[4]

Unheated shop rust prevention

[3]
[10] Like what you see?
Click here to donate to this forum and upgrade your account!

skrewd

Registered
Registered
Joined
Dec 8, 2016
Messages
42
Likes
19
#1
Hello any miracle products or than grease to prevent sweat rust on machines in unheated shops? Never ending battle I am losing.
 
F

f350ca

Guest - Please Register!
Guest - Please Register!
#2
Fluid Film https://nlsproducts.ca/shop/products/fluid-film seams to work well. The last time I moved I sprayed all my machines with WD40 thinking it was short term storage in a 20 foot sea container. Within a week or two I started seeing rust. Bought a gallon of this and brushed it on everything. The tools were in storage for a little over a year. Wiped them down with solvent and found no rust at all. Sold me. Has a funny smell, probably the lanolin in it, sure softens your hands.

Greg
 

middle.road

Actively Learning...
H-M Supporter - Gold Member ($25)
Joined
Apr 28, 2014
Messages
1,347
Likes
725
#3
Been fighting for over 5 years now in East TN, and keep losing the battle.
I put furniture paste wax on the Table Saws and Drill Press tables and cheap vises and it working pretty well,
metal working tooling not so much.
WDNich gave me a sample of this (Ballistol) that I've use on 1-2-3 Blocks, Angles, Lathe Chucks, Albrecht Chucks, fine hand tools, ETC. and it is working very well.
-=- LINK -=-
 

Dredb

Registered
Registered
Joined
Jan 6, 2018
Messages
94
Likes
90
#4
Insulate your shop, seal gaps around doors and windows then use a dehumidifier. If this is not possible then f350ca has the other answer.
 

skrewd

Registered
Registered
Joined
Dec 8, 2016
Messages
42
Likes
19
#5
Thanks on order, will give it a try.

Can’t seal the barn at this time and the two car garage is my woodworking area even its bonus room has over ten grand in cherry, “I will use eventually “.lol
 

Dredb

Registered
Registered
Joined
Jan 6, 2018
Messages
94
Likes
90
#6
middle.road, not sure what you mean by furniture paste wax but I have had good results with beeswax furniture polish. Excellent for cast iron and steel. Gives a protective coat (more than one coat may be applied) and makes handles and wheels much more pleasant to touch.
Dredb
 

skrewd

Registered
Registered
Joined
Dec 8, 2016
Messages
42
Likes
19
#7
I haven’t had success with bees wax, in my case the bees come back to reclaim it, I don’t argue with them.
 

Dredb

Registered
Registered
Joined
Jan 6, 2018
Messages
94
Likes
90
#8
Can’t seal the barn at this time and the two car garage is my woodworking area even its bonus room has over ten grand in cherry said:
One of the guys over here built a shed inside his barn. This was a stone barn in the north of England (damp), it was grade 3 listed (heritage site) so he wasn't allowed to make alterations to the building. Just an idea, worked for him!
 

Dredb

Registered
Registered
Joined
Jan 6, 2018
Messages
94
Likes
90
#9
I haven’t had success with bees wax, in my case the bees come back to reclaim it, I don’t argue with them.
:) Yes, there may be a difference in the formulation of wax polishes, paste furniture and car waxes over here contain a high proportion of water, which is not what's needed. The stuff I'm talking about is mostly beeswax with the addition of camphor and not much else, it is not cheap and is intended for antique furniture, really is very good on metal. We usually swap the wax for some sugar so the bees are happy too!
Dredb
 

C-Bag

Ned Ludd's bro
H-M Supporter - Gold Member ($25)
Joined
Feb 9, 2017
Messages
478
Likes
327
#10
I live on the coast and my shop is un heated and uninsulated. I was talking to a guy who rebuilt machine tools for a living for most of his life. He was the one who told me about Fluid Film. Goofy name, goofy dated looking can, not cheap, but totally amazing stuff! Best of all it's completely non toxic and seems to last forever. And it's available at auto parts stores. It has completely stopped all the rust on all my machines and one can goes a long way. I told my neighbor who has a fishing boat that fishes off the coast here and it's stopped all his rust.
 

kvt

Active User
H-M Supporter - Gold Member ($25)
Joined
Oct 21, 2014
Messages
2,008
Likes
997
#11
CRC makes a spray on protective coating (SP-400) that I have been using on stuff as a clean it up and it seems to be working good. I'm cleaning stuff then spray it down. move on. So far it has worked. then just wipe it down when I start working and lightly spray down again afterwards.
 

7milesup

H-M Supporter - Gold Member
H-M Supporter - Gold Member ($25)
Joined
Jan 7, 2016
Messages
237
Likes
258
#12

Joncooey

Active Member
Registered
Joined
Sep 27, 2016
Messages
86
Likes
109
#13
Atlasfrost.jpg
I feel your pain SKREWD. Even with the machines covered this is what I had last time it hit -27C (-20F) here on the North shore of Lake Ontario. I can have the wood-stove going all day and it won't help much with these temps; shop's a bit breezy. Definitely going to try that Fluid Film idea, F350ca; I've seen it in stores, thanks for the info. Wouldn't want to put your tongue on that Anvil, eh?
 

Attachments

Bob Korves

H-M Supporter - Sustaining Member
H-M Platinum Supporter ($50)
Joined
Jul 2, 2014
Messages
5,655
Likes
5,966
#14
The only real answer is to always have the shop temperature above the dew point. Here that happens pretty much naturally. In northern and humid climates, you will need to heat above the dew point, or lower the dew point by removing the moisture, or do both. Rust inhibitors can only do so much for so long, water and rust always win.
 
F

f350ca

Guest - Please Register!
Guest - Please Register!
#15
All that frost makes me shiver. I luckily heat the shop and house with a wood fired boiler so I don't have those issues in the winter. Summer is another story, the machine shop stays at about 17 C all summer. If I open the big doors on hot humid days the tools are all covered in literately a 1/4 inch of water. Wipe and oil time.

Greg
 

skrewd

Registered
Registered
Joined
Dec 8, 2016
Messages
42
Likes
19
#16
okay orderd Boeshield can which I have used before on my Barrett but I need the spray can version this time.

I wasn’t thinking out side the box, I cover everything in plastic. Was going to double cover with a tarp but an building inside a building, why didn’t I consider that. Far easier, quick and when I make another “man cavern”, I can make it a tack room.
 

skrewd

Registered
Registered
Joined
Dec 8, 2016
Messages
42
Likes
19
#17
Did Amazon today and The Home Depot tomorrow, thanks great suggestions, I am using them all, sprays ,two walls and a door, insulation, tyvex roll, space heater. This will work, thanks again.
 

ConValSam

----
H-M Supporter - Gold Member ($25)
Joined
Nov 10, 2017
Messages
50
Likes
21
#18

EmilioG

Active User
H-M Supporter - Gold Member ($25)
Joined
Jul 20, 2014
Messages
1,328
Likes
572
#19
Dow Corning Molykote Rust Prevention Film is the longest lasting product I've used to date. Fluid Film needs to be reapplied every year or so, depending on use. ( I use it on the underside of my cars, NY winters and all). It smells terrible for a few weeks. A dehumidifier will also go a long way at keeping rust at bay. Small hand tools? I keep them wrapped in Zero Rust CorTec Vci paper. Works great. Machines; A bit more difficult, where you can't really get to all parts of the machine. Without a temp/Humidity controlled room, the rust battle gets very difficult. Meticulous maintenance and cleaning/oiling may be your only bet. There's a great book called "
Rust: The Longest War
by Jonathan Waldman (Author)
 
Last edited:

Bob Korves

H-M Supporter - Sustaining Member
H-M Platinum Supporter ($50)
Joined
Jul 2, 2014
Messages
5,655
Likes
5,966
#20
I bought some Armor type MPI VPI paper on eBay and put it in with many of my tools. It works. Make sure the grade of VPI you get is appropriate for the material and conditions you are working with. The Armor VCI paper is also coated on both sides.
http://armorvci.net/wrap35.htm
https://www.armorvci.com/wp-content/uploads/ARMOR-WRAP-MPI-60-Product-Data-Sheet.pdf
The 30G that is currently being sold on eBay is also good for ferrous metals:
https://www.ebay.com/itm/25-BIG-she...139963?hash=item4b2be7837b:g:kSEAAOSwaLhZe5yL
https://www.armorvci.com/wp-content/uploads/ARMOR-WRAP-30G-Product-Data-Sheet.pdf
Store the VPI in an air tight container so it is still good when you need it.
 

brasssmanget

Active User
H-M Supporter - Gold Member ($25)
Joined
Feb 7, 2012
Messages
482
Likes
81
#21
For what it's worth, Fluidfilm spray has worked very well for me here in WI - it does get below 15 degrees in my shop quite often during the winter months.....sometimes below (-) 0 for a few days at a time....
 

C-Bag

Ned Ludd's bro
H-M Supporter - Gold Member ($25)
Joined
Feb 9, 2017
Messages
478
Likes
327
#22
As a small manufacturer I have parts laser cut and then have to store them until I powdercoat them. So I can't just squirt stuff down because it's too hard to clean for powdercoating. I thought about the paper wrapping and while looking into it found this https://www.theruststore.com/Bull-Frog-Rust-Blocker-Strips-P23C22.aspx

These are used by local fisherman to keep their tackle from rusting from the salt water. So I bought a couple of packs and also found a good sized plastic storage box with a nice seal at Target. The Bullfrog strips are like foam with a sticky back so you can stick them on the lid of a tackle box. You don't want to have your pieces you are trying to keep from corroding resting on the strips, so I stick them high inside the box where pieces don't rest on them. This has totally stopped my rust problem which has sped things up for me because before this I spent more time cleaning up the pieces than powdercoating! I have left some stuff for months in the box and they look like I just put them in there. And best of all it leaves nothing on the pieces that imped the powdercoat from sticking.
 

skrewd

Registered
Registered
Joined
Dec 8, 2016
Messages
42
Likes
19
#23
The rust store, that site should just about cover it.

Now if the mail would finally deliver in this five inch snow, my old firebird had no trouble in this but her “new jeep does “, I should loan her my cj7,lol
 

rwm

Active User
H-M Supporter - Gold Member ($25)
Joined
Mar 25, 2013
Messages
1,433
Likes
1,635
#24
Fluid film works great and last a long time. Unfortunately your tools smell like wet sheep...
Robert
 

skrewd

Registered
Registered
Joined
Dec 8, 2016
Messages
42
Likes
19
#25
Is that like wet dog? Is it musty like mildew? Rust is my enemy, I could make a few passes with sulfur cutting oil on the lathe to perfume up the shop.
 

juiceclone

Active Member
Registered
Joined
Oct 24, 2014
Messages
201
Likes
117
#26
dehumidifier .. more than one if the shop is large enough. I have mine on a timer to run at night into morning. They actually add a little heat to the air too. If U get the moisture in the air down low enough, the rust problem will disappear. Unless u leave doors open, then ...oh well.... smelling like wet dog is in your future.... :>)
 

KBeitz

H-M Supporter - Gold Member
H-M Supporter - Gold Member ($25)
Joined
Apr 17, 2018
Messages
383
Likes
192
#27
I use a product called Slip-it. It works great on my cast iron table saw. It's kinda like a wax...
You put it on with a brush and it drys. You can;t see or feel if when you finished. No more rust problem.
 

AJ

H-M Supporter - Gold Member
H-M Supporter - Gold Member ($25)
Joined
Sep 1, 2018
Messages
49
Likes
24
#28
Mobil Vactra 2 and thin plastic layed on the bed and ways..Kept things rust free all winter and this incredibly humid summer !
 

pineyfolks

Active User
Registered
Joined
Apr 30, 2012
Messages
1,078
Likes
418
#29
I've used most of the spray lubricants and rust preventive coatings but the best thing I did was install 2 large ceiling fans that run continuously in my shop. Keeping the air moving makes it harder to condense on my equipment during large temperature changes.
 

drivermark

H-M Supporter - Silver Member
H-M Supporter - Silver Member ($10)
Joined
Jan 22, 2017
Messages
4
Likes
10
#30
I've had pretty good luck using chainsaw bar oil, I spread it on pretty thick with a cheapo chip brush after wiping every thing down with a WD40 soaked rag to displace any moisture. I'm sure there are better ways but this works for me. I'm located in NW Oregon so it does get a bit damp here.
 
[6]
[5] [7]
Top