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Clausing/Colchester 11" (Colchester Bantam 2000)

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sakurama

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Yes, they're overfilled. You all guilted me into opening up the top and draining out the excess. I usually run them slightly over the mark due to slower reaction times (oh, crap, I guess that's too much) and a general apathy towards gearbox levels. The lower box was overfilled to the top of the window which worked out to 4oz. and the top one was the same level over but the gearbox is larger and that worked out to about 12oz over. I did find that the two main bearings are lubricated by oil being flung off the gears to the top where the oil drips into two holes which weep onto the gears - very precise. One was slightly blocked with swarf so that was good to find and clean out but otherwise the gearbox looked perfect. I could be wrong but I doubt there's too much issue with the gearbox being slightly overfilled. It's not exactly spinning at the speed of a motorcycle transmission and they last for years.

The upside is that I needed to top up the oil on the cold saw and now I have some extra.

Gregor
 

Clem

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I don't know if this is the right place to say this but I made a travelling steady for my Colchester Bantam (I think it is the same lathe as this one). I got a 1" bit of steel laser cut and then machined it from there. If anybody's interested, I can try to dig out some (not very good) drawings that I did and post them here. I ended up changing some of the dimensions a little bit as I made a few careless mistakes in the machining but the drawings would at least be a starting point; and the mistakes didn't affect the function of the steady. I did all the milling on a Boxford VM30, apart from one bit that I had to do on a friend's Bridgeport. Anybody interested? I'll also try to take a picture of the finished item (although I have painted it poorly).
 

dogbed

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Clem,

I'd love to see them, especially with some pics! I am missing the rest and I think that would be a great project.
 
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brightonmike

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I would also be interested in seeing your plans.
 

wa5cab

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The common name for the rest that is attached to and moves with the carriage is Follow Rest or Follower Rest.
 

sakurama

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I have a question regarding my (our) lathe. I'm about to turn the most difficult part I've ever turned - a steering stem for a motorcycle fork conversion. I will have to turn dimensions for a shrink fit, a press fit, a slip fit and then a loose fit plus a pair of metric threads of 30x1mm and 28x1mm so it will certainly test my skill.

My question is about runout. I turned the aluminum stock down to 1.125 to fit in the largest 5C collet and drilled the other end for a live center. I turned the whole thing to a dimension with a .010 finish pass over the length. Over the 11" the dimension is .008" tighter at the head stock. That works out to an error of .00072 an inch.

Obviously the sections that require a very tight tolerance are less than an inch so this shouldn't be an issue and I'm sure more precise parts have been made with worse machines but I'm curious if this is a reasonable error and/or what could be done to improve it or if I should just know and accept it and work around it.

Thanks,

Gregor
 

dogbed

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Gregor,

I would check your tail stock alignment. It is probably adjusted a bit off toward the chip pan. You should be able to adjust it by doing that same cut you are doing or use a test bar between centers.

Colin
 

Clem

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Here they are. I hope they're of interest. The pictures aren't very good, I'm afraid.photo 1.JPG photo 1.JPG photo 2.JPG photo 5.JPG photo 6.JPG Please let me know if you have any questions.
 

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Clem

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I have a question regarding my (our) lathe. I'm about to turn the most difficult part I've ever turned - a steering stem for a motorcycle fork conversion. I will have to turn dimensions for a shrink fit, a press fit, a slip fit and then a loose fit plus a pair of metric threads of 30x1mm and 28x1mm so it will certainly test my skill.

My question is about runout. I turned the aluminum stock down to 1.125 to fit in the largest 5C collet and drilled the other end for a live center. I turned the whole thing to a dimension with a .010 finish pass over the length. Over the 11" the dimension is .008" tighter at the head stock. That works out to an error of .00072 an inch.

Obviously the sections that require a very tight tolerance are less than an inch so this shouldn't be an issue and I'm sure more precise parts have been made with worse machines but I'm curious if this is a reasonable error and/or what could be done to improve it or if I should just know and accept it and work around it.

Thanks,

Gregor
Hello Gregor,

I'm no expert but I reckon you can get a better runout than that. I've found that, in this situation, I usually drill the end for the centre after I've put the piece in the 5C collet. I also, quite often, end up adjusting the tailstock a little bit, using a clock, once the piece is in the collet with the centre in the end and the tailstock clamped, to make sure that everything is as well lined up as it can be. It might actually prove easier to turn between centres, if you want good accuracy. It's taken me a while to get used to doing things like this but, now that I've done it a few times, I get on OK with it.

I don't know if this is any help. I'm really a beginner myself.
 

Badge171

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Clem
Cheeseking put some detailed plans up for me on the follow rest , There posted in another thread in this column. and some pictures of the one I made. His plans include pictures of the original equipment . Hope it helps
Frank
 

Cheeseking

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Gregor, it sounds like your tailstock could be slightly offset.
After I shot this video I re-checked sweeping the inside of the MT on the barrel vs the OD. This is my rough hary eyeball method of checking.


I believe the "real" way to check is traversing with an indicator along a ground bar mounted between centers. If you are turning unwanted tapers when only holding by the chuck then I think the issue is headstock alignment to the bed. Thats a whole nuther can of worms.
ImageUploadedByTapatalk1449119398.189904.jpg
 
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wa5cab

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Turning a taper with the work piece held between centers or with chuck or collet and tailstock center is usually an indication of tailstock back set error. Turning a taper with work piece held in chuck or collet may be an indication of a twisted bed or a worn bed.
 

Badge171

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Isn't it possible with that machine that the headstock is out of alignment, It is adjustable . Rather than the bed being twisted ,or worn. Just a thought.
 

wa5cab

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Yes. However, unless it has had a bad crash or been dropped on the headstock, I would guess it is the least likely as headstocks are generally a tight fit between the ways and if there is an alignment problem, it would have almost had to have been that way since new.
 

sakurama

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Yes, it was the tailstock that was out of alignment. I managed to adjust it so that the error over 11" is just under .001" which I don't know if I want to try to spend the time to try to improve. I don't know if I was doing it wrong to start but I was turning in the screw on the back side of the tailstock (loosening the one on the front) and the taper got worse so I went backwards to what I thought was the right way to adjust it and screwed in the adjustment screw on the front side and the taper went away and I got it to be basically on. Perhaps you guys are more patient than I am or more particular but I can't see trying to improve on .001" over 11".

Thanks for the advice - it's good know I could turn an axle now if need be.

Gregor

Gregor,

I would check your tail stock alignment. It is probably adjusted a bit off toward the chip pan. You should be able to adjust it by doing that same cut you are doing or use a test bar between centers.

Colin
 

wa5cab

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Gregor,

0.001" per foot is pretty good. If it is good enough for the parts that you want to make with it, I wouldn't fiddle with it any more.

I took "tighter near the headstock" to mean larger. Which meant that the tailstock was too far forward (toward the operator). I wasn't sure what Colin meant by "off toward the chip pan". My chip pan is symmetrical. But in any case, you figured out which direction to move the tailstock.
 

Kiwi

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The common name for the rest that is attached to and moves with the carriage is Follow Rest or Follower Rest.
I've always known them as a fixed or floating steady either way you would know
 

Clem

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I've always known them as a fixed or floating steady either way you would know
I've always known them as a fixed steady and a travelling steady! As long as they do the job!
 

badboydas

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Hi Guys
Sorry to jump in here, just bought one these beauties in a sorry state. Being delivered tomorrow, Don`t suppose anyone has a manual in PDF they would be willing to mail me or post a link to. attached a picture of it in its present location, as you can see it needs a lot of attention.
cheers
Sorry just found the manual in the downloads section cheers
WP_20160211_14_46_28_Pro.jpg
 
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sakurama

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Gregor,

0.001" per foot is pretty good. If it is good enough for the parts that you want to make with it, I wouldn't fiddle with it any more...
I did fiddle with it some more and got it down under .0001 over 11" so I'm more than satisfied as this is the limit of my ability to measure with the micrometers I have. Took a while but I'm very happy to have it so dialed in right now. I just finished a steering stem and it was nice to be able to hit the numbers exactly wherever I needed.

As for the manual: I ended up buying a printed one (which is nothing more than a copy machine copy of an original... or another copy - it's bad) off of ebay. I'd love to have a nice PDF copy as I keep all my manuals on my iPad as it's easier to keep clean than a paper manual. Sadly, our machines predate computers so unless someone types in a copy or remakes one using OCR and nice scans of the images it's unlikely to find anything other than the copy of a copy of a copy...

Gregor
 

Cheeseking

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Did you get the compound slide with it? Hope so or that would be a real shame.
Look forward to some photos after you get it cleaned up a bit.
 

badboydas

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Did you get the compound slide with it? Hope so or that would be a real shame.
Look forward to some photos after you get it cleaned up a bit.
Yes got compound missing original Dickson toolpost but got holders albeit useless. few nuts and bolts missing along with all the back plates for three chucks, got catch plate and faceplate. It`s been sat in a garage for 10 years as a very poor bench he had originally started to strip it down got bored and left it till he passed late part of last year. but unfortunately the son thought scrap would be better than nothing so back plates gone. not too much of a worry though, originals would have been nice. I will post as things progress should I start a new thread or would it be ok to continue this one?
 

badboydas

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Gregor, I know what you mean we all strife for perfection or as close as we can get
 

Flightmap

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Clausing USA has operating and parts manuals available in .pdf format. They were very prompt in sending me a copy
Ken
 
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Clem

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Hi Guys
Sorry to jump in here, just bought one these beauties in a sorry state. Being delivered tomorrow, Don`t suppose anyone has a manual in PDF they would be willing to mail me or post a link to. attached a picture of it in its present location, as you can see it needs a lot of attention.
cheers
Sorry just found the manual in the downloads section cheers
View attachment 122410
I've got one I can send you, if you let me know your e-mail address. Failing that, if you ring Colchester (01924 415000, I think; it's on their website) and ask for the parts department, they should e-mail you one. They e-mailed me one and it didn't cost anything. They were very helpful. It will help if you give them the serial number of your lathe, which is on the tailstock end of one of the slideways. You can also get some spares off them. Mill Hill Supplies in Harlow, Essex, have some bits for these lathes, as I think they originally made some of the parts, and he's a helpful man.
 

badboydas

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I've got one I can send you, if you let me know your e-mail address. Failing that, if you ring Colchester (01924 415000, I think; it's on their website) and ask for the parts department, they should e-mail you one. They e-mailed me one and it didn't cost anything. They were very helpful. It will help if you give them the serial number of your lathe, which is on the tailstock end of one of the slideways. You can also get some spares off them. Mill Hill Supplies in Harlow, Essex, have some bits for these lathes, as I think they originally made some of the parts, and he's a helpful man.
Cheers for the offer Clem
I spoke to Karen at Colchester, she was more than happy to email a manual.
excellent info
cheers
 

Cheeseking

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Clem, dogbed...or anyone else looking for a factory steady rest for the 11" colchester.
I just noticed a sorry beat up 11x33 popped up on ebay that has a steady rest and a collet closer with it. Pretty sure its a dealer maybe they would sell you just the steady?
 

Lenard

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Hello,
Just a curious question about the Colchester 11" lathe.
I have the chance to buy a used Colchester 11" for a fee of 200.00 and the machine is surface rust all over it and something is locked up on it. dirty is a good word for it but the wave is in exc. shape. Would this machine be worth the price to fix up? I really like all of the post on this machine so far.
Thanks and just wondering.
 

Cheeseking

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Well, they are great little machines and $200 is practically free but if it needs parts they are very very expensive and honestly depending on which ones it needs could be nla and you would need to find used. That could take forever to never; again, depending in what exactly it needs. "Surface rust" can be fixed with elbow grease. What exactly is locked up?
Got any photos?
 
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