Show us your Logan lathes!

pestilence

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Jun 23, 2011
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I had no idea this thread existed until now. I'll be posting my 1950s 922 later tonight when I get home :)
 

pestilence

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This is my 1951 model 922. It has an 11" swing, 55" bed, and is 36" between centers. I got it for $900 already restored off of craigslist from a guy who didn't have room for his machines any more. I think that was a great deal for Arizona, but I had to buy it out of his storage locker and it was in pieces. I've had it since 2011 but had no room (or power) to set it up myself until my shop was completed this spring. The only things wrong with it were broken teeth on the bull and back gears, but with luck and patience I found good ones cheapish on eBay. It runs great, but I'm just starting to learn the ropes and haven't got the skill yet to determine if the ways are very worn or how good the spindle bearings are. I've managed to get quite good precision out of it already though.

It came with a little old school tooling, three and four jaw chucks, and a baseplate. I added the Chinese tool post and the two steadies and I have most of an original taper attachment. I'm just missing the cross slide. I'm going to complete the casting shown in the third pic rather than get an original though. The atlas compound on the chip tray might end up on the new cross slide rather than the original. We'll see.

IxPJSjq.jpg
tKeGWZ1.jpg
ZgeLTtK.jpg
 

epanzella

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Apr 8, 2013
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Wow, this thread surely brings back memories. I just had to dig out some pics of my old Logan. It was an old beat up machine but I made a lot of stuff with it. A relocation forced me to sell it and despite having a modern machine now, I still miss my old buddy.

LOGAN LATHE.JPG LOGAN TOOL HOLDER.JPG
 

gjmontll

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Nov 5, 2012
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Hi Epanzella,
I like your gray and red color scheme. That's how I'm doing my in-progress restoration.
See my "Greg's Logan 820 Restoration" thread in this folder.
Here is today's shot, after finishing the QCGB overhaul.
qcgb reassm 13.jpg

Greg

qcgb reassm 13.jpg
 

epanzella

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Hi Epanzella,
I like your gray and red color scheme. That's how I'm doing my in-progress restoration.
See my "Greg's Logan 820 Restoration" thread in this folder.
Here is today's shot, after finishing the QCGB overhaul.
View attachment 64982

Greg
Hey Greg,
I can't take credit for the color scheme, I got it that way. I owe that machine a lot. It was my first lathe and it took me from "knowing absolutely nothing" all the way to "knowing almost nothing". Your restoration is really looking good.
Ed P
 

gjmontll

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MBfrontier,

It looks like you also have a great project underway. Yours is two years older than my Logan 820, but looks to be in better starting condition.
(See my posting in this thread two messages back, and my "Greg's Logan 820 Restoration" thread in this same folder.)

Question: In your photo, what am I seeing to the left and below the chuck, on the front of the headstock? Even with magnifying, I can't make it out. But I'm guessing it may be a motor reversing switch. I see a drum switch down in the lower left, but maybe, like my machine, the drum switch maybe does forward in both positions? Given that my only chuck (at this time) is an 8" 4-jaw, that's probably a safety feature.)

I hope you are enjoying the overhaul as much as I am with mine,
Greg
 

Redlineman

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Jul 27, 2013
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Hey Greg;

I've been researching them.

What you are seeing is the all too rare original power switch. For some reason everyone seemed to dislike these, as there are virtually none of them I've seen that are intact and functional. There may be some electrical versatility in the later drum switch that Logan went to using, and I am totally ignorant of electrics, but I would think the original switch was quite effective. Does it have to do with 3-phase? On Montgomery Ward lathes, I believe some of these were simple on/off switches, and they remained in this location for some time. I'm guessing that one of the premium features of the "higher end" Logan versions that came out a few years later was a reversing function in the same switch location. The early Logans used this switch, but after about 1943 they seem to have transitioned to the much more common drum switch mounted on the rear primary drive guard frame.

The first attachment is a 1947 MW lathe with the simple on/off version. The second shows the Logan version with reversing available.

I am keenly interested in purchasing a very good condition original switch plate for my 1942 200 #15235 restoration. If anyone ever sees one, I'd appreciate a ping!

LoganWards1947.JPG Logan200switch.jpg
 

MBfrontier

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Dec 14, 2013
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gjmontll,
You're right, it is a forward/reverse switch and it does work. I read about the potential for the chuck to fly off the lathe when reversed so I keep it in forward and haven't messed with it other than checking to see if it works. I attached a picture for a better look. This lathe has a 1/2 horse motor with an Atlas nameplate on it so this forward/reverse switch may have been attached to the leg when and if the motor was changed. The on/off switch is on the headstock casting with a plate that has forward/off/reverse markings but only functions for turning the lathe on and off.

IMG_0782.JPG

IMG_0782.JPG
 
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mhguy

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Dec 10, 2013
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Hi,
I have had my Logan 957 lathe for about 45 years. My father originally bought it in 1966 when it was several years old and I later inherited it. One of the first modifications I made in the early '70's was to replace the two 4 step cone v-belt pulleys in the base with a variable speed split pulley drive. This has worked out very well. I have since been able to dial speeds over a wider range than the original pulleys provided. I finally replaced the v-belts for the first time a few weeks ago. A few days ago I replaced the 5/8-11 threaded rod I originally installed to control the speed with a left hand threaded one. I am tired of turning the speed crank to the left to increase speed.

In the years since, I initially used the lathe in a couple of sideline businesses and as a home hobby shop tool since. I recently cleaned it up (I had let it get far too grungy), bought a quick change tool holder and a few associated accessories. I am now trying to get my whole shop well organized and fixed up.


lathe.jpg
This is my Logan 957 lathe as she sits in my shop.​



Lathedrive.jpg
This is the variable speed drive I installed in the early '70's. The pulley came from Grainger's.

Thanks for all the help offered on this forum.

Dick

lathe.jpg Lathedrive.jpg
 

RandyM

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FANTASTIC Guys! Keep 'em coming. You all have some very nice equipment. Thank you for posting.
 

Artemetra

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Jul 30, 2011
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This is a fun thread so I wanted to get in. My Logan 820 came from Monticello, Utah, owned by Harry Randall my wife's grandpa. It sat in a chicken coop for years so I heard. It's a 1946. When I first inherited it my thought was that it was a beater. The scroll on the 3-jaw was toast, that chuck WAS quite the beater. But after watching Tubal Cain's YouTube vid on using a 4-jaw chuck (where you get two keys and dial the work in from loosening one side and tightening the other at the same time), I went to try it and hey! the 4-jaw is in perfect shape! So I figured maybe there was hope for the old 820 after all. The apron was sludged up solid and there were 3 different gears including the bull gear with teeth missing. Dry bearings. Rotten pivot bushings, you know, all the stuff that comes from 70 years. So after going through it all, it's golden. The work in the picture is of some 7075 spacer tubes that go in a special milling machine called the "Millisect". It's a pathology workflow tool to dissect tissue from glass slides, like FFPE type biopsy slides. So the lathe can do precision work, I can hold half a thou on these parts.

Lathe 3_8 to 5_16 turning w live ctr.jpg Logan 820_1.jpg
 

KMinAF

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Oct 15, 2014
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Logan model 400. Works great and learning a lot of "old school" techniques. Next project is to try cutting some threads.

DSCF6678.JPG
 

herbet999

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Oct 24, 2014
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I'm a new Logan owner. Was searching for info and found this thread. 2525 VLH

20150109_194247.jpg

20150109_194247.jpg
 

spitfire_er

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Jan 18, 2015
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Hey Guys,

I'm new here, but have looked at this thread several times over the past year. Owned 3 9" south bends, and one Logan 210, Now I have a Logan 922 11x36". It's a nice lathe for it's size, but I'm hoping to get another larger Clausing 5900 series lathe.

I got the 922 about 5 months ago. Was in decent shape, but it does have a few issues I need to work on yet. Just put a new Phase II QCTP on it last week. Which was a huge improvement from the old lantern. I mainly bought mine for doing gun barrels on, but I'm have done more odd ball projects on it than gunsmith work. I want to make sure everything is set up how I want it before I start spinning barrels. Planning to have it powder coated some day and have the ways reground. I can't resize my photo, but here's a video I made on it.

[video=youtube_share;csgMAo4WW6o]http://youtu.be/csgMAo4WW6o[/video]
 

Wiredodger60

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Sep 5, 2014
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You really did a nice refurb on that 6561 Logan!

Have a a question for you if you've got time.

Is is there a way to tighten up the carriage feed. I've got a 6561 and its a little weak in travel from tail to head but robust from head to tail stock. Any ideas?

thanks.

Wiredodger60
 

Gadgetologist

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Dec 14, 2015
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I just bought this Logan model 1925 with an 8" chuck and other tools. It was from a research lab to only build prototypes. It was never in manufacturing or a school. It has a nice AB control box to provide motor reverse. I am excited to finally get a larger lathe. To this point I have been using 2 small Austrian made Unimat 3 s which have been great, but certainly limited.

image.jpg image.jpg image.jpg image.jpg image.jpg image.jpg image.jpg
 
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Gadgetologist

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Holescreek,

Want can you tell me about the stops on your lathe that I have identified with arrows. Did you buy and install them or make them? Any details would be great.

Logansale 001.jpg
 

CluelessNewB

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The thing on the left is a Micrometer Carriage Stop (Logan made them as an accessory, that one looks a bit different than the one I have). The thing on the right is a "Trav-A-Dial". It's more of less a mechanical DRO.
 

Holescreek

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Nov 10, 2013
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Yep, Trav-a-Dial on the right. If you ever try one you won't be able to live without it. I moved that one from the Logan to my Traytop. The micrometer stop is home made.

Carriagestop5.jpg

Carriagestop.jpg

Carriagestop2.jpg

Carriagestop4.jpg
 

expressline99

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Nov 29, 2015
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I thought I'd drop in and post a picture(s) of my Logan 200. I just finished painting it in the nick of time as the cold moved in on me. However, I didn't get to paint the stand or the tray yet. I bought this back in August of 2014. (I think from a guy near Truckee? He might be on here? It snowed on us that day.) and I am just now to the point of being able to use it.

Hopefully this edit is not picture overkill. But I've added all the painted pictures and the original condition pictures. Sorry the unpainted pictures are so dark. I think I was a bit too excited about my purchase.

Reno Paul (Added: 12/8/16 I was looking at all the pictures on this thread....ran into mine...I was thinking wow that looks familiar! Opps.)

painted Logan 200.jpg PC110009.JPG PC110010.JPG PC110011.JPG PC110012.JPG PC110013.JPG PC110014.JPG PC110016.JPG Wide topside.JPG Drive belt.JPG gear setup.JPG Headstock end.JPG PICT0274.JPG Rear of lathe.JPG the milling attachment side view.JPG the tooling.JPG PC110003.JPG PC110004.JPG PC110005.JPG PC110006.JPG PC110007.JPG PC110008.JPG
 
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Richard White (richardsrelics)

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My avatar shows what I started with, and this is an in process shot. Working on a taper attachment right now while I am waiting for my chip pan to be blasted clean... This is an 820 with the turret tail stock..
1947 Logan Lathe upon arrival.jpg

First trial reassembly.jpg

And here it is completed, a few bushings to make and finish the hand wheels, and ready for another 60 + years of service.

Complete.jpg
 
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