form a coil, the diameter determined by the angle of the block. This works great for making conical springs, something that I struggled with winding over a mandrel.
 

PHPaul

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Ah. Thank you. Learn something every day if you're not careful.

So the examples in your post are what I would call "tension springs" rather than "compression springs", yes?

Is the process of making a compression spring similar, just spacing the coils further apart?
 

RJSakowski

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Ah. Thank you. Learn something every day if you're not careful.

So the examples in your post are what I would call "tension springs" rather than "compression springs", yes?

Is the process of making a compression spring similar, just spacing the coils further apart?
Essentially. You can stretch a close wound spring to make a compression spring. It is usually nor possible to make a tension spring by compressing though. You have to deform the wire beyond its elastic limit to get a permanent deformation and there is always spring-back. When I make compression springs, I will usually close wind them and stretch as require.

It is also possible to wind the spring for a coil pitch other than close with the lathe. This can be done rather precisely using the lead screw to advance the wind. For instance, you could wind two turns close then engage the half nuts for ten turns at a pitch of .1 inches, then disengage the half nuts for the last two turns to give something approximating a store bought compression spring.
 

PHPaul

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Ah. Again, thanks very much for the lesson. I occasionally need a specific spring for a modeling project and sort through my stash looking for something that's "close enough". I think I'll acquire some piano wire and try a few of my own just as a learning project.
 

bfd

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working on a 3x24 belt sander for my brother in law he had his stolen from his truck in palm springs. I had an extra that needed a new handle, cord and kid plate on the bottom bill
 

Ianagos

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working on a 3x24 belt sander for my brother in law he had his stolen from his truck in palm springs. I had an extra that needed a new handle, cord and kid plate on the bottom bill
Palm Springs is a strange place but I never took it for the kind of place where somebody would steal a belt sander though. Good on you for getting him another.
 

T Bredehoft

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It is also possible to wind the spring for a coil pitch other than close with the lathe.
Thank you for that, RJ, I've been trying to space them out, never thought of using the lead screw.
 

DoogieB

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I've been trying out some accessories I bought for the rotary table this winter.

rotary_1.jpg

It's a Vertex HV-8 8" rotary table. It fits pretty well on the 8x30 table of my mill.

Mounted a MT3 -> ER32 adapter into the rotary table. Had to make a thick washer and dig-out a metric bolt for a mini drawbar. It was cheap enough although the .002 runout isn't anything to write home about. It should do for many applications but for fussy stuff I will have to use a center + dog.

rotary_2.jpg

Also got the DP-2 dividing plate kit made for this rotary table. Had to do a bit of fitting (the crank wouldn't fit on the shaft) but it's working well now. I did briefly consider obtaining the popular BS-1 dividing head, but I have enough trouble keeping the rust off this thing without having another rarely used piece of tooling. Compared to the BS-1, the table doesn't pivot but those big plates support all divisions 100 and below, whereas most of the smaller heads start having trouble with divisions over 50. It's not a problem for this setup, but notice the plate's considerable overhang at the edge of the table.

Also picked-up a tailstock. It's not from Vertex, but this one was a bit cheaper and seems nicer. The height is adjustable with a knob and it has enough range for the rotary table at the top end and extends down to support collet blocks (on parallels) in the vise which should come in quite handy. I was also surprised the supplied mounting bolts fit in the smaller slots of this mill table.

Have a small job for the table tomorrow and then it's back onto the shelf. I'm so glad I didn't buy a bigger table as this thing is heavy enough to lug around.
 

RJSakowski

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Another note on springs. Lee Spring has an excellent online catalog for springs. They have literally tens of thousands of springs listed, along with engineering data. While their minimum order usually isn't practical for a hobbyist, they have excellent engineering data which will provide useful information for someone who wants to roll their own.
http://www.leespring.com/
 

Ray C

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Just made a simple tap driver that fits in a drill chuck on the mill. It could be used in a drill press too with the speed turned down low.

All total, I've got about 150 holes to drill tap in stainless steel. The driver is simply chucked-up and tightened on the round shaft part. The tap is a slip fit in the bore. The slot in the top accommodates the square head of the tap. When the tap is pushed all the way in, it gets driven by the square. You just keep hand pressure on the spindle to keep it engaged. When the tap gets to the right depth, just retract the spindle and it disengages and stops driving. To back the tap out, just reverse the motor, apply downward pressure on the spindle until it engages the tap again and it backs out of the hole.

The tap can now be driven by the flats (driven by hand pressure on the spindle to keep it engaged).
IMG_20180324_115024[1].jpg

When it hits full depth, retract the spindle to disengage the flats.
IMG_20180324_115054[1].jpg

EDIT: Here's another picture to show that the driver guides the tap nicely due to a slip fit between the body of the tap and the bore.
IMG_20180324_122108[1].jpg

... About 50 holes down and counting. At 90RPM, the process is very simple and uneventful. No broken taps so far. These are all thru-holes on 316 stainless about 7/16" thick. All the 3/8" holes are done. When some new taps arrive, I've got 50 each of 5/16 and 1/4.

Ray
 
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Brento

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Its cool but im confused on how it works exactly.
 

woodchucker

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so it keeps the tap centered in the chuck, if you stop the feed, it will pull itself out of the holder and disengage. The hole is drilled not all the way through, then a swipe is taken with an end mill to create the flats and expose the hole as a through hole. if you dont' feed at all, as soon as the tap moves enough to release from the flats, it stops turning. simple
or as Ray says pull back on the quill and it stops.
 
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