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Rust Protection - Boeshield or Fluid Film?

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hamholfarm

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#1
Hello,

I would like to know from those who have used either product of your opinions. If you have used both, I would like to know which you prefer and why. My use would be for mostly metalworking equipment and a few pieces of woodworking equipment in an unheated/un-air-conditioned shop (pole building). The temperature fluctuates from below freezing in winter, to possibly 100*F in the summer and with high humidity.

I wrote to Customer Service at "theruststore dot com" and asked which product would be best for my situation, Boeshield, Fluid Film, or Bull Frog Rust Blocker. This is the response I received.

“You can think of T-9 as a wax, and Fluid Film as a Grease. T-9 will remain liquid to the touch if left thick, and will form a micro thin waxy layer if the excess is removed. Fluid Film will remain about the consistency of Vaseline. Either can be used well in ways or sliding parts.”

“Rust Blocker sets to a thick candle wax consistency and I would not recommend it for your situation.”




I am still unsure of which product would be the best for protection, as well as easy to use.

I appreciate your assistance.

Chip
 

rwm

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#2
I have both Boeshield and Fluid Film on the shelf and use both. The descriptions above are good. The thing I don't like about Fluid Film is the strong lanolin odor. Some may not mind that. I use Boeshield on tools that I use or handle with some frequency. I use Fluid Film for things that sit unused. For example, my table saw will probably be idle all winter. I covered it with a layer of Fluid film. They both seem to work equally well but I have not done a formal test. The Fluid Film generally should be wiped off before use.
Robert
 
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Ed ke6bnl

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#3
I have a gallon of the fluid film and it is like enamel paint and I called fluid film and they said I could thin it with vegetable oil and I have done that and made it usable. the fluid film in the spray can is then But not sure of its protection as thin as it is. But since I started to watch some videos on auto work many times in the rust belt the majority of them use spray fluid film on everything axles bearing lug nuts and any metal surface so I am no using it and testing
 

rwm

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#4
I forgot. Both of my products I use the spray can.
Robert
 

Downunder Bob

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#5
I use a product called INOX MX3. I use it as a cutting fluid on the lathe and when drilling holes etc.. Its also a very good penetrant and rust preventer. As I'm using it on the lathe everything is covered in a light film, and nothing is going rusty, all still shiny. I get it in a 5Lt. container and decant it into a couple of small squirt bottles that I use for everything. Far superior to rp7, wd40, crc etc.
 

Bob Korves

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#6
Google Ed's Red. Homemade, cheap, works great. I make mine to a recipe of
1 part anhydrous lanolin (from eBay)
1 part ATF
5 parts mineral spirits
Heat the lanolin carefully until it is completely melted, then mix in the other two ingredients. That mixture works well for everything in the shop -- tools, machines, and metal stock. Apply a wet coat and let it dry. It leaves a nearly invisible, dry to the touch coating.
 

C-Bag

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#7
Google Ed's Red. Homemade, cheap, works great. I make mine to a recipe of
1 part anhydrous lanolin (from eBay)
1 part ATF
5 parts mineral spirits
Heat the lanolin carefully until it is completely melted, then mix in the other two ingredients. That mixture works well for everything in the shop -- tools, machines, and metal stock. Apply a wet coat and let it dry. It leaves a nearly invisible, dry to the touch coating.
That sounds really promising Bob. I'll have to try that when my can of Fluidfilm finally gives up the ghost. I have and use all the different Boeshield and Fluid Film in a can. Fluid film works the best for me and I'm close to the ocean. I also use the Frog foam squares for stuff in a storage container and it's incredible. But doesn't work for machinery because it works best in a contained space. If you have smaller stuff that you can put in a plastic sealed tote un rusted it will stay perfect for as long as the tote is sealed. I found some totes with a soft seal that work perfect at Target. Those parts I powdercoat so I can't put anything on it so Frog is perfect.
 

Bob Korves

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#8
That sounds really promising Bob. I'll have to try that when my can of Fluidfilm finally gives up the ghost.
It is actually quite similar to Fluidfilm, except for the cost... And you can tweak the recipe in any direction that makes sense to meet your needs.
 

ddickey

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#9
I use this,
LPS 3 Premier Rust Inhibitor
Does a fine job.
 

Mitch Alsup

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#10
I protect my machines with ISO 64 hydraulic oil.

Ed's Red would be a first choice for longer term rust prevention.
 

C-Bag

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#11
It is actually quite similar to Fluidfilm, except for the cost... And you can tweak the recipe in any direction that makes sense to meet your needs.
So did you tweek the recipe? When I was in the San Joaquin valley I mostly didn't have to worry about rust like over here. I guess I'm odd as this smell of wet sheep that everybody notes about Fluidfilm doesn't bother me even though I have a very good sense of smell. Now cigarettes or bad car exhaust, THAT gets me.
 

Downunder Bob

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#12
I use a product called INOX MX3. I use it as a cutting fluid on the lathe and when drilling holes etc.. Its also a very good penetrant and rust preventer. As I'm using it on the lathe everything is covered in a light film, and nothing is going rusty, all still shiny. I get it in a 5Lt. container and decant it into a couple of small squirt bottles that I use for everything. Far superior to rp7, wd40, crc etc.

BY the way it is actually recommended by the manufacturer as a cutting fluid for Stainless and aluminium, but I also use it on steel, and anything else that needs it, avoids the need to have one for this and one for that. And its also a dewatering fluid and lubricant. They also make a range of other lubricants including food grade ones.
 

AJB

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#13
I live in the Deep South and our high humidity and warm temps cause tools will rust tools practically overnight. I have tried lots of protectants, but stopped when I discovered WD40 Specialist Long Term Corrosion Inhibitor. The stuff works, and it lasts a long time!

It sounds similar to the description of T-9 in it goes on wet and stays wet if a heavy coat is applied. However, it seems to dry if a light coat is applied. Either way seems to protect equally well.

Here is a link to a thorough test of lubricants and rust inhibitors that is really good: https://www.shootersforum.com/gun-cleaning/91566-results-gun-care-product-evaluation.html
 
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hman

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#14
Google Ed's Red. Homemade, cheap, works great. I make mine to a recipe of
1 part anhydrous lanolin (from eBay)
1 part ATF
5 parts mineral spirits
Heat the lanolin carefully until it is completely melted, then mix in the other two ingredients. That mixture works well for everything in the shop -- tools, machines, and metal stock. Apply a wet coat and let it dry. It leaves a nearly invisible, dry to the touch coating.
About a year ago, I set out to find a less expensive alternative to Fluid Film. Bought some anhydrous lanolin from the Bay and tested it with various solvents, to figger out which would work best. Several worked OK, but turpentine turned out to work best - dissolved the greatest amount of lanolin per volume of solvent. Not a bad smell, either. Didn't go much further, as I moved from humid Oregon to dry Arizona soon thereafter.

Nevertheless, I'll give Ed's Red a try. Thanks for the post!
 

Bob Korves

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So did you tweek the recipe?
Yes, I did tweak it a bit, but I do not remember exactly what I changed. I am not using it for cleaning barrels, so I tweaked it toward anti-rust properties and toward a decent protective film thickness.

When I was in the San Joaquin valley I mostly didn't have to worry about rust like over here.
The Sacramento valley is pretty kind to things that rust, but eventually gets them if ignored. It is just one of the good reasons for living here.
 

ThinWoodsman

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#16
I keep Fluid Film around but stopped using it on the machines and tools in the shop. Just too messy - everything is covered in a gummy residue that accumulates dust, swarf, bugs, you name it. LPS-3 is similar, a bit better behaved but about three times the price.

I'm out of the rust season now but will probably do a homebrew next year. Not likely to be Red's as I'm a bit put off by the lanolin - so far my experience has been that you might as well use cosmoline for all the work you have to do cleaning the machinery before use.
 

hamholfarm

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#17
I appreciate all of the reply's so far.
I have read a good deal on Ed's Red from the various firearm and reloading groups which I visit. However, I never heard of it being used to protect machinery. I think I may just make up a batch and see how it works.

Thank you!
 

hamholfarm

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#18
Is Ed's Red thin enough to be sprayed through a typical squirt bottle?
 

Bob Korves

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I keep Fluid Film around but stopped using it on the machines and tools in the shop. Just too messy - everything is covered in a gummy residue that accumulates dust, swarf, bugs, you name it. LPS-3 is similar, a bit better behaved but about three times the price.

I'm out of the rust season now but will probably do a homebrew next year. Not likely to be Red's as I'm a bit put off by the lanolin - so far my experience has been that you might as well use cosmoline for all the work you have to do cleaning the machinery before use.
The recipe I posted in post #6 dries to a clear, non sticky surface. I cannot tell it is there by handling it or looking at it. There is no odor after it is dry in a couple hours, and never a lanolin odor.
 

hamholfarm

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Bob,

Is your version of Ed's Red spray-able in a squirt bottle? Does it solidify after it cools down?

Thanks
 

CluelessNewB

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#21
I use Johnson paste wax on my woodworking tool tops. A thin coat rubbed in well once a year does the trick for me. If it's cold heating lightly with a heat gun makes quick work of rubbing it in. My shop is only heated when needed during the winter and never air conditioned. What I like about it for woodworking tools is it doesn't need to be removed before use. I do use T9 on some of hand tools, wiping off any excess. I tried T9 on the top of my table saw but found that it always left residue on wood even if I wiped it down very well. Completely removing it before each use was not acceptable to me. A 1lb can of paste wax costs about $7 and lasts a long time. I've been on my first can for about 15 years.
 

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#22
Having read all ,your pro's and con's. I'll stick with my INOX MX3, Ok it's not cheap but neither was my lathe, and a little goes a long way, and it does work. Also being useful for a number of things means I don't have to keep other stuff around.

BTW I did see one recipe for Ed's Red on the internet that includes Inox or Lanox in the recipe. Lanox is a partner product and yes it does contain lanolin.

I notice a number of members complain about the smell of lanolin, It occurs to me that as Americans generally don't eat lamb, and very few sheep are farmed in US, whereas here in Aus we have many times more sheep than people, and we regularly eat sheep meat which would explain why the smell of lanolin does not bother us, in fact we often use it to soften our skin in our desert like climate.
 

Bob Korves

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#23
Bob,

Is your version of Ed's Red spray-able in a squirt bottle? Does it solidify after it cools down?

Thanks
My version was only developed for my own usage in my home shop. Anybody is welcome (and encouraged!) to try making some and using it as much as they want to.
 

hamholfarm

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#24
Does anyone have a spray-able version of Ed's Red they would share?

Thanks
 

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#25
Pump spray is not the way I'd go, they don't hold up. I use these metal one that you pressurize with a compressor. image.jpeg
 

hamholfarm

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#26
Yes, I agree.

Thanks

Pump spray is not the way I'd go, they don't hold up. I use these metal one that you pressurize with a compressor.
 

Bob Korves

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#27
Does anyone have a spray-able version of Ed's Red they would share?


Thanks
My version should be spray-able, it is light bodied, clear, and has nothing floating around in it if the lanolin is fully melted when mixed with the hydrocarbons. That might change if the temperature is brought down to below sunny California temperatures. I have not tried to spray it, I find many to most sprays wasteful and messy.
 

ThinWoodsman

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#28
Pump spray is not the way I'd go, they don't hold up. I use these metal one that you pressurize with a compressor.
Those Sure Shots are great. Might give Bob Korves' recipe a go in one.
 

C-Bag

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#29
me too when one goes dry. I've got a super penetrant mix in the big one( 50-50 ATF + acetone great stuff!) and way lube in the little one. Both those Sure Shots are over 40yrs old and just keep on squirtin'. I think I've got another little Sure Shot around here somewhere so maybe that's the one I'll try some Ed's Red in.
 

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#30
I use and make the eds red for gun cleaning a gallon mixed up if I remember the last I made came out to about $15.00 with enough other ingredients to almost make another gallon . The lanolin is what's best for rust proofing . By the oil or the paste and smear it on. The farmers who had sheep wondered why where ever the sheep rubbed metal it never got rusty ,, rocket science right Yes at one time in my life I cleaned some of the most valuable guns used. And was always recommended and given good tip money. On average a three day shoot would net three hundred dollars and pay my entry fees to shoot. Long days but it kept me being able to afford to shoot competition trap for years.
 
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