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POTD- PROJECT OF THE DAY: What Did You Make In Your Shop Today?

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GoceKU

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No worries Robert, sometimes is hard for me to understand the meaning of a sentence, is it positive or negative because english is not my native language.
 

GoceKU

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Today temperatures dropped even lower so i'm staying out of the big garage this mean i could finish making improvements in the machine shop, i repair and prepared this light to be hang mounts ago also this shelf but only found time today to continue, you can also see how messy my workbench is, continuously rushing job after job no time to clean up.
I also had some plates burn out to make a belt pulley for that lawn mower engine i bought some time back, i wanted to match the factory hub that come off that engine, so i had a friend of my weld one of the plates to the pulley plate to get the thickness i need, he also welded up couple more spots on the edge that got cut accidentally.
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francist

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Not what I set out to do, but here it is anyway.

All I was going to do was see if I could finally get to making the missing collar for my Parker vise. It's been AWOL as long as I've owned the vise, and probably for as long as my boss owned it before me. Then I thought oh well, since I'm here I might as well clean the screw and give it some fresh grease. One thing led to another, and before I knew it the whole thing was in pieces and getting fifty years of gunk soaked off.

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As you might imagine, there's not a great deal of parts. I always knew the vise as dark green when it was in the boss's shop, and I'm sorry to say we didn't always treat it the best. The rather pathetic white frosting is overspray from our touch-up cans. When I started cleaning it though I found a paler, leaf-green underneath the dark green and ultimately a dark grey underneath that. The disassembly was also my first encounter with these coiled roll pins. I think the original brand is "Spirol", and I find them quite intriguing.

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Back to what started this, I did make a new collar. It was more complicated than I originally thought considering the sole purpose is to pull the jaw open when you back the screw off. I guess two purposes: I think the "wings" on either side are supposed to shield the screw from crap getting into the working parts. And how the factory managed to get the mounting screw 1/16" off-centre is beyond me, but they did so that's where I had to put mine too.

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And one final shot with new paint. I tried not to go overboard on polishing stuff, it still has to work for me, but I think it looks a bit better than before. Thanks for looking!

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-frank
 

savarin

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Savarin, do you have any other posts or writeups covering your broken tap eroder? What purpose does the kerosene bath serve?

This is not a posh project as I only cobbled it together with what was laying around.
It will NOT pass any kind of safety audit so be aware of what can go wrong.
I have re-wound the coil using my mates millihenry meter and the improvement in burn rate climbed as well.
I also reduced the diameter of the plunger chunk as I found the coil was restricting the plastic former and adding more friction. This also sped up the action and burn rate.
Its described in this link with the circuit diagram I used.
https://www.hobby-machinist.com/threads/keyed-washer-spacer.40953/
Do not leave it running unattended and check the coil temperature every 5 mins.
I use an infra red thermometer for this and let it cool before turning on again.
Water can be used instead of kero but then you have to worry about rust.
The burn MUST be done submerged else the dialectric fluid can ignite.
The little aquarium pump flushes the burn debris from the hole again speeding up the burn.
With all that said it is such a simple thing to make and has got me out of a hole (pun intended) many times so far.
 

Shootymacshootface

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I got these out of a truck's slack adjusters today. They are as hard as balls. I may attempt to make a knurling tool with them. I don't have one and I have never knurled anything in my life. Also, I do know that I could just buy one for like $15, but what fun would that be?
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GoceKU

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Today because of the cold got me thinking about the heater in the litle Lada, i took apart the heater weeks ago, and today i rig up a way to pressure it. And surprise surprise is leaking badly, because one of the bolts holding the valve has rotted out, the valve is stuck open and is not moving at all, those heater valves are always going bad, is a common fault, i had a used valve that also was stuck but i managed to get it moving, but the missing stud was a problem, tried soldering it but it did not worked, so i got me a stainless bolt and fished it thru and managed to get it tight, i also used new hi temp O rings and stainless nuts and spring washers, i used high strength good quality sealant, i also use some sealant on the outside more to show if there are new leaks, it is funny how russian made vehicle has so many common heater issues.
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JPMacG

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Finally finished the new counter-shaft pulley for my lathe. Started with a 6" diameter 3" tall chunk of 6061. Two months and 3 pails of swarf later this pulley appeared. The original 65 year old die cast Atlas pulley wobbled. The new machined pulley runs much smoother.

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PHPaul

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Taking apart a beseler shrink wrapper.lots of good material to use for projects.gonna have to do some goggling.got a 90v DC motor with controls.View attachment 282927
Oooooooo...I LOVE doing stuff like that.

Guy that rents the barn behind my property is a builder, has a 40 yard roll-off dumpster. I dumpster-dive at least once a week, always finding useful stuff. Most recently, a perfectly good set of halogen work lights, just needed some hardware replaced and a plug put on. They're now attached to the ceiling in the garage above my lathe.

Couple of weeks ago, I hauled out an ancient 200 amp breaker panel. Haven't ever seen the type of breaker that was in it, but scavenged a raft of 1/2" Romex clamps and the copper buss bars out of it.
 

BGHansen

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POTD was making a punch and die for knocking out 0.460” disks. The disks are a part of another project, but first things first. I use drill rod or O-1 for punches and dies. These would be used in my Roper Whitney #218 press and are 1.25” diameter for the die and 0.5” shank for the punch. First the die.

Started with a round that was slightly over 1.25”, faced and turned the OD to 1.25”. The die has a clearance countersunk hole in the bottom as the body is 5/8” thick, but the actually shearing surface is only about 0.200” thick. Center drilled, drilled a starter hole and finished with a ¾” drill bit. I set the drill bit in a ½” die and marked the depth on the drill bit with a paint marker. I didn’t show the operation, but also cut a relief groove in the middle for number punching later.

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Put a little chamfer on the outside and inside of the die, then cut off on the band saw.

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Flipped the O-1 and faced the band sawed side. Center drilled and drilled a through hole short of 0.460”. Faced the die to final thickness after the through hole was in.

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Next was putting a chamfer on the outside top surface of the die. Then bored the hole to size. The punch diameter sets the size of the hole/plug, so that would be 0.460” to make 0.460" disks. For steel, die/punch clearance should be 20% of the material thickness. So for 0.040” material, the clearance would be 0.008” (0.040” times 20%). The punch and die would actually be used on fiber material for this project, but I chose to make the die for 0.036” steel, so bored the hole to 0.467”.

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Next, put the die on a V-block and number punched a “460” on the relieved surface. Not a necessary step, but it makes for easy identification of the die.

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The punch was made from a length of ½” drill rod. That was cut on the band saw. The top of the punch goes into a receiver on the punch press which has a screw to keep the punch from rotating. Roper Whitney typically mills an angled cut on non-round punches and does a tapered cut on round ones (they’ll do an angled pass on the mill also). I set the compound angle to match a stock punch by running an indicator along the taper and adjusted the compound rest angle until the needle didn’t move. Mounted the punch in a collet and turned the taper.

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Flipped the blank to the working end and faced. Then turned the surface to 0.460” OD. The punch only goes through the die by about 0.200”, so turned the 0.460” diameter along ~3/4” of the surface. Then faced the punch leaving a “prick” at the middle. The prick is left so the punch more easily centers up on a center punched hole.

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The punch was pulled from the lathe and set on a V-block. Then a “460” was punched on the surface.

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Next was heat treating. I flame hardened the punch and die using an oxyacetylene torch. I have a Thermolyne 2025 electric furnace that can reach the 1500 F required for hardening, but it takes about 30 minutes to heat up. The torch gets them red hot in less than a minute. My oxyacetylene torch tanks are pretty small, noticed my acetylene tank went from 100 psi to 80 after this job. I recall paying about $90 the last time the tank was filled. So, next time I’ll sit and listen to the radio as the electric furnace heats up. It draws less than 2000W, or about $0.20 an hour which is a lot cheaper than the gas I used.

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Both punch and die were tempered to 460 F in the electric furnace. I loop a piece of wire on them so they’re easy to grab out of the furnace and dump in the oil bath.

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The punch and die work great. Anyone who’s seen some of my posts will correctly guess I’m working on another Erector set part. In this case, I’m stamping out disks from a fiber material to be used on the commutator of Erector set part# P58 motors. There’s a picture of one with a good commutator and one that was cooked by lots of use or a kid who ran the motor at a higher than the 15V max recommended by the factory.

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Thanks for looking.

Bruce
 
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lordbeezer

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I've been using propane for about 6 years now.had to buy tip for cutting torch special made for propane.15.00..same welding,brazing tips.works great for me..have saved a lot of money vs acetylene.20 pound cylinder lasts pretty good while.refill is close by.appx 14.00.works for me.
 

GoceKU

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Today i had very little free time but i plan it and used it very sparingly, started by removing the valve cover because it was leaking and the valves are noisy and surprise surprise, the valves have never been adjusted, and the government agency that had it before me did not change the oil regularly, not a big deal since is a Lada but the noisy timing chain that i adjusted couple weeks back was so bad it damaged the valve cover and looks like some one had welded it at the edge. Because of the caked dirty oil i decided to wash the valve cover before i do anything, so i started with mineral spirits in a pan but it wasn't cleaning it fast enough, so i gather all the air cleaners and other dirty covers in the engine bay and the valve cover and pressure wash them outside with a heavy duty engine degreaser, this took off the grime but might not been the smartest idea because by the time i was bring in them inside they had started to freeze in place.
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After seeing how bad the inside of the engine is i wonder how bad the cooling system is, so i started looking at the radiator drain and see there is no drain plug in place i poke it with a screwdriver and then fluid started coming out so the radiator is plagued so couple of hose clamps and two screws the radiator come out, it must weight 40kg, like is full with mud which probably is, plus the core is rusted out in the lower parts, i plan on upgrading the radiator, and changing the walter pump but this is looking like a complete system rebuild.
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Boswell

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GoceKU, did you realize how much work would be needed on the Nada when you bought it? I think it is great that you are saving this little vehicle from the scrap yard.
 

GoceKU

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GoceKU, did you realize how much work would be needed on the Nada when you bought it? I think it is great that you are saving this little vehicle from the scrap yard
I've know about 90% of its problems before i made the deal, only the badly done repairs come unexpected, that said i'm still under buget but when is all fix and done on the road it will cost me same as a Niva in poor to average condition.
 

BGHansen

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POTD was making a modified tip for the end of the squeeze bottle oiler for the ball oilers on my Grizzly lathe. The lathe came with an oiler, but frankly it doesn’t generate much pressure to force oil into the galleys. You push the ball out of the way with the tip and drizzle in what you can and hope gravity does the rest. My idea was to change the tip so it could push the ball out of the way and seal off against the brass surface of the ball oiler detail. The tip of the oil bottle has an M4x0.70 thread, so the new tip would be screwed on into place.

My Grizzly ball oilers have a brass insert about 0.250” in diameter with a 0.125” hole. I pushed down on the ball with the depth gauge portion of a Vernier caliper and was comfortable with a 0.020” deep press of the ball. Too shallow and the oil is restricted, too far and the ball might stick and/or the surface of the tip won’t seal against the brass insert.

My idea was to make the tip a shade under ¼” diameter with a “nose” on the end around 0.115” diameter and a #50 drilled hole up the middle. The nub on the tip would be 0.020” tall. After the lathe work was done, I’d go to the mill and cut away half (from the side) of the protruding tip. In use, the tip would push the ball down a max of 0.020” and a squeeze of the bottle would flow the oil through the #50 hole past the ball. The tip would more or less seal against the brass insert as long as it was held flat to the insert.

I started with a piece of 5/16” diameter 303 or 304 stainless. Faced the end, then cut the “nub” on the end with a parting tool to 0.115” diameter. Moved the parting tool down the work and cut the diameter to around 0.240” or a little smaller than the diameter of the brass insert. This dimension needs to be smaller than the diameter of the brass insert or the tip would bottom out on the surface around the insert if the brass was sub-flush. Then the protruding tip wouldn’t push the ball down and I wouldn’t get a decent seal.

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Next was center drilling and drilling a #50 hole where the oil would squeeze out. I chamfered the 5/16” to 0.240” area for appearance, not function.

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I used my Clausing lathe for this job. No DRO on this lathe so “old school” dial indicator work to face the “nub” on the end to 0.020” long. Put the parting tool at the base, set the magnet-backed indicator on the bed with the probe against the carriage. Adjusted to 0.000”, then moved the carriage toward the tail stock by 0.020” and parted.

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Nothing critical on the overall length of the screw-on nozzle, set the location for parting with a depth scale.

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Flipped the part and faced and center drilled the back side. Then drilled with the appropriate tap drill and tapped the M4 thread. Lastly, put a little chamfer on the back edge. Not functional, but relieves the sharp edge.

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The tip was mounted in a collet/collet block and set on the mill. Then milled away half of the tip from the side. The idea is the little “C” shaped end of the tip will push the ball out of the way, then the surface outside of the “C” seals against the ball oiler brass insert, the cut away area of the tip is the passage point for the oil to get past the ball and into the galley.

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It does work pretty well. In retrospect I’d make a few changes. First, I’d put a knurl on the outside of the new tip so it’s easier to screw on/off. Secondly, I’d be a little more careful screwing the cap on the oil bottle . . . Yup, busted the black plastic cap on the oil bottle, so all the work is for naught . . . At least I got to play in the shop . . .

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Thanks for looking.

Bruce
 

dave_r_1

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I have been searching the shop for my 7/16 hex key for my 4 jaw chuck, but after 2 days of looking I decided to make one... I used 1045 steel, it's file hard....
Of course, now you will find your hex key, probably right where you decide to store your new one in that "that's where this belongs" spot...
 

mmcmdl

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We made 400 lbs of glob today . 5 extruders were left on and have been pumping polymer since this afternoon . Guess who gets to cut the 5 dies and all the heater cords out of the " glob creatures " created . Someone will most likely " be let go " for this . :crush:
 

GoceKU

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Today i had the morning off so i decided to give my neighbors an early woke up, so i fire up the grunder and begun flatting down the welds, i put down some styrofoam to protect the panel and keep down the noise but it was still pretty loud. I did managed to get all the welds flat, as far as i think they need to go, i'll do the rest once i'm ready to apply body filler, i plan to do one more round of work once i'm back from work.
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Boswell

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We made 400 lbs of glob today
this happened on my 3D printer once. The nozzle clogged and it extruded PLA to make the print head one big glob. Took me hours of work to get it all cleaned out and back in service and that was only a few square inches of glob.
Sorry to hear about your mess, Any Pictures?
 

pontiac428

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Shars delivered my new cutter grinder yesterday. I'm on a grinding bender now, which is an obvious result. First to grind a set of textbook late bits. Here's a thread cutter (top) and a general purpose 35x20 tool. The other is a DE LH/RH rougher. I'm happy with the grinder so far.


(from mobile)
 

Cadillac

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I can say it I did make today only a hour or two. I made a shelf/cabinet for my SG wheels and tools. Just some 1x material I had laying around and some plexiglass. Shelves are all adjustable. Right now I have all my new wheels in there. I should have made it bigger as I have another 50 or so shaped and cupped wheels I’d like to store. It will do for now.
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BGHansen

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Shars delivered my new cutter grinder yesterday. I'm on a grinding bender now, which is an obvious result. First to grind a set of textbook late bits. Here's a thread cutter (top) and a general purpose 35x20 tool. The other is a DE LH/RH rougher. I'm happy with the grinder so far.


(from mobile)
Hi Pontiac428,

Bits look great. Which cutter/grinder did you pick up from Shars?

Thanks, Bruce
 

BGHansen

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POTD was adapting a new oil can for the ball oilers on my Grizzly G0709 lathe. I made a screw on tip for the oil bottle that came with the lathe, but I overtightened the cap and broke it . . .

Bought a pump-style can from Tractor Supply. Plan was to make a stainless steel tip to fit over the stock tip. The tip end would have a “C” on the end which would push the ball down and seal to the brass insert holding the ball.

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Started by chucking up a piece of ½” 304 stainless. Faced, center drilled and drilled a #50 hole. Then turned down to 3/8” (didn’t have 3/8” stainless on hand).

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Turned a portion of the end down to 0.230”. The end surface kissed up against the brass detail around the ball and needs to be under the diameter of the brass insert. If the end is larger than the brass insert, and the insert is sub-flush to the surface around it, the tip wouldn’t seal against the brass insert.

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Used a parting tool to cut the tip end down to 0.115”. The hole at the ball oiler is ~0.125”. Idea here is to make the tip so it will fit into the hole for the ball. Then cut a chamfer for a clean transition between the 0.230” diameter and the 0.375” diameter.

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Used a parting tool to cut the 0.115” diameter area to a length of 0.020”. This is the depth the ball will be pushed. Put a dial indicator on the lathe bed with the probe against the carriage. Zero’d out with the tool against the base of the 0.115” area, then moved the carriage toward the tail stock until the indicator read 0.020”. Then parted off the nozzle.

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Flipped the nozzle, faced, center drilled and drilled a hole the same size as the tip of the oil can nozzle. Turned the surface down a tad from 0.375” to 0.350”. I thought I might peen the back side of the nozzle over the oil can’s nozzle, a thinner wall thickness would make that easier to do.

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The oil can nozzle is 5/16” diameter which happens to be the same diameter as a #4 center drill. Plunged a #4 center drill and test fit the oil can’s nozzle.

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Mounted the nozzle in a collet and a square collet block and went to the mill. Removed half of the 0.115” tip so it was a “C”. Idea is the “C” will push the ball down and oil will flow through the removed half of the “C”.

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Picture just below shows how it works. I didn’t peen the new nozzle over the existing one as it was a near press fit as is. It works pretty well, but I was getting some oil leaking because of not holding the tip flat on the brass ball oiler insert. So, time for an engineering change.

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Chucked up the nozzle and turned a groove on the end for slipping an O-ring in place. The O-ring was a really good addition. It seals well enough that I see oil coming out of the opposite end of the oil galleys.

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Thanks for looking,

Bruce
 
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f350ca

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A couple of us are fixing up an old ice fishing shack. Won't be a safe fish in the lake.
Anyway, needed a wood stove, so built one today. Had some pipe, 12 3/4 od with a 1/4 inch wall, shouldn't burn through any time soon. Some REALLY rusty plate made up the rest. So rusty the plasma table had trouble with it, the pitted surface kept deflecting the arc resulting in a rough cut,
Attempted to brush the dust off my rusty stick welding skills, the metal was far to rusty for mig without hours of grinding. Can't remember the last time I had the old Miller stick machine going. Forgot how nice it was to weld with, think its 250 amp DC, the rod just never sticks with that much power behind it.
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Greg
 

savarin

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Chucked up the nozzle and turned a groove on the end for slipping an O-ring in place. The O-ring was a really good addition. It seals well enough that I see oil coming out of the opposite end of the oil galleys.

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Thanks for looking,

Bruce
Thank you Bruce, the answer I have been looking for but never thought of.
I can never hold the spout flat enough against the oiler to stop oil squirting out.
Todays job sorted.
 
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