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Winner Home Grown Cutter Grinder

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Bill Gruby

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For you neophytes, the four jawed chuck is your best friend, not your enemy. It in my opinion is as versatile as they come. Once you have overcome the time barrier of chucking parts it's a piece of cake to use. This takes practice and there is more than one way to do it. I use a single key as opposed to the two key method some use. A set up like this one takes no longer than 30 or 40 seconds to start cutting. Look closely, one jaw is in opposite of the other three. This is common practice, hence the word versatile. That chuck very seldom leaves the spindle.

"Billy G"

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David S

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Bill,

Forty years ago when I got my lathe I was light on cash so got the 4 jaw independent. Never looked back. I am a two key guy. However never thought about reversing one jaw to handle something odd. Thank you for the great tip.

David
 

Walltoddj

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I've always used a 3 jaw or a collet for the work I did, but I do have a 4 jaw for my shop lathe it needs to come apart so I can take all the sharp edges off it. If you clamp on a part the jaws dig in due to the jaws never being deburred on assemble.

Todd
 

Bill Gruby

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Last shot today. Only the stylus and one set-screw before bolting the Tooth Rest down. Short answer for how it works. The stylus has the cutter tooth resting on it just behind the cutting edge. When you push forward and twist clockwise on the work head the cutters spiral will follow the rest and spiraling to grid the side of the cutter.

"Billy G"

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Bill Gruby

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The real deal Stylus will have a much more pronounced point on it. This set screw shows how it works (I hope). Pushing from left to right on the work head while turning it clockwise lets the cutting lip ride on the Stylus. This allows a perfect twist grind on the sides of the cutter being ground.

"Billy G"

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smallfly

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Re: Home Grown Cutter Grinder--ONE MORE QUES.?

Bill--been following this build since you began the build. just want to say thank you for sharing - your work is absolutely amazing and really shows what can be accomplished and what is meant by ''attention to detail''. one ques, although we have not seen any grinding stones as yet--it appears to me that no matter what shape or size of arbor is needed to mount the stones ----you will be able to mount the required arbor in the collet chuck on the end of the spindle . am i reading this correctly??
thanks again for sharing and particularly for all the pictures. re steve in mt.
 

Bill Gruby

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You are correct. This is why the ER20 collet was chosen. Any wheel shape that can be mounted can be used on this grinder. I will be able to reshape or regrind any tool you can come up with. The problem will never be the wheel, it will be how to hold the tool for grinding. Hope this is the answer you were looking for?

"Billy G"
 

smallfly

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Re: Home Grown Cutter Grinder-- SOME thoughts

BILL-- the collet holder leaves you with a myriad of options--that's cool planning. now when this grinder is all completed and the first tool is ground we will all step back and go ''that''s really cool''.but lest not forget- the one thing that really amazes me is the thought that went into this grinding tool even before, or as the first sketches were put on paper. there certainly was a lot of ''thought and planning '' preceding cutting the first pieces of metal. thanks again re steve in mt.
 

Bill Gruby

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Thank you Steve. I know I said I was done for the day but I was so close to having all the parts in place that I broke my own rule and continued after I was wore out. Everything is bolted down here. Now I am done.

"Billy G"

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chuckorlando

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So sweet. So you hold the end mill by hand?

I used the 4 jaw for the first time last week. Learn to stop chasing your own tail it aint to bad. Absolutely needed if you like em or not best I can tell. They can be intimidating at first but really simple in use.
 

Bill Gruby

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That was a joke, right. No you do not hold the end mill in your hand to grind it. Man I'm tired. At first with a four jaw the hard part is remembering which way to turn. Try two keys at once. Turn one in the other out. I only need one. Minus you back out, plus you turn in.

"Billy G"
 

chuckorlando

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No not a joke. But in my defense I did think it was a terrible way to sharpen one and I must really misunderstand what you have been building if you did have to. ahahaha. But I did have to sharpen and radius a end mill by hand in school this week. All we got is a angle grinder or surface grinder. This how I know it aint very precise method

Figuring out what way to go on the 4 jaw is the chasing of the tail I was talking bout. It took me a good 30min to get it right. Just when I get it close, I hit the wrong one and mess it all up.
 

Bill Gruby

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If you are reading on the minus side of the gage you need to go plus. This translated to moving that jaw out. Then all you need to do is to move the jaw opposite in to hold. It's as simple as that. If you use 2 keys you move both jaws at the same time watching the gage. Move till you are half the total distance and you are there. You will get thye hang of it, it takes time and practice.

The cutter in my hand was only to dhow how the lip rode the stylus, not how it's ground. It will all come into place when done.

"Billy G"
 

Bill Gruby

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Need light weight pulleys and can't find what I want so we make them. It's time to get the drive going.

"Billy G"

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george wilson

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Bill,if you want to sharpen small end mills,I might suggest you make a "finger" that is thin and flat,but rigid enough to stand the pressure of the grinding wheel. That round finger will be fine for large end mills,but way too fat for grinding,say,a 1/8" end mill. I'm not sure how small you can grind with the round finger,but my old Weldon has a flat finger that tapers up to a rounded tip. The base of the finger is thicker than the tip in both width and thickness. Probably a spring temper. I can do 1/16" end mills with it. The flat finger is thin enough to get into very small flutes.

Can you rock the cutter away from the wheel on the return trip? My Weldon also has that ability. It would be hard to keep the finger on the flute for the return trip if it were against the wheel.
 

Bill Gruby

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Two 3's and a 2 inch blank. 1:1 = 3400 RPM The 3" and 2" will yield 5100 RPM. Covered on all counts George.

"Billy G"

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dave2176

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Bill,

From where I sit those went from square to round pretty quick. How did you do that? I think I would still be mounting my rotary table. :lmao:

Thanks, Dave
 

Bill Gruby

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Turned them in the lathe using a threaded arbor. Cut the corners off with the band saw first.

"Billy G"
 

cjtoombs

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Bill, I must say that I admire your tenacity. It would take me years to get a project that size done, just because other, higher priority, stuff seems to come up all the time. This weekend I have to (finally) get my truck running and haul off the garbage, and then I need to get the garden ready to plant before I will be able to get back in the shop and try to make progress towards some of my goals in there. I usually keep more than one project going, so that when I'm waiting on parts for one I can work on the others, but progress can be agonizingly slow. It doesn't help that I'm impatient :). Great job on that grinder. I just got my K.O. Lee unit set up, and I am re-reading K.O. Lee's book on using it. It's quite a good reference for someone who has never sharpened tools before, it really gave me a good understanding of how it is done. Now just to brush up and start out on the big end mills.
 

ezduzit

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Bill, I must say that I admire your tenacity. It would take me years to get a project that size done, just because other, higher priority, stuff seems to come up all the time...
Yeah, well honed work ethic!
 

george wilson

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The grinder is looking beautiful,Bill. It will be a very useful addition to your shop. Very professional looking indeed!!
 
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Bill Gruby

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I am humbled at your compliment George. I consider you one of the best I have ever come across. Thank-you.

"Billy G"
 
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vapremac

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Bill ,

AMAZING !!!! Honestly I don't believe there are any words to fully compliment the work
you have performed !

When will you be ready for the cutters I'm going to be sending you ? LOL !

William
 

Bill Gruby

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I was supposed to be away today but the trip was canceled. The drive is getting closer. Just the grooves to go. I have another job that needs my immediate attention. I have a jig that needs final fitting for a gentleman. For now everything is OK.

"Billy G"

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DMS

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I really admire the attention you are paying to finishing. That's the part of the project where I usually run out of steam and thing "bah, it's good enough!". Looking fantastic Bill, but it's so pretty that it will be a shame to get it all covered in grinding dust ;)
 

Bill Gruby

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DMS --- When I near the end of a project, big or small. I too sometimes run out of steam. I immediately stop and just walk away. When I go back I see it almost ready and pick up where I left off. Sometimes I won't go back for a day or two. When I reach the point of no steam I know I am too tired to continue.

"Billy G"
 

ezduzit

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Yeah, you gotta avoid burnout. I take lots of breaks. :))
 

Bill Gruby

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There is one thing that really bothers me when I say, "Yup, that's good enough," it usually isn't and it will bother me till I fix it. :lmao::lmao::lmao:

"Billy G"
 

Tony Wells

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If I ever have to make the decision that "good enough" actually is, then that tells me it isn't. I guess I am too used to working to drawings with tolerances that are actually criteria for selling the part. If it's out of print, it's most likely scrap and will not be accepted by the customer. The company reputation is riding on furnishing parts that are in tolerance, and if it isn't, is surely isn't "good enough". My inner quest used to drive one of my bosses nuts. If I made a "finish" cut, and was not as close to nominal as I wanted, I'd cut it again. It took many years to realize that there are valid reasons to either leave well enough alone, or to deliberately restrict yourself to maximum material condition instead of going for nominal every time, no matter what.

For my own projects, I do whatever suits my mood. Sometimes I just try to see how close to perfect I can make it, others I consider function and give myself more tolerance. But, I always have a tolerance zone to work in. And I stay in it.
 

Bill Gruby

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Thank you everyone for the comments on that's good enough. For some, most hobby machinists I know, it actually is. For the professionals I still deal with, no, it's not -- ever good enough. What we are discussing here is what Andy refers to as Work Ethic. For myself, I have been doing it for so long dealing with close tolerances that I won't accept anything less. There is nothing really wrong with "That's good enough" if it is for your own use. Now, whichever you choose, have fun.

"Billy G"
 
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