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Ford 300 inline six cylinder engine

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gbritnell

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Gentlemen,

One of my last threads was on making helical gears for the above mentioned project. I have been working on it since late last summer and am getting close to finishing. I have done a complete build thread on another forum with partial builds on a couple more so the time involved in total documentation on multiple forums is very time consuming.

Here's a little background on the project. I have engines in quite a few cylinder configurations, singles, twin, 4, 5, and 8. I wanted to build a 6 cylinder engine somewhat based on my 4 cylinder OHV engine but with 6 cylinders. I started with the drawings I had made for the 4 and set about making the necessary changes. Shortly into the project I realized I didn't want another generic looking engine so having worked for Ford most of my life I decided to emulate the venerable 300 cu. in. inline six. It was at this point in the design that the only thing I gleaned from the 4 drawings were the bore and stoke, almost everything else changed.

The engine is completely scratch built, the block from aluminum, the head from iron, the crank and cam from steel, the rods from bronze and the many other parts from these metals. The bore and stroke are .75 x .875. This engine will have complete cooling through the block and head. It will be a splash oiling system and have an electronic Hall trigger ignition.

The cranks is made from 1144 stressproof steel. The configuration looks different form most cranks but this was copied from the full sized crank. If worse comes to worse in regard to balance I can always remove the extra stock from the counterweight area.

The cam is made from W-1 drill rod and left unhardened. The lifters will be hardened and polished. In trying to follow the full sized engine the distributor needed to be placed mid block so that was the need for the helical gear set. The cam blanks were milled with matching flats on the inner ends and upon assembly were pressed and Loctited in place. The cam was set into a fixture for alignment until the Loctite set although the fit of the tangs and the gear held it almost perfectly in alignment.

gbritnell

CRANK FIN 1.JPG CRANK FIN 3.JPG CRANK FIN 4.JPG IMG_0810.JPG IMG_0823.JPG IMG_0900.JPG IMG_0903.JPG IMG_0931.JPG
 

gbritnell

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Next up is the block. This was machined from 6061 aluminum. The water jacket area was cut out using a modified Woodruff key cutter to undercut the head deck area. A step off chart was made to move the cutter to several different points within the bore hole to remove the stock. This process was repeated numerous times per bore hole to step down to the proper depth. Iron sleeves were turned to 2 different diameters on the outside, smaller on the bottom to facilitate pressing in place. The inner bore was left about .0015 small so that it could be honed after pressing. On this engine I decided to use a somewhat different approach in regard to the main bearings. Rather than make caps with inserts the bearings were cut rectangular with mounting flanges from bearing bronze. The reason behind this was due to my experiences trying to line bore small diameters and the inevitable runout that occurs. This way the bearing slot could be milled square in a convention setup and the bearings milled and reamed with a fixture to insure accuracy. The front and rear mains are one piece while the inner bearings are split to fit over the journals.
gbritnell

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gbritnell

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The next major part was the cylinder head. This was made from ductile iron which can be purchased as Durabar or Schedule 40 iron. It is a very fine grained iron that machines great leaving nice sharp corners and edges. I prefer to use iron that way the valve seats and guides can be machined right into the head without the additional problems that valve pocket inserts sometimes cause. I don't cut the seats while machining preferring to use a home-made seat cutter to align with the valve guide. This way if any of the pocketing is a little off the cutter will clean up the seat true to the guide. Much as in full sized practice. In following the design of the Ford 300 head the spark plugs are located on the pushrod side of the head. This only allows so much space to get the plugs in so for this engine they will be made with 8-36 threads and .219 hexes. For the water passages holes were drilled completely though the head and then plugged at the ends. The holes from the head face were then drilled up into these passages. At the front of the head a larger opening was made to accommodate the water outlet fitting.
gbritnell

head a.jpg head b.jpg head c.jpg head d.jpg head e.jpg head f.jpg head g.jpg head h.jpg head i.jpg head j.jpg head k.jpg
 

Walltoddj

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Nice work you've done it look almost like the real thing. I remember that engine well I had a 240 six in my 72 F100 dammed strong engine and ran very well to. Keep up the good work I'll have to follow this, did you make prints if so how much to get a set?

Thanks,
Todd
 

gbritnell

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I have most of the drawings finished. As I make the parts I go back and make the necessary changes to the drawings. I should have them complete and corrected by the end of March.
gbritnell
 

Rick124

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Wow that's nice. You just made me realize how much I don't know.lol
 

Pitchfire

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I love the I6. It has the stroke of a diesel and makes for a really clean engine compartment. Excellent work (at the risk of understatement).
 

gbritnell

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The intake and exhaust manifolds were next. The intake was a fairly simple machining exercise, take a piece of aluminum, drill and ream it from both ends then cut out the runner and flange areas. The through hole would be end plugged and finished later.

The exhaust on the other hand had quite a few design issues to resolve. Here again a simpler design would have worked much easier but in keeping with trying to replicate the full sized engine I wanted to make it as close as possible. The first thing was how to get the porting from horizontal to vertical to horizontal with a 90 degree bend then vertical again. This would call for a fabrication with some welding or silver soldering depending on the material used. My choices were brass and steel with the former much easier to machine and then possibly having it plated with nickel but I have never used brass for this type of manifold so I went with steel.

The first operation was to drill the ports from the head side followed by drilling from the bottom of the main runner. This would give my my first right angle bend. The next step was to mill a trough with a ball mill along the bottom of the runner giving me my second passage. With the drilling finished I started profiling the manifold. As the full sized piece is a casting I tried to replicate some of the shapes including the ribbing along the face. The hardest step was making a custom cutter to undercut the mounting flange where it joins the main runner. I made a cutter from drill rod that was the proper thickness and had a large radius on on corner to give me the proper inside shape.

gbritnell

- - - Updated - - -

To cap over the slot I had made in the bottom of the main runner I cut a piece of stock with a matching radius that would fit up inside the runner. To hold it in place I would need to use some small clamps when silver soldering so I left small tabs along the length to keep it as flush as possible.

I wanted to do all the soldering at one time so prior to this operation I had to fabricate the outlet box and flange. This would give my the final right angle bend. The collector box was made as was the outlet flange and these 2 pieces were soldered together with a higher temperature silver solder.

gbritnell

- - - Updated - - -

I apologize for the stack up of pictures but I didn't realize that when I replied to the thread that it would gang up the reply with the previous post.

Anyway, once the parts were ready for soldering everything was cleaned up, fluxed and and clamped together. I tried to heat the whole piece evenly to prevent any warping.

gbritnell

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xalky

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"jawdrop:Wow! I'm pretty speechless. That's an incredible undertaking. I can't even imagine the amount of hours that goes into something like this. Besides all the skill involved. AMAZING!
 
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George, that is a fantastic project, and I wish to thank you for posting it here! Excellent work!
 

gbritnell

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With the silver soldering complete it was time to start benching, or better explained as burring, stoning, filing and polishing. All the edges needed radii, the flanges need angles and radii and the ribbing needed the corners rounded.
For such a simple looking piece there was a great amount of time and work in it. A couple of the pictures show just some of the metal that was burred and filed from the manifold.
gbritnell

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MikeWi

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Ok, I know this is a scale project, and I was plenty impressed already, but that last picture with the quarter for scale just blew my mind. There's no hint from the other pictures (yes, I know you mention sizes in the text) that make you think it's that small. Amazing work.
 

Kevinb71

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Only one way to describe work like this. AMAZING
 

gbritnell

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The next pieces were the rocker cover, oil pan, tappet cover and bellhousing. These were all made from 6061 aluminum. All of these were machined from solid blocks using manual machines, no CNC.
gbritnell

- - - Updated - - -

Here's some finish pictures of the bellhousing.
gbritnell

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burtonbr

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Just freakin AWESOME!
Thanks for sharing.
 

Pitchfire

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Please forgive my saying so, but this thread is terribly tragic to see. Your skill and the project are phenomenal. I just can't escape the thought that much time and talent is going in to something (forgive me for saying so) so trivial.

I realize that it has practical value in testing skills and developing new techniques/workarounds, but I can't escape the feeling that it's like putting a skilled neurosurgeon at the end of the Hasbro line testing "Operation," playsets for Q.C..
 
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gbritnell

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Hi Pitchfire,
No offense taken. It probably would help to know a little of my background and that would better explain my passion. I'll make this as short as possible.
I'm 69 years old.
I grew up in what I consider the heyday of cars and hot rods, late 50's through the early 70's. I drag raced and worked on cars and engines so I have a pretty extensive if not outdated by today's standards of engine design.
I have always been interested in model building starting off with plastic and continuing to the present.
After getting out of the Army in the late 60's I started an apprenticeship with the Ford Motor Co. as a metal patternmaker. Upon completion I worked in the shop until being transferred to the pattern design area designing and drawing patterns and coreboxes.
For the last 10 years at Ford I became a CAD modeler and cutter path creator.
I got my first lathe at 16 although I had no idea how to use it.
In the early 70's I bought an Enco round column mill and used it for the vast majority of my work. I only upgraded my mill in the last couple of years. All of my work is machined by hand, no CNC.
Now to the bottom line.
Although there is no practical use for what I build it is my hobby and like I said earlier my passion. Combining my knowledge of engines, my trade skills, my design background I create things, engines, transmissions, rifles and parts for all the people in my neighborhood when their lawnmowers quit working.
I hope this gives you a little more insight into what I do?
gbritnell
 

Vavet

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My hat is off to you. This is amazing work.

Just to clarify...all of the pieces you've made have started as solid blocks and you've machined away everything that was not needed?

I had a 300 L6 in my 95 F150 and did a lot of work on it over the years so you're bringing back some memories for me.

I can't even find time to wash my car - and you can make a scale replica of an IC engine.

Please pardon my ignorance. Will this engine run when you are finished? I assume it will at least be able to rotate, but I'm wondering if it will have an operational fuel delivery and ignition system.
 

gbritnell

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Hi Vavet,
Yes the engine will run. It has spark plugs and an electronic ignition. I use pump gas, 86 octane for fuel. It is liquid cooled and splash oiled.

Here's today's update on pieces.
With all the major components built I started on the bolt on pieces, distributor, which works, fuel pump, oil filter, alternator and starter. Although these last parts don't work they have been added to this engine to make it look like the full sized engine. They could be left off but the intent was to make somewhat of a replica engine that runs.
gbritnell

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savarin

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It is awesome seeing what a master of his craft can accomplish.
I wish I could watch you in the workshop.
Many thanks for showing this.
 

gbritnell

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Here's some photos of the water pump. I machined the pump body to use a stacked ball bearing at the nose but for the present time I'm going to use a bronze plain bearing. As you can see I have made provision for an O ring to seal the shaft. The body is aluminum, the shaft is stainless steel and the impeller is bronze.
gbritnell

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wpala

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Wow Bravo!!! this is just stunning !!after seeing this I'm not sure if I ever post any of my projects they just look like child play compere to yours masterpiece I wish I could find a person with your talents around here and so he could become my mentor I have so much to learn in this is not funny anyway I want to see a Youtube of this engine run

Thanks for sharing this project

Paul
 

gbritnell

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The final pieces to the engine are the carburetor, air filter housing and motor mounts. The carburetor is based on the model airplane, air bleed type. After much experimentation over the years with different types of carbs I have settled on this design for simplicity of manufacture and relatively easy adjustability. Along the way on this build things have been tweaked and modified, all the while keeping up with the drawings. I do have a few things yet to complete like putting keyways into the crankshaft, making gaskets and spark plug boots and wires. I hope to try and start it by the end of March.
I'll keep everyone updated.
gbritnell

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12bolts

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Absolutely brilliant!!
Couple of questions, are those front engine mounts indicative of the real thing? Theyre really beefy, in a good way tho.
And did you make the spark plugs as well?
What starting method will you use to fire it up?
Please put up a video of it running when you get done

Cheers Phil
 

Pacer

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" an Enco round column mill and used it for the vast majority of my work."

In case you skimmed over this comment casually thrown in by George, read it again -- "a round column mill"

I have read and followed many of Georges projects prior to this one and they were all done on the often reviled round column mill, so next time you are thinking of bad mouthing that lowly design, think of Georges magnificent creations...

You rock George!
 

gbritnell

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Hi Phil,
No those motor mounts aren't a copy of the real thing. The bosses on the block are but the mounts are made to stabilize the engine for operation.
Yes I made the plugs. The thread is 8-36. They had to be smaller to get in between the push rod bosses.
The shells of the plugs were turned and threaded then put into my dividing head to machine the hex. From there they were mounted in a threaded bushing to cut the material away from the extension on the end of the threaded portion.
The extra prong was filed off and the other was heated and bent to form the ground strap. The insulators are made from Corian. This is a temperature resistant material used for making counter tops. They were turned and drilled for a .03 center electrode. The insulators were then inserted into the shells and the flange was crimped over to hold the insulator in place. The brass top was soldered onto the center wired and this was set in place with high temperature Loctite adhesive.
If you'll note in one of the pictures of the flywheel you'll see a boss on the rear. There will be a one-way bearing pressed in. I use a battery operated drill with a hardened dowel inserted into the one-way bearing to turn the engine over.

You can see from this video link how I start my 302 V-8 engine. I will use the same thing for this engine.
http://youtu.be/fRVYYtdhG_8

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AuburnScorch

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All I can say is WOW! I am absolutely delighted to be able to simply locate the switch to turn on my lathe. There are incredible people roaming the machining world--HE is ONE.
 
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