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Richard King

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#31
Well I am just starting out so a glendo is way over my budget. So it has a carbide tip, I will buy a few more tips so I can spend more time scraping than sharpening. So 60mm is about a 2.5" in American?
I think its 2.36" but have to get one of the math majors figure it out exactly....but its about 6" diameter circle or 3" r is good for a beginner. Look at the thread history and Bill, Tad and Mel show you how to make a super cheap diamond lapping machine.

The reason you grind a rounder blade is so you don't get a flat blades corner scratch. A small eye to hand coordination error and you twist the scraper handle and instead of scraping in the center of the blade you catch the corner of the blade and you get a gouge or as some guys say it's an shallow oil groove :rofl: or an extra deep oil pocket. When you buy a Anderson scraper the blade is flat and a great extra deep oil pocket maker :rofl:. Take a look at the last post and as I said grind the blade that round. The one (Biax model # 20-150 or 3/4" wide x 6" long) on the left is about a 60 R and the one on the right ( 25-150 or 1 1/4" x 6") is a 40 r. Rich

PS: Also note the black mark in the center so you can aim the center of the blade when your scraping, in the classes I call it your sight as in a gun, so you can scoot your bolt action gun when hand scraping. We also mark the BIAX Power scraper blade when your machine gunning the high spots off.
 
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#32
60mm equals 2.3594 inches. 60 X .039370

"Billy G"
 
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#34
Doing the math on my calculator actually comes closer to the answer Rich gave or 2.3622. The answer I gave first came from one of those on line converters. :lmao: Sorry for any confusion.

"Billy G"
 

Richard King

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#35
I cheated and found a metric / inch conversion chart on Google for the radius....LOL. As my trip to Taiwan draws nearer to attend my 30th year class reunion with all my students I have taught over the years I clicked on my pictures. If you see I have students from not only Taiwan, but there are pictures of my GA class we had last spring. Tommy Brooks is the handsome devil with the mustache, Jim Johnson or Gearco is the standing next to him. The group of guys are from Bushe Precision in Milwaukee. I can remember so many people who stood out. But these hobbyist classes seem to be more rewarding as of late. Thank You to my friends who I have helped.

As I come nearer to my retirement I have so many fond memories of these classes. It was a real adventure, heck must have been in 1980 or so when I taught my first class at GM / Detroit Diesel Allison in Indianapolis when I was 30 years old and teaching Journeymen Machine Rebuilders in their 60's. One memory that stands out is when I taught a class at Galmeyer and Livingston in Grand Rapid, MI where they built surface grinders. The Grandson of the original owner, Charlie Galmeyer had me come in with the cooperation with DAPRA who sells the Power Scrapers..and teach 3 apprentices and 3 of their oldest Journeymen how to use the BIAX Scraper. The first day the old farts were in there little world of "Those BIAX scrapers are for roughing" attitude and the young guys were scraping 20 points.

That was 8 more points then the old farts (my age now) lol...had been hand scraping for years...yes 12 points. I say you can get 20 points by accident using the checkerboard techinique I was taught and now teach. On day 2 Charlie came out and looked things over and said the the lead Journeyman, whats happening ? It was obvious the young guy who didn't have the attitude and an open mind were making monkeys out of the obstinate older guys who didn't want to at least give it a chance. After lunch that day, those 3 older guys came over and said "Rich show us again"....that broke the ice....as I had pretty much stopped teaching them as they had a smart remark every time I tried to show them something so I ignored them prior to that.

It is hard to teach an old dog new tricks, but it can be done. After we finished the practice bars we broke up into 2 man teams and they scraped the machine with my tricks of the trade tips. I also learned from them. I have been always open to new ideas over the years and find new and faster methods so our company could make more money. Thats why My dad bought the first BIAX, why I now use Turcite / Rulon / Moglice. The last day at G&L as I was loading up my tools I heard a Yell "Rich" and I turned around and there stood the old lead Journeyman with his Anderson hand scraper...he was standing next to the trash barrel and he tossed his hand scraper in it. Rich
Link to the pic's. http://www.hobby-machinist.com/album.php?albumid=216
 

astjp2

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#36
Having an open mind is very important when learning something new. Eliminating bias and having critical thinking when it comes to understanding what is required when partaking in a new craft is essential to learn from what others have experienced. If you can learn from someone else's mistakes, the learning curve is greatly reduced. Tim
 

Tony Wells

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#37
You maybe right for most cases, but not always Tony, I bought a CMM that had a inspection certificate as lapped AAA grade. I bought it 10 yrs or so at a 3M silent auction they have up here ever few months. It also came with a self leveling 3 point stand. The wires looked like a cob web so no one wanted it if the controls were shot. I bought it for the minimum bid of $75.00. Cost me more to have it moved then I paid for it. I know a couple of guys who have made surface plates from them too. If I saw another one at an auction and I needed a plate I would buy it if the price was right. It had the inserts and they were real handy checking some parts.

Which is why I phrased my reply as I did. And I would go so far as to say that a granite plate taken from a CMM would make an excellent surface plate. They are usually thicker than found on an equivalent plane size plates, and hence more stable. Plus you are more likely to get a pink plate with a quality CMM than a lesser black granite.

And I do like the fact that there usually are hold down threaded inserts in the CMM plates. Just don't over tighten the clamps, they can pull a chunk of granite out.
 

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#38
Ok, I have been working on making the way alignment took, one of the items I am trying to build uses a ground and hardened pin that I can use to check the inside of the dovetail. I tried to drill it with a cobalt #30 drill and it just bounced off of it. What should I do to drill a hole in this pin? I am going to tap the side with a 1/4x20 so I can put a riser on it and slide it along the inside of the dovetail to check the parallelism. Any ideas out there on the best way to drill and tap a hardened dowel pin? Tim
 

Richard King

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#39
Aneal it. I use to use ball bearings for the round end of the bar. A easy way is to make a charcoal fire in your BBQ and lay the ball or rod in it and let it heat up and let it gradually cool off. That should do the trick or use a torch...
 

Erik Brewster

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#41
The big trick to sharpening carbide is to use a diamond wheel. I suspect the knife grinder will spin fast (1800 / 3600 rpm). The 8" grinder is slower and could be made to work, if you can get a diamond wheel on it.

The slow speed isn't strictly needed for diamond on carbide, but things will be cool and easy to control if the speed is low.

The 8" grinder looks like it might be tough to hold the scraper at the right angle with that guide, but it might work. A good guide doesn't need to be expensive, some scrap wood and time can do the job.

Erik
 

astjp2

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#42
So if I do the Ebay option for a diamond lap and get a grinder from grizzly to put it on, what RPM should I be lookin for in a grinder similar to those posted above? Tim
 

Richard King

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#43
Did you see this post bill added a super cheap way to sharpen the blades. My Glendo runs about 300 RPM.

http://www.hobby-machinist.com/showthread.php/14987-My-cheapo-Glendo-substitute?p=115819#post115819


The advantage of the Glendo is your blade doesn't get hot like the 3450 RPM machines get. If you can make one of those Grizzly grinders to accept a face wheel and if you can make a tilt table that is adjustable. It should work. If you have a lathe, you could make a adjustable blade rest that would set on the compound.
 

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#44
I saw that posting, I need to have a sharpener at home and my lathe is at my shop. That is why I am trying to make something work. Tim
 

Richard King

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#45
For years in my Dad's shop we used a regular double end grinder with a 6 x 3/4 x 1 1/4 flat faced 300 grit diamond wheel mounted on one side. We welded an extension on the tool rest that was on the side. The blade would get hot, so we had to be careful and free handed the angle. If you have a double end grinder I see a wheel on Ebay like it is selling for $100.00. Mell and Tadd have home built grinders in the archives too.
 

astjp2

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#46
For years in my Dad's shop we used a regular double end grinder with a 6 x 3/4 x 1 1/4 flat faced 300 grit diamond wheel mounted on one side. We welded an extension on the tool rest that was on the side. The blade would get hot, so we had to be careful and free handed the angle. If you have a double end grinder I see a wheel on Ebay like it is selling for $100.00. Mell and Tadd have home built grinders in the archives too.
I finally received the new carbide tip, radius gauge and scraper handle from Anderson, I like the fit of the new handle better than the original. I spent some time radiusing the new tip, now I just need to get it lapped for a nice sharp finish. It is not easy to make a good round contour but I have it pretty close and hope that lapping will finish truing it up. Tim
 

Richard King

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#47
My friend Peter tried to hand lap the blades and raved about how great it worked until he sharped his blade on my glendo.....ha ha..
 

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#48
I cheated and found a metric / inch conversion chart on Google for the radius....LOL. As my trip to Taiwan draws nearer to attend my 30th year class reunion with all my students I have taught over the years I clicked on my pictures. If you see I have students from not only Taiwan, but there are pictures of my GA class we had last spring. Tommy Brooks is the handsome devil with the mustache, Jim Johnson or Gearco is the standing next to him. The group of guys are from Bushe Precision in Milwaukee. I can remember so many people who stood out. But these hobbyist classes seem to be more rewarding as of late. Thank You to my friends who I have helped.

As I come nearer to my retirement I have so many fond memories of these classes. It was a real adventure, heck must have been in 1980 or so when I taught my first class at GM / Detroit Diesel Allison in Indianapolis when I was 30 years old and teaching Journeymen Machine Rebuilders in their 60's. One memory that stands out is when I taught a class at Galmeyer and Livingston in Grand Rapid, MI where they built surface grinders. The Grandson of the original owner, Charlie Galmeyer had me come in with the cooperation with DAPRA who sells the Power Scrapers..and teach 3 apprentices and 3 of their oldest Journeymen how to use the BIAX Scraper. The first day the old farts were in there little world of "Those BIAX scrapers are for roughing" attitude and the young guys were scraping 20 points.

That was 8 more points then the old farts (my age now) lol...had been hand scraping for years...yes 12 points. I say you can get 20 points by accident using the checkerboard techinique I was taught and now teach. On day 2 Charlie came out and looked things over and said the the lead Journeyman, whats happening ? It was obvious the young guy who didn't have the attitude and an open mind were making monkeys out of the obstinate older guys who didn't want to at least give it a chance. After lunch that day, those 3 older guys came over and said "Rich show us again"....that broke the ice....as I had pretty much stopped teaching them as they had a smart remark every time I tried to show them something so I ignored them prior to that.

It is hard to teach an old dog new tricks, but it can be done. After we finished the practice bars we broke up into 2 man teams and they scraped the machine with my tricks of the trade tips. I also learned from them. I have been always open to new ideas over the years and find new and faster methods so our company could make more money. Thats why My dad bought the first BIAX, why I now use Turcite / Rulon / Moglice. The last day at G&L as I was loading up my tools I heard a Yell "Rich" and I turned around and there stood the old lead Journeyman with his Anderson hand scraper...he was standing next to the trash barrel and he tossed his hand scraper in it. Rich
Link to the pic's. http://www.hobby-machinist.com/album.php?albumid=216
Rich,

love that story..... I can see him and the trash can.

my only question is why would you retire ?

if you ever want a vacation to fl. Your always welcome.

all the best john.





.
 

astjp2

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#49
Scraping QCTP

SO if I get a decent quality QCTP, should I look at scraping the base and the compound rest? If so, how many PPI would I need? Also what is the difference between a BXA type 1 tool holder and a BXA type 2? Tim
 

Erik Brewster

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Re: Scraping QCTP

SO if I get a decent quality QCTP, should I look at scraping the base and the compound rest? If so, how many PPI would I need?
I think you should. Scraping will guarantee you have flat surfaces, and that will eliminate rocking due to bad surfaces. I would say 10 ppi would be plenty. You will want to make sure you get some significant (50%) spotting coverage. You can get that fairly easily by wet stoning after you scrape it flat.

I think the type 2 holder has a v groove to hold a round bit. The v is not so wide that you can't use flat tools, but it can be inconvenient when mounting small tools -- they may not be as wide as the v.
 

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#51
Re: Scraping QCTP

Erik, thank you for the information. Tim

I think you should. Scraping will guarantee you have flat surfaces, and that will eliminate rocking due to bad surfaces. I would say 10 ppi would be plenty. You will want to make sure you get some significant (50%) spotting coverage. You can get that fairly easily by wet stoning after you scrape it flat.

I think the type 2 holder has a v groove to hold a round bit. The v is not so wide that you can't use flat tools, but it can be inconvenient when mounting small tools -- they may not be as wide as the v.
 

astjp2

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#52
So I have been making progress, I am almost finished with a 600 rpm diamond lap. I need to rebuild the table because I broke a tap and I need to wire it up. Slowly but surely I will get there. Oh yeah, I had to make a bushing to fit the Crysalis 1200 grit lap onto the metric motor shaft. The outside of the lap has a .008 tir for out of round, what do you guys think I should do to get it to run true? Add some set screws? Tap it with a mallet? Any ideas would be appreciated. Tim
diamond lap.jpg Diamond 2.jpg Diamond 3.jpg

diamond lap.jpg Diamond 2.jpg Diamond 3.jpg
 

Erik Brewster

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#53
I had to make a bushing to fit the Crysalis 1200 grit lap onto the metric motor shaft. The outside of the lap has a .008 tir for out of round, what do you guys think I should do to get it to run true? Add some set screws? Tap it with a mallet? Any ideas would be appreciated. Tim
Scrape it. I'm guessing your bushing is an inch across and your lapping wheel is 8" across. You only need to take 0.001" of the correct part of the bushing. Figure out where the material needs to come off, measure it, scrape it, measure it, repeat until it is correct. Kind of a pain, but it's a small part.

You could sand it with sandpaper on a flat surface, if you put pressure in the correct spot, too.

You could also Dremel it with a sanding drum. These three solutions are all really the same thing; just different ways of removing the material.
 

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#54
The lap is only 5" and the hole the bushing is in in the lap is 5/8" mounted on a 12mm D shaped shaft. I did get the busted tap out, had to use a carbide 3/16 endmill and a broken tap extractor. The endmill wound up turning in the tap piece and bottoming it out so I was able to use broken tap extractor to get back last chunk out. tim
 

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#55
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#56
I've made a few changes and added some lightening hole. I also went with countersunk screws, it turned out nice. Tim base.jpg

base.jpg
 

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#57
Well I now have a surface plate and I added 3 more 4' florescent lights lights in my shop. The surface plate is 3'x4'x8". After Bebop verifies level and surface flatness, I will be able to start scraping. Tim downsized_1224131830.jpg

downsized_1224131830.jpg
 

astjp2

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#58
I made some progress on the lathe today, I am ordering the parts I need, gears and screws as I find them. How does this look for the scraping for the cross slide? 4th pass scraping 4th pass.jpg cross slide.jpg

scraping 4th pass.jpg cross slide.jpg
 
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#59
Looking great!

Come scrape mine when you are finished:))
 

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#60
I have spent 3 days working on getting the gas furnace running in the shop, none of the safeties seemed to work so I am trying to locate parts for a Janitrol unit heater, dated 1956. The snap switch that turns on he fan was bad so I installed a 24 v coil relay to turn on the fan motor, there was no transformer so I had to buy one of those to get the low voltage for the thermostat and gas valve. I tried to get a 6 second timer to replace the snap switch but the one I got did not work. Now the motor for the fan is not working, I need to remove it and take it to the electrical shop to get repaired. Its a t42 frame 1/3 hp, not a common size, the t48 is more common. Hopefully I will have heat soon.

I also started my project to insulate my door, its a 10x18' sliding barn style door. That thing acts like a huge radiator and sucks out the heat that I did have in the shop. All in due time. Tim
 
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