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POTD- PROJECT OF THE DAY: What Did You Make In Your Shop Today?

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silverhawk

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On my heavy 10 project, I bought a tailstock off eBay that had a drill chuck and a tailstock screw stuck in it.




I think the seller didn't realize it was a left-hand screw, but it was jammed in there so well, I had to use vice grips to get the screw out. The screw had been chopped off (it wasn't the original length any more). I bought some left-handed 1/2" ACME threaded rod, turned it down till the threads were gone, and then Loc-tite'd the features on (later pinned once the Loc-tite dried). I used the original screw to get dimensions.

Just a note, I'd advice you to Loc-tite and pin the piece for the features BEFORE you turn those features down - so that you can be concentric. Still, I was lucky enough to go oversize, so I could get it all centered up. I ended up with a fully functional tailstock, with a Jacobs drill chuck on an arbor.




Kindly ignore my high-tech drawing. I took those numbers from the shorter screw, and tried to measure the length of screw I needed (I actually needed a little more).
 

BGHansen

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POTD was repairing my 10” Craftsman table saw blade tilt function. I toasted the original motor around 30 yrs. ago and replaced it with a HF 2 HP motor. I made a stand for my 6” joiner and table saw out of angle iron and plywood, used the joiner to straighten an edge before sawing. Also made rips ~1/32” oversized, then joined the edge to clean off the saw marks. Made sense to tie the two tools together on one stand.

The replacement motor lasted a few years, then cooked that one too. I’d replaced it with a Baldour 1 ½ HP industrial commercial motor which has served me well for the last 25 years. Down side was the motor is longer than the HF motor, so didn’t quite fit the stand. I knew that if I tilted the blade on the table saw, I had to manual lift the motor to keep it from catching on the angle iron. I knew it so no big deal.

Well, fast forward a few years and my better half was using the saw. I told her about the crank on the side to change the blade angle, but neglected to tell her that there’s a clamp bolt on the front of the saw above the height crank that locks the arbor. Didn’t tell her about the motor interference either. The woman has some arm strength and bent the heck out of the table base side plate.

The arbor tilts by a shaft that screws into the saw arbor housing/casting. The opposite end where it passes out the saw cabinet has a ball pinned to the shaft. One half of the socket is a stamping that screws to the cabinet which has the other half of the socket. She managed to put some pretty good bends in the side of the cabinet and trash the stamped inside ball socket. Time for a proper repair.


Top side of the 10" table saw
20190413_114437.jpg

Tilt crank under the RH side
20190413_114446.jpg

Hard to see in the photo, but the side of the cabinet was bent from cranking the tilt hand wheel with the arbor assembly locked in place.
20190413_161201.jpg

Inside the saw, you can see the bent sheet metal here. The inside ball socket bracket is on the LH side of the photo.
20190413_161208.jpg


Used a piece of ¼” thick mystery CRS for the new inside ball socket plate. Spot drilled and drilled ¼” mounting holes which matched the spacing of the existing cabinet holes. Drilled out the center hole with a ½” drill.

Spot drill the inside half ball socket bracket
20190414_105922.jpg

Drilled 1/4" clearance holes
20190414_110301.jpg

1/2" center hole in prep for cutting the ball socket
20190414_110850.jpg


My Bridgeport has a circa 1983 Anilam Crusader 2-axis CNC set up. One of the G-codes is G76, circular hole milling. This is a REALLY handy routine: Set the cutter on the circle center, plug in the hole diameter, cutter diameter and issue G76. The path moves on a 45 deg. angle (1:30) and stops just short of the circle edge. Then does a path change to come onto the tangent point of the circle at 12 o’clock and continues to make a circle going CCW (climb cutting). Finishes the circle at 12 o’clock, pulls off the perimeter to 10:30, then returns to center. I used the G76 routine with a 3/8” end mill to hog out a ¾” hole for the start of the ball socket.


Used a 3/8" end mill and a CNC routine to open the 1/2" hole to a 3/4" clearance hole
20190414_112633.jpg


Then changed to a ¾” ball end mill to cut the socket. The ball on the table saw tilt shaft mic’d at 0.985”, so I plugged in a 0.99” circle diameter and a ¾” end mill. Ran the G76 routine again to make the half-socket. Advanced the tool a bit for each pass until the hole measured 0.99”.


3/4" ball end mill running a CNC routine to cut a 0.990" diameter hole
20190414_113640.jpg

Kept stepping the cut down until the original 3/4" hole was opened to 0.990"
20190414_114139.jpg


The ball on the tilt shaft is pinned, depth in the socket on the original stamped bracket was to the middle of the spring pin. So made passes with the ¾” ball end mill until dry-fitting the tilt shaft was midway on the spring pin.


Original stamped bracket on the tilt shaft ball; looked to be half-way deep on the spring pin
20190414_114231.jpg

Checked for depth on the new ball socket bracket with the tilt shaft ball
20190414_115017.jpg


I reinforce the outside of the saw cabinet with a piece of ¼” aluminum bar stock. Held the aluminum on the outside of the cabinet and traced the hole with a paint marker. Set the bar stock on the mill and used a laser center finder to find X (though nothing critical). Our son was home from college so it was a good time to show him the technique. I didn’t hold the aluminum at the center in Y when tracing the hole, so found center of the tracing with the laser, zero’d X, then moved Y to the middle of the aluminum and zero’d.


Roughly found the center of a paint marked hole from the saw cabinet. Plan was to position for X with the laser, then move Y to the center of the aluminum plate
20190414_115912.jpg


Drilled ¼” holes for tying the reinforcing plate to the cabinet, mounting holes for the ball socket bracket and a center hole.


1/4" mounting holes and center clearance hole
20190414_120348.jpg


Plan was to hog out a clearance hole in the center to clear the stamped cabinet side of the ball socket. Diameter was 1.125”, so used G76 again with a 1.125” diameter hole and a 1/2” end mill.

20190414_121546.jpg


Set the aluminum reinforcing plate in place and positioned it with a couple of ¼” bolts. Transfer punched the position of the mounting bolts. Drilled the clearance holes and bolted the inside ball socket plate and outer reinforcing plate in place.


Transfer punching the upper/lower mounting holes for the reinforcing plate
20190414_122732.jpg

Outside plate bolted in place
20190414_133735.jpg

Inside view of the new half-ball socket bracket
20190414_133742.jpg

Outside of the reinforcement and cleared out hand room for the hand wheel
20190414_133750.jpg


Works wonderfully! I took advantage of the saw being unbolted to the clear away some of the wooden frame for the side extension table, kept rubbing my hand on the edge. Also repositioned the saw on the stand so I no longer have to fiddle with holding the motor “just so” to tilt the saw blade.


20190414_141643.jpg

20190414_142331.jpg


Thanks for looking.

Bruce
 
Last edited:

Robo_Pi

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Nice repair on the Craftsman saw Bruce. :encourage:

So many people are so busy lately. Too many projects to comment on.

I'm working on trying to put a new clutch in my old Ford pick-up. I'm just getting started and removing the driveshaft has become a major event. The bolts for the center bearing are going to need to be cut off. Too close to the gas tank to be using a cutting torch. Gonna try to grind them off being careful where I shoot the grinding sparks. Its pouring rain outside now, that's where I'm working on it. So maybe tomorrow I'll get the drive shaft off.

I take it one step at a time around here.
 

f350ca

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Finished this tonight. Took a couple of evenings, my soldering is a little rusty but the 1500 watt Weller soldering gun pulled through.
292661

Hoping spring is someday going to come prompted me to build a filter for the garden water. I water out of a small pond, but debris plays havoc with sprinklers. Milled slots in the center 1 1/2 ABS pipe then soldered a super fine brass screen around it. The water will enter through the T go out through the screen and exit from the end pipe.

292662
292663

Greg
 

Robo_Pi

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Finished this tonight. Took a couple of evenings, my soldering is a little rusty but the 1500 watt Weller soldering gun pulled through.
View attachment 292661

Greg
Hey Greg, I'm in love with your Steampunkish Nixie Tube thingy.

I've always wanted to build something with Nixie Tubes. Your project just reminded me that I have some old Nixie tubes I bought when I was quite young. By golly I still have them. I have 14 of them in this drawer: :grin:

Nixie (1).JPG

And lo and behold the tech sheet and schematic is in there too.

I didn't catch the top of the document in the photo, but it's from Radio Shack >>>--Archer--> brand. It's Nixie Numerical Indicator.

It calls out all the pinouts and specs.

INixie (2).JPG

On the back side is a full schematic for hooking up a single tube with a 7490 counter so the tube will count up from 0 to 9 repeatedly.

Nixie (3).JPG

Of course, that's just to show how it works. Then you can hook it up to display whatever numerical values you want.

I have 14 of these. I really should do something with them. I've had these laying around for at least 5 or 6 decades. I wonder if they'll still work? Do they have a shelf life? Or are they virtually eternal if never used?
 

savarin

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I needed some thin brass shims.
Drilled a 6mm dole in some mild steel, turned a 6mm spigot to fit, inserted the spigot in the drill, set it in the hole, clamped the die to the drill table.
shim-1.jpg
Punched a bunch of holes, I was amazed at how easy this was.
Cut the holes from the sheet and tightened then between 2 washers
shim-2.jpg
and turned them round.
shim-3.jpg
 

GoceKU

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Today i had to fix my brother's Ford, the power steering is leaking he took it to couple of shops where they replaced a bunch of parts but it will still leak when parked, from logic only place where it will leak when cold is the reservar, so i left it over night and with a torch i found the leak coming in between the pump and the reservar, took it apart and found the reservar has changed shape and is now egg shape instead of round. So i decided to make a metal sleeve to press in it, to help it keep its shape, i started with some 14mm solid steel C45 grade, drill it with a smaller drill first then with the right size, this made lot of heat and discolored the piece, the outside needed to be little smaller then the original size of the rod, so i took my small belt sander and took couple passes and chamfer the end, then i put new o rings and some silicone and assembled it, such a ridiculous problem to have, as many problems seam to be on this mondeo.
IMG_20190413_192202.jpgIMG_20190414_163504.jpgIMG_20190414_163755.jpgIMG_20190414_164337.jpgIMG_20190414_165111.jpgIMG_20190414_165256_1.jpg
 

GoceKU

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Today i'm back on fixing the little Niva, first i fired up the grinder and flatten back the welds on the two front patch panels. Then i taped back the rubber grommet on the other bumper mount and grounded all the bubbling paint to bare steel, then i sprayed some anti rust acid, i'll need to make a patch for here. But it was getting late to make noise so i started taking apart the front suspension, i remove the wheel bearing oil seals and wirebrushed everything then i sprayed everything with some of the new anti rust acid. This was hard and dirty work, removing all the old grease and washing the bearings, the wheel hub has some scratches, looks like wheel bearing has span, i'll need to measure it and ether weld and turn it down or knurling.
IMG_20190416_170038.jpgIMG_20190416_170042.jpgIMG_20190416_170053.jpgIMG_20190416_194638.jpg
 

savarin

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Whilst not technically a machining task I did do some mechanical work.
My neighbor woke me up this morning at10 am, well I am retired, with the news my aquaponic system was leaking and watering his yard.
I knew there was a leak somewhere and had been trying to find it for the last 3 days with no success.
This morning it was easy, water was pouring over one of the grow beds.
Some bird set bush tomatoes had set root in three of the beds and I thought I would see how much fruit they produced.
It was a lot but they were taking a long time to ripen and their root system had gone ballistic and clogged the auto drains so the bed flooded and overflowed.
Time to remove them. I should have taken a before shot as this is after they were removed.
aqua-1.jpg

Now for the mechanical part that was also todays job.
I had built a shredder from some old popular mechanics plans a few years ago utilizing an old lawnmower and had to rebuild the pulley system and get a new motor for it.
shredder-1.jpg
absolutely required for this job as there was a barrow load of tomato plants to pulverise for compost.
shredder-2.jpg

And it made this much
shredder-3.jpg
 

richl

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I've been in desperate need of a metal storage area. The collection of metal was becoming too cumbersome. The collection of random buckets filled with stuff was a pain to sort they to figure out what I had. I dumped everything on the floor and started at it for 3 days, it was strategically placed in the center of the floor and in front of the lathe. I couldn't work at the lathe and it was a royal pain to get to the mill lol20190417_220403.jpg
So after 3 days of nothing happening in the shop and staring at the pile I got serious...
I drew up several plans, made a decision made a material cut sheet, packed up saw, straight edge, clamps and extra batteries and made a lowes material run.
I have a smaller SUV, I can not fit big sheets of plywood in it, they need to be cut up. I found one of their flat roller carts, loaded 3 sheets of 3/4" plywood on it. Headed out to the parkinglot and cut up everything to size, loaded it into the suv and drove home.
At the shop I only needed to cut pieces for the shelf cleats guess and screw it all together.
Finished product
20190418_182144.jpg20190418_182203.jpg
It seems to be just what I needed. Also storage of shop fixtures. I'm happy
 

GoceKU

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Today i spent some time in my overalls grinding the rest of the rust from the front panel, and then i gave it a coat of primer, i disassemble the headlight brackets and did them as well, then come the hard job of wirebrashing the front suspension and applying a coat of direct to rust primer to stop the rust and prolong the life of the parts, hard dirty job.
IMG_20190418_172011.jpgIMG_20190418_172018.jpgIMG_20190418_172032.jpgIMG_20190418_172043.jpg
 

GoceKU

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It's way past midnight by the time i got back home, but decided i need to finish at least one job on the little niva tonight, so i decided it should be assembling the hub i disassembled, the brake disk is mounted on the inside and is all hold down with the wheel studs, i did a bit of setting up on my shop press and settled the studs and the brake disk. From disassembling it, i know the studs have not been installed properly and the disk was loose, so i check the other side and it also wasn't done correctly, this car has new disks so whoever changed them never fitted the wheel studs in all the way. The second disk did took a lot more pressure to get them fitted and made a loud pop and all 5 of them. As for my shop press, i know the bottle jack is leaking a lot, and the entire thing needs to be retired but still seems to get the job done.
IMG_20190420_112528.jpgIMG_20190420_111651.jpg
 

mmcmdl

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On my lunchtime I cooked up a rocket stove from parts I've been collecting out of the scrap bin . After the engineering time , machine time , along with the original costs of the scrap parts , I figure this thing is worth bout $9 grand or so :grin: LMAO , at least it kept me busy for an hour . :encourage:

Can't load pics now but maybe tomorrow . ( it is pretty cool looking )
 

GoceKU

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Well happy easter to everyone, after my last post i keep on work and pulled an allnighter, and assembled the drivers side upright, bearings, new seals all installed packed with grease. Then i went over to the Little Niva and checked the tie rod end, it has a broken boot but the joint it self is tight, so i went over my spares and took off a good boot from a bull joint from an renault alpine that happens to be the right size, because it was open i decided to drill and tap it for a zerk fitting, this way it will be a serviceable item, next to be installed was the freshly rebuilt axle, installed with new spring washers and teflon nuts. Then i installed the upper a arm and then i put on the hub and install all new stainless hardware, then i tested the new wheels by jacking up the suspension, and checking for wheel rub thru the suspension travel and it fits great, then come the hard part, installing the front spring, the car is on jack stands, and they are in the middle, which makes it very unstable, also is very light, so as soon as i started to compress the spring it started lifting so i started loading the corner with every heavy thing i had to hand, little by little i did manage to assemble it without injuries or damage, it took me about 6 hours to finish this corner, but i took my time and install anti seize on all the bolts, also drill tap and install a zerk fitting on the top ball joint and grease them, there's not room to fit one to the bottom one.
IMG_20190420_114503.jpgIMG_20190420_122327.jpgIMG_20190420_123105.jpgIMG_20190420_125030.jpgIMG_20190420_130555.jpgIMG_20190420_134417.jpgIMG_20190420_142814.jpgIMG_20190420_154208.jpgIMG_20190420_154222.jpg
 

GoceKU

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Today i focused my time to making the drivers side front corner 100% finished, this involved having to fabricate an coil spring perch from some flatstock, i've ordered this from 3 separate places and goten answers like is on it way, it got lost, other college sold it and did not tell me. And three weeks later i have not part, after talking to other, this part because of its design holds mud and rust out very quickly its hard to keep them on a shelf. So i decided to change the design and make it from 1/4 inch flatstock, i had a hard time beating the pieces in shape with a hammer but i got them to fit right, this part also holds the upper bump stop and i made a mount for it also. Then i grounded all the edges and turned my attention to the inner splash guard for the front fenders, give them good wirebrashing and spray with anti rust acid, after a short brake i painted the mount and the splash guards with a thick coat of primer. Today was one of those days lots of work with little to show for it.
IMG_20190421_173549.jpgIMG_20190421_175242.jpgIMG_20190421_181423.jpgIMG_20190421_181418.jpg
 

Billh51

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POTD was repairing my 10” Craftsman table saw blade tilt function. I toasted the original motor around 30 yrs. ago and replaced it with a HF 2 HP motor. I made a stand for my 6” joiner and table saw out of angle iron and plywood, used the joiner to straighten an edge before sawing. Also made rips ~1/32” oversized, then joined the edge to clean off the saw marks. Made sense to tie the two tools together on one stand.

The replacement motor lasted a few years, then cooked that one too. I’d replaced it with a Baldour 1 ½ HP industrial commercial motor which has served me well for the last 25 years. Down side was the motor is longer than the HF motor, so didn’t quite fit the stand. I knew that if I tilted the blade on the table saw, I had to manual lift the motor to keep it from catching on the angle iron. I knew it so no big deal.

Well, fast forward a few years and my better half was using the saw. I told her about the crank on the side to change the blade angle, but neglected to tell her that there’s a clamp bolt on the front of the saw above the height crank that locks the arbor. Didn’t tell her about the motor interference either. The woman has some arm strength and bent the heck out of the table base side plate.

The arbor tilts by a shaft that screws into the saw arbor housing/casting. The opposite end where it passes out the saw cabinet has a ball pinned to the shaft. One half of the socket is a stamping that screws to the cabinet which has the other half of the socket. She managed to put some pretty good bends in the side of the cabinet and trash the stamped inside ball socket. Time for a proper repair.


Top side of the 10" table saw
View attachment 292576

Tilt crank under the RH side
View attachment 292577

Hard to see in the photo, but the side of the cabinet was bent from cranking the tilt hand wheel with the arbor assembly locked in place.
View attachment 292578

Inside the saw, you can see the bent sheet metal here. The inside ball socket bracket is on the LH side of the photo.
View attachment 292579


Used a piece of ¼” thick mystery CRS for the new inside ball socket plate. Spot drilled and drilled ¼” mounting holes which matched the spacing of the existing cabinet holes. Drilled out the center hole with a ½” drill.

Spot drill the inside half ball socket bracket
View attachment 292581

Drilled 1/4" clearance holes
View attachment 292582

1/2" center hole in prep for cutting the ball socket
View attachment 292583


My Bridgeport has a circa 1983 Anilam Crusader 2-axis CNC set up. One of the G-codes is G76, circular hole milling. This is a REALLY handy routine: Set the cutter on the circle center, plug in the hole diameter, cutter diameter and issue G76. The path moves on a 45 deg. angle (1:30) and stops just short of the circle edge. Then does a path change to come onto the tangent point of the circle at 12 o’clock and continues to make a circle going CCW (climb cutting). Finishes the circle at 12 o’clock, pulls off the perimeter to 10:30, then returns to center. I used the G76 routine with a 3/8” end mill to hog out a ¾” hole for the start of the ball socket.


Used a 3/8" end mill and a CNC routine to open the 1/2" hole to a 3/4" clearance hole
View attachment 292584


Then changed to a ¾” ball end mill to cut the socket. The ball on the table saw tilt shaft mic’d at 0.985”, so I plugged in a 0.99” circle diameter and a ¾” end mill. Ran the G76 routine again to make the half-socket. Advanced the tool a bit for each pass until the hole measured 0.99”.


3/4" ball end mill running a CNC routine to cut a 0.990" diameter hole
View attachment 292585

Kept stepping the cut down until the original 3/4" hole was opened to 0.990"
View attachment 292586


The ball on the tilt shaft is pinned, depth in the socket on the original stamped bracket was to the middle of the spring pin. So made passes with the ¾” ball end mill until dry-fitting the tilt shaft was midway on the spring pin.


Original stamped bracket on the tilt shaft ball; looked to be half-way deep on the spring pin
View attachment 292587

Checked for depth on the new ball socket bracket with the tilt shaft ball
View attachment 292588


I reinforce the outside of the saw cabinet with a piece of ¼” aluminum bar stock. Held the aluminum on the outside of the cabinet and traced the hole with a paint marker. Set the bar stock on the mill and used a laser center finder to find X (though nothing critical). Our son was home from college so it was a good time to show him the technique. I didn’t hold the aluminum at the center in Y when tracing the hole, so found center of the tracing with the laser, zero’d X, then moved Y to the middle of the aluminum and zero’d.


Roughly found the center of a paint marked hole from the saw cabinet. Plan was to position for X with the laser, then move Y to the center of the aluminum plate
View attachment 292589


Drilled ¼” holes for tying the reinforcing plate to the cabinet, mounting holes for the ball socket bracket and a center hole.


1/4" mounting holes and center clearance hole
View attachment 292591


Plan was to hog out a clearance hole in the center to clear the stamped cabinet side of the ball socket. Diameter was 1.125”, so used G76 again with a 1.125” diameter hole and a 1/2” end mill.

View attachment 292592


Set the aluminum reinforcing plate in place and positioned it with a couple of ¼” bolts. Transfer punched the position of the mounting bolts. Drilled the clearance holes and bolted the inside ball socket plate and outer reinforcing plate in place.


Transfer punching the upper/lower mounting holes for the reinforcing plate
View attachment 292593

Outside plate bolted in place
View attachment 292594

Inside view of the new half-ball socket bracket
View attachment 292595

Outside of the reinforcement and cleared out hand room for the hand wheel
View attachment 292596


Works wonderfully! I took advantage of the saw being unbolted to the clear away some of the wooden frame for the side extension table, kept rubbing my hand on the edge. Also repositioned the saw on the stand so I no longer have to fiddle with holding the motor “just so” to tilt the saw blade.


View attachment 292597

View attachment 292598


Thanks for looking.

Bruce
Nice fix, as always Bruce
 

Barncat

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Didn't really make anything today. But finally got the last part of my tool and cutter grinder un-seized. I thought I got a good auction deal, turned into a fixer-upper. Almost all table feeds and head adjustments were rusted together. This last one, the tilt for the grinder head was the worst. Let it sit in a bucket of acetone/atf for two weeks, then remounted it to hold it securely, then finally broke it free with a giant pipe wrench with a cheater bar on the end. IMG_20190421_072352418.jpg
 

jdedmon91

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I posted a few weeks ago when I mounted my Shars quill DRO on my mill. Here is the video


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

Rex Walters

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I dumped everything on the floor and [stared] at it for 3 days, it was strategically placed in the center of the floor and in front of the lathe. I couldn't work at the lathe and it was a royal pain to get to the mill
My kind of motivational strategery!
 

GoceKU

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Today i had very little time to spare but did managed, to weld up the front hole under the front bumper mount, then i grounded the welds and painted it with primer, then i marked and drill the front wings for the new side indicators, i did prime over the fresh holes on the drivers side but left the passengers side because needs a lot more welding around that spot.
IMG_20190421_184833.jpgIMG_20190421_151431.jpgIMG_20190421_152134.jpg
 
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