POTD- PROJECT OF THE DAY: What Did You Make In Your Shop Today?

Downunder Bob

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Yeah someone took an angle grinder and cut the bed to make room for bigger things to turn, i would never do that to a machine. You can see in this thread when i bought this machine the old machinist was using it to turn engormast flanges.
I can understand sometimes. I often wish my lathe came with a gap. but unfortunately it didn't, it's the only model in the range without a gap. But I'm stuck with it, other than that I'm very happy with it as is, just have to modify design sometimes so it will fit.
 

Downunder Bob

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So whats wrong with a diy gap? Probably affects nothing else but resale value
I hear you, I have definitely thought about it, but have always found another way. on some machines it might weaken it, but that one looks pretty robust. If I had acquired a machine like that I think I would at l;east try to tidy it up, so it looks like it belongs there.
 

BGHansen

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POTD was starting to fab up an enclosure for my Tormach mill. The guy I bought the mill from had made a full enclosure, but I didn't like the design. The panels were 3/32" steel welded in place; no access to the sides and back of the mill.

My plan is to have sliding doors on the front which are attached to either a hinged frame, or quick pop-off panels. That way I have complete access to the front of the mill. Same for the sides; either hinged panels or panels that lift off for full access. For now, the back will be covered with a shower curtain.

I'm using a product called Creform tubing for the frame. It's stainless steel tubing a little over 1" diameter. I found a bunch of it in a CL listing and have been using it to make racks and legs for various things in my shop. There are many variations of brackets available for tying it together. Makes for a pretty quick and sturdy structure.

Photos are of where I'm at after a day. Mounted a couple of 100W LED lights which may have to go. They came with the mill and do a great job throwing light on the table, almost to the point of too much light. I may end up with just one 5000 lumen LED shop light over the door area. More to follow as I make progress.

Thanks for looking, Bruce


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Cadillac STS

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Something to consider with making the enclosure for the CNC mill is making it easy to use flood cooling and cleaning up after the job.

Move all electrical items out of the box area. Make the enclosure to have sides that open and front doors. Can circulate coolant for flood cooling but also to a spray hose like a garden hose on the system. That way when the job is done open one side or the other reach in and spray down all the chips down into the bottom where they are screened out of the coolant.

That is how it worked on a HAAS mill that I was able to use for a while. Nothing inside the enclosure that could not be wet down with coolant and spray it all down at the end of the job nice and clean.

Side doors are key for cleaning.
 

ttabbal

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Been working on some AXA tool holders. I decided to cut the dovetail first, so roughed out the slot and used a dovetail cutter from there. I went about 0.100 from each side and wound up slightly over the size I was aiming for, measure earlier next time. Doesn't matter for this though, I have a couple that are a little bigger than this and they work fine. Pulled the post from the lathe and it fits up nicely and locks securely.

IMG_20200328_145554.jpg

I just used a ruler on the bandsaw, then milled them square again. Wound up with a 0.020 max height variation. Other than two intentionally short ones. The short ones were the last bit of the bar. Could have made one full height and scrap or two little ones. Figure I can cut them for 1/4" or maybe make a couple of boring bar holders for micro100 and similar size tools.

IMG_20200328_180400.jpg

Leaning towards not leveling the others out. I have close to that much difference in the Chinesium holders I have from various sources.

Still need to cut the tool slots and drill/tap the hold down screws. Thinking about ordering a bag of cap screws from McMaster for them and the other ones to replace the grub screws.
 

BGHansen

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Something to consider with making the enclosure for the CNC mill is making it easy to use flood cooling and cleaning up after the job.

Move all electrical items out of the box area. Make the enclosure to have sides that open and front doors. Can circulate coolant for flood cooling but also to a spray hose like a garden hose on the system. That way when the job is done open one side or the other reach in and spray down all the chips down into the bottom where they are screened out of the coolant.

That is how it worked on a HAAS mill that I was able to use for a while. Nothing inside the enclosure that could not be wet down with coolant and spray it all down at the end of the job nice and clean.

Side doors are key for cleaning.
Thanks for the tip. The current flood coolant set up has a wash down hose with a garden hose sprayer on it. I also have a Mistaway air filter that'll get mounted up top.

Going to make up a power panel too to manage all of the 110 stuff. I'll have a switch for the controller/spindle LED/spindle fan. Separate one for the lights, one for the compressor and one or two more for other stuff.

Bruce
 

dirty tools

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Last summer I put my H1 on its roof
today I started the repairs
i took the tires and rims in for repairs and balancing.
the radiator is ready to be taken in for acid cleansing and repairs.
I have replacement mirrors and what install them after the roof is fixed and repainted
 

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BGHansen

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3/32" steel! WOW overkill, no wonder you are changing to something more manageable.
Well, it worked for him at the time, but. . . He made a frame from 1" square tubing and tack TIG'd 0.090" steel panels in place. He cut a couple of access holes in the back to access the ATC. He is 30 and had no problem hopping up into the enclosure to clean out chips, etc. I'm 60 and didn't need to get steps on my Fitbit by climbing around the machine.

Biggest problem was he didn't manage the coolant back to the chip pan very well. Coolant hit the steel panels and ran down and out the gaps in the panels/tubing. He caulked up everything, but the enclosure had to be cut apart to get it off the mill.

I figure everything needs to be managed like a roof. Shingle everything back to the chip pan. I won't be 100% successful, but should be close. I tend to go heavy on the flood coolant and it sprays everywhere. Figure there aren't too many downsides to too much coolant as compared to not enough. I was cutting some stainless on my Bridgeport CNC mill once and the mist coolant ran dry. I was working ten feet away, cutting sounded "funny". The carbide end mill was glowing orange, flutes totally filled with welded in chips.

Bruce
 

pdentrem

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Yeah, machine containment has to be properly designed. We have one Haas that is nice and tight but another has a small irritating drip that hits the floor in the foot traffic area. Had to put rubber pref mat there.
Flood coolant works but not the end all. We were cutting a CU/MO matrix material and the parts were potato curls when done. Took a long time to figure it out. Between tools and coolant, it was the amount of coolant that was too much. It was counter to what we all knew.
 

GunsOfNavarone

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Been working on some AXA tool holders. I decided to cut the dovetail first, so roughed out the slot and used a dovetail cutter from there. I went about 0.100 from each side and wound up slightly over the size I was aiming for, measure earlier next time. Doesn't matter for this though, I have a couple that are a little bigger than this and they work fine. Pulled the post from the lathe and it fits up nicely and locks securely.

View attachment 318521

I just used a ruler on the bandsaw, then milled them square again. Wound up with a 0.020 max height variation. Other than two intentionally short ones. The short ones were the last bit of the bar. Could have made one full height and scrap or two little ones. Figure I can cut them for 1/4" or maybe make a couple of boring bar holders for micro100 and similar size tools.

View attachment 318524

Leaning towards not leveling the others out. I have close to that much difference in the Chinesium holders I have from various sources.

Still need to cut the tool slots and drill/tap the hold down screws. Thinking about ordering a bag of cap screws from McMaster for them and the other ones to replace the grub screws.
I'd really like to make some tool holders, but I've never used a dovetail cutter. What is the procedure? I mean, do you use a end mill to cut out the bulk then come back in with the dove tail tool?I assume the you must take very small DOC? I understand that is different depending on the power of your machine, but dovetail tools seem so delicate. Would just love a little advice before trying...
 

pdentrem

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Yes hog out the material with a straight mill. Then follow up with many passes only feeding in side ways (this is the way I do) to form the dovetail. Be sure that the holder for the tool has no oils etc, as the tool tends to be drawn down into the work.

See post #11 It may help

 

ttabbal

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I'd really like to make some tool holders, but I've never used a dovetail cutter. What is the procedure? I mean, do you use a end mill to cut out the bulk then come back in with the dove tail tool?I assume the you must take very small DOC? I understand that is different depending on the power of your machine, but dovetail tools seem so delicate. Would just love a little advice before trying...
I used a 3/4" rougher to remove the bulk of the material. I just matched the size of the slot on the existing holders. Well, I averaged the size anyway. They don't need to be precise, and the import ones take full advantage of that. The domestic might too, I don't own any to compare.

I then ran a normal 3/4 end mill to smooth everything out and take the last 0.020 or so. Probably not necessary as I got a good finish with the rougher.

Then used the dovetail cutter. DOC maxed at 0.040, but only for one pass. I went lower after that as things got hotter than I liked. As you go further into the cut, you use more of the cutter. It's a form tool. I found 0.020 to work great even with most of the cutter engaged.

There are tons of videos on YouTube showing the process, tricks for measuring and such. The actual cut isn't hard though.

The tool I used is from Randy Richards. He has a YouTube channel and makes them for sale. A bit more expensive than the cheap HSS cutters, but uses a carbide insert and is very durable and well made. I found a few reviews saying that the import (cheap) HSS cutters don't hold up. Comparing pricing for name brand tools this one was very reasonable. He has videos that show making tool holders and the dovetail cutter. I could have probably made my own, but figured I already had enough projects for the moment.
 

Suzuki4evr

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I made some spinning tops for my nephews at Christmas time and decided to build another for myself today. I made the outer ring from brass and the center from 6061 aluminum. Bearing is 4mm press fit. Maiden spin was just over 12 minutes.
I found out it's pretty hard to get a good photo of shiny things.





I like shiny things.
 

mksj

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Got tired of fumbling for the allen key for my micrometer stop, I use it routinely because I use an integrated proximity stop system on my ERL-1340. I made new micrometer lock bolts/levers out of O1 steel, the bolts are a M10 1.5 thread on the bottom. The locking bars slide through holes at the top of the bolts, the levers have a pressed in cap on one end and a threaded cap on the other end. I use a spring with a brass pin that fits into the center of the top of each bolt and applies pressure to the sliding bars to keep them in place. Works well, and one less allen key that I do not need to keep track of. Fun project for the day given that I am house bound these days. Stay well, be safe.

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Unlocked
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Locked
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extropic

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Got tired of fumbling for the allen key for my micrometer stop (snip)
Nice work on the lock bolts.
I see something (looks like an aluminum bracket w/ a (possibly) brass round headed something) attached to the saddle, between the ways.
What is that? If there's a write-up about it, some search terms or a link would be great. Thanks.
 

mksj

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It is a lock for the cross slide, the stock gibs lock is covered by the DRO scale. The cross slide lock bolts to the follow rest holes, so easily removed if needed. I uses a bronze lock which pushes against the cross slide, so quite secure and will not wear the cross slide. When my lathe was new and a bit stiffer I did not have an issues with creeping of the cross slide, but as it got worn in I did have some small changes. I also made a similar lock on my 1340GT and used it for many years. I find it much easier to use. I posted this one in the following thread:
 

BGHansen

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POTD was continuing the work on the enclosure for my Tormach mill. I decided to go with front doors that will have slider doors, but will be on a frame that's hinged so the door frames can be swung open to give full access to the mill.

Started by turning some Delrin bushings to fit into the tubular framed doors. Simple lathe job, turn the OD to a snug fit in the Creform tubing, face, chamfer, center drill and drill hinge pin holes.


Face/chamfer the bushing
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Parting
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Center drill and drill a hinge pin hole
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The corners of the enclosure frame will have 1/4" hinge pins. Plan is to have a fixed pin on the bottom and a removable one up top. The door frames will be removed by pulled the upper pin, then lift the door off the lower pin. Naturally, with the hinge they can be swung open too.


Drilling a 1/4" hinge pin hole in the Creform corner bracket.
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Bushing fits over the hinge pin. Door frame tubing fits over the bushing.
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Upper door frame hinge pin will be removable. Plan was to have a bushed hole for the hinge pin.


Drilling the upper bushing hole (F drill for an 0.257" hole for some clearance to the 1/4" pin).
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Turn the OD to 1/2"
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Parting
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Chamfered a lead-in on the top of the bushing.
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Drilled a 1/2" hole through the upper corner brackets for the hinge pin bushings.
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The upper hinge pins were made from 1/4" 303 stainless. Started by running a 1/4"-20 die over the end.
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Parted and flipped, then chamfered the lead-in end.
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Next, made a couple of knobs for the removable hinge pins from aluminum. Did a clean up pass, knurled, tapped and parted. Finished the faced end by screwing the 1/4" pin in place, then chucked and faced.


Clean up pass on some 1" aluminum
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Knurled
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Center drilled, tap drilled, tapped and parted.
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Facing the parted end and the final two upper hinge pins.
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Upper hinge pin into the door frame bushing. The door can be removed by pulling this pin, then lift the door off the lower hinge pin.
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Door frame lower hinge pin.
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Door frames in place. The center area will have door panels that slide open for quick access. The door frames can swing open for full access to the front of the mill.
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As you can see, lots more to do:

Locking pins to hold the door frames in the closed position.
Move the monitor/keyboard swing arm to outside the enclosure.
Fab up a rail system for the front sliding doors.
Make a work table for the overhang at the front of the mill.
Make splash shields for the end panels, and the removable end panels.
Fab up a top.
Shower curtain for the back wall.
Mount the Mistaway air filtration system up top.

Probably a few more things I've forgotten, but am making some progress. Thanks for looking,

Bruce
 

BGHansen

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POTD was making some T-nuts for a Grizzly 7" x 10" tilt table. The T-slots are about 1/2" wide at the top, but the bottom is narrower than what's on my Jet JVM-830 mill, so couldn't use standard 1/2" T-nuts on the table.

Found a piece of 3/4" CRS in my scrap bin. Wrote a quick routine for the CNC Bridgeport to cut the rabbets on the sides.


No hand cranking with CNC, plus an hman chip collector to keep the mess down.
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After the profile was cut, spotted, tap drilled, and power tapped 5/16"-18 holes.


spotting
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tap drilling
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tapping
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finished row of 4 nuts
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fit check in the tilt table. Top of the nuts are about 0.010" from the surface.
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Then to the band saw to cut them apart. I use a small vise to hold short parts when cutting. You can't see it, but there's a block of the same width as the vise on the opposite side of the saw clamp plate to even out the pressure. And YES, a smarter person would flip the vise 180 degrees so the cutting action is pulling the work into the vise, not out of the jaws. . . Fortunately, my lack of attention to details didn't bite me.

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Cleaned up the T-nuts on a 2"x42" belt sander and grinder with a Scotchbrite wheel. Then peened the bottom end and for good measure buggered up the threads with a tapered punch. Didn't want a stud or bolt going completely through the nuts.
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Finished T-nuts
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Thanks for looking,

Bruce
 
Last edited:

tq60

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Another hobby is the yard irrigation system. Somewhat complicated and part of it is pressure control.

It has 3 regulators with 2 that have bypass controls.

There are 5 lines from the main connection with 4 on lowest pressure regulator and the other having 3 possibilities.

Main line comes in via main valve, then a 35 PSI regulator followed by a 25 PSI regulator (both of these have bypass valves).

After the 25 PSI regulator the system splits, main line for yard goes one way and an adjustable regulator that feeds the 4 lines in the garden goes the other way.

Rebuilt the pressure system this year as the bypass valves were bad.

Fully servicabl e noe as we added a bunch of split unions.

But the meters were all over the place.

Sun faded too.

Needed a manifold for mounting meters, wanted a chunk of aluminum but could not find one anywhere.

Scrap yard only had sheet but they had some round stock that planted the seed...

Checked the plastic supply and noting there in the scrap bin.

So back home and we find in the supply pile a chunk of what once was a ram, some sort of nickel steel threaded on the end, about 1.3 diameter and long enough.

Had some swivel 90 degree hose fittings for connection to the system.

We discovered this stuff is a bugger to tap pipe threads.

We cheated a bit, we found one 1/4 pipe tap that had some missing teeth so we ground off about 1/4 inch from the end.

This allowed it to only cut part of the threads, then we would use a different tap to cut the bottom, it was slow but we finally got all tapped.

Next is the box to put it in.


Sent from my SAMSUNG-SM-G930A using Tapatalk
 

ChrisAttebery

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I made a BXA dial indicator holder today. I was inspired by @stioc and @Janderso and other designs I've seen in this thread. I designed it so that the indicator can be reversed on the block. That way I can put it on the toolpost in the facing orientation and used to indicate the face of something too.

I don't have a dovetail mill so I used a 3D function in Fusion 360 with a 1" x 1/16" T-slot cutter to cut the dovetail. I used .002" DOC so it took about 16 minutes just to shape the dovetails.
 

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ttabbal

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I finally got some shop time and got the slots cut. Using the DRO multi zero feature made setting each cut really fast. Then just back and forth... Easy to get into a rhythm. The roughing end mill is kind of fun to watch. It ate the 1018 like it wasn't there. 3/8 Niagara cobalt rougher, 1100 RPM, 0.150 DOC, 4 ipm. The chips were hot but not discolored and there was no chatter at all.

IMG_20200331_230410.jpg

Took the last 0.010 with a 6 flute carbide end mill climb milling. Really decent finish for 1018. Need to deburr and set up for the drilling and tapping.

IMG_20200331_230437.jpg
 
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