POTD- PROJECT OF THE DAY: What Did You Make In Your Shop Today?

Janderso

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silverhawk

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I finally finished the chuck adapter for the dividing head. All I needed to do was part it off so it wasn't so long, then face it and clearance the thread. Yes, I chucked up a rod in the lathe chuck, then bore down on that rod with this dividing head chuck like the noogies we all endured in high school :





Then I could install it :



I'm excited! If my table is big enough and I can drop the tailstock, dividing head, and the gear blank, I'm ready to start cutting gears!
 

BGHansen

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POTD was making a couple of bushings for the suspension of a buddy's snowmobile. The suspension looks from a photo to be a large swing arm with a pair of torsion springs reacting between the frame and arm. My buddy enjoys his Old Milwaukee and Twinkies and needed to beef up the springs which have a much larger ID/OD. There are isolating bushings between the pivoting axle and the ID of the springs so there’s no metal to metal contact; new springs take larger bushings. He bought a couple of 3-D printed isolators that ran about $100 for the pair. That cut substantially into his Old Milwaukee and Twinkie budget, so asked if I could make something similar.


Buddy's snowmobile's suspension uses a couple of bushings to isolate the torsion springs from an axle.
1rearcomponents.jpg
s-l225.jpg


Pretty simple lathe job though I used different methods for each bushing. Kind of chicken and the egg thing; bore out the center then work the OD, or work the OD then bore out the center. Did the first one using the former method.

Faced, center drilled and drilled a 1” starter hole. The ID was something like 1.389” off the 3-D printed part, but he wanted a little extra clearance so bored to 1.400”. I’d typically stick as much material as possible into the chuck jaws but purposely left a gap for easier removal of swarf. The boring bar pushes everything towards the chuck so I left some room to pull the chips instead of using a ram rod to push them through the spindle or a hook to pull them from the opposite side. I was using Delrin which is really easy turning so wasn’t too worried about knocking the work out of the chuck. If it was steel or aluminum, I’d have pushed the work all the way into the chuck.


Faced and center drilled
20200208_123859.jpg

Drilled a clearance hole for boring
20200208_124829.jpg

Set the boring bar to make it through the stock ahead of time
20200208_125352.jpg

Boring the center hole to size
20200208_130648.jpg

20200208_132345.jpg



After boring to size, slid the work out of the chuck and supported the end with a bull-nose center. From there it was just turn to diameter.


Turing the OD while supporting the tail stock end with a bull-nose center
20200208_134755.jpg


There’s a taper on either end of the 3-D part. Chucked up the 3-D part and matched the face of the taper with a tool bit and made the cut on the new part. Then bored the countersunk the hole in the end.


Chucked up the 3-D printed part and rotated a tool bit to match the taper.
20200208_135012.jpg

Cutting the tapered end on the new part
20200208_135327.jpg

Parting off
20200208_135515.jpg

Boring the countersunk hole
20200208_140428.jpg


Pulled the work and faced the opposite end so each end was smooth. I didn’t show it but measured the overall length of the 3-D printed part with a height gauge on my surface plate. Pulled the faced part from the chuck and repeated the height check to get its overall length. No calculator needed to know how much to knock off the end when you have a DRO. Chucked up the work, touched the tool to the face and punched in the measured length. Then faced to the target number to match the length of the 3-D part.


Facing to overall length. Measured the new part length on a surface plate and dialed that length into the DRO. Then simply face to the target number.
20200208_141106.jpg



The opposite end has a longer taper, so matched that by sweeping along the part while adjusting the compound rest to set the angle.


Chucked up the 3-D printed part and moved the compound to match the taper.
20200208_141406.jpg

Cutting the taper on the new bushing
20200208_141845.jpg


I made the second one by first turning the OD’s, then bored the center hole. In retrospect, this was the better method as I could see a bit of run-out on the first part with the bull-nose center.



Finished bushing and one of the two $100 pair headed back to the seller. . .
20200209_194612.jpg


Thanks for looking,

Bruce
 
Last edited:

Shootymacshootface

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Very nice Bruce! May I ask exactly what the material is? I am planning a similar job on my 1978 Corvette. I'm thinking of using Delrin. Is that a suitable material to use for bushings?
 

tjb

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POTD was making a couple of bushings for the suspension of a buddy's snowmobile. The suspension looks from a photo to be a large swing arm with a pair of torsion springs reacting between the frame and arm. My buddy enjoys his Old Milwaukee and Twinkies and needed to beef up the springs which have a much larger ID/OD. There’s are isolating bushings between the pivoting axle and the ID of the springs so there’s no metal to metal contact; new springs take larger bushings. He bought a couple of 3-D printed isolators that ran about $100 for the pair. That cut substantially into his Old Milwaukee and Twinkie budget, so asked if I could make something similar.


Buddy's snowmobile's suspension uses a couple of bushing to isolate torsion springs from an axle.
View attachment 313501
View attachment 313502


Pretty simple lathe job though I used different methods for each bushing. Kind of chicken and the egg thing; bore out the center then work the OD, or work the OD then bore out the center. Did the first one using the former method.

Faced, center drilled and drilled a 1” starter hole. The ID was something like 1.389” off the 3-D printed part, but he wanted a little extra clearance so bored to 1.400”. I’d typically stick as much material as possible into the chuck jaws but purposely left a gap for easier removal of swarf. The boring bar pushes everything towards the chuck so I left some room to pull the chips instead of using a ram rod to push them through the spindle or a hook to pull them from the opposite side. I was using Delrin which is really easy turning so wasn’t too worried about knocking the work out of the chuck. If it was steel or aluminum, I’d have pushed the work all the way into the chuck.


Faced and center drilled
View attachment 313503

Drilled a clearance hole for boring
View attachment 313504

Set the boring bar to make it through the stock ahead of time
View attachment 313505

Boring the center hole to size
View attachment 313506

View attachment 313507



After boring to size, slide the work out of the chuck and supported the end with a bull-nose center. From there it was just turn to diameter.


Turing the OD while supporting the tail stock end with a bull-nose center
View attachment 313508


There’s a taper on either end of the 3-D part. Chucked up the 3-D part and matched the face of the taper with a tool bit and made the cut on the new part. Then bored the countersunk hole in the end.


Chucked up the 3-D printed part and rotated a tool bit to match the taper.
View attachment 313509

Cutting the tapered end on the new part
View attachment 313510

Parting off
View attachment 313511

Boring the countersunk hole
View attachment 313512


Pulled the work and faced the opposite end so each end was smooth. I didn’t show it but measured the overall length of the 3-D printed part with a height gauge on my surface plate. Pulled the faced part from the chuck and repeated the height check to get its overall length. No calculator needed to know how much to knock off the end when you have a DRO. Chucked up the work, touched the tool to the face and punched in the measured length. Then faced to the target number to match the length of the 3-D part.


Facing to overall length. Measured the new part length on a surface plate and dialed that length into the DRO. Then simply face to the target number.
View attachment 313513



The opposite end has a longer taper, so matched that by sweeping along the part while adjusting the compound rest to set the angle.


Chucked up the 3-D printed part and moved the compound to match the taper.
View attachment 313514

Cutting the taper on the new bushing
View attachment 313515


I made the second one by first turning the OD’s, then bored the center hole. In retrospect, this was the better method as I could see a bit of run-out on the first part with the bull-nose center.



Finished bushing and one of the two $100 pair headed back to the seller. . .
View attachment 313516


Thanks for looking,

Bruce
Typically nice work, Bruce. But of equal value is your informative and logical description of how you approached the project. I think I'm remembering correctly from one of your prior posts that your Dad was a shop teacher? I'm sure he's very proud.

Regards,
Terry
 

BGHansen

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Very nice Bruce! May I ask exactly what the material is? I am planning a similar job on my 1978 Corvette. I'm thinking of using Delrin. Is that a suitable material to use for bushings?
These are Delrin and might work on your Vette. On the snowmobile suspension, the springs are torsional so they tighten up or open up the coil when jouncing (winding tighter or looser). The wear/contact will be a squeezing action more than dragging across the surface if they were isolating compression springs. They are under-sized to the fully jounced spring ID. Of course, that's a static look at the use. You'd have to think running down a trail at 70 mph over bumps would move things a little differently than my buddy jumping up/down at a stop. The 3-D printed ones were polyethylene which is more flexible than Delrin, but not nearly as tough. I'm hoping for my buddy's sake that whoever engineered the 3-D printed ones did some actual testing on sleds to confirm PE works!

Bruce
 
Last edited:

BGHansen

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Typically nice work, Bruce. But of equal value is your informative and logical description of how you approached the project. I think I'm remembering correctly from one of your prior posts that your Dad was a shop teacher? I'm sure he's very proud.

Regards,
Terry
Thanks Terry. I can tend to get a little wordy, maybe watched too many Mr. Pete videos and caught something. . . This forum has all levels of experience on it, so might give a tip or technique to someone with less experience or get a better idea from someone with more.

Bruce
 

cathead

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I had a small piece of hardened H-13 tool about 3/4 inch long left over from the anvil project so decided to
try make something with it. I welded the piece to a chunk of mild steel and that went pretty well using
stick welding. My first thought was to make a slag hammer but I can see it might have other uses as well.
So a hammer it will be. The handle was part of the remains of an old axe handle so no investment other
than time. It was 30 below zero F this morning so I didn't have much else to do anyway. When done I blasted away on
a piece of mild steel like a wood pecker after some ants to see if it would crack or disintegrate. So far it is billy goat tuff.

Here's a photo: P1020661.JPG
Now I really don't know if it is worthy of a post but it will have some use down the road hopefully....

Interestingly, I did tap on the hardened H-13 anvil surface and it left a visible ding on it.
 

finsruskw

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Wrapped up my vise stop project from viewing a YouTube video.
None are perfect though but all are usable as is. Much more difficult than I figured it would be. The dro readout helped but the 4th digit kept distracting me and led to several mistakes and broken taps. Don't take much to bust a 4-40!!

Also wrapped up the drilling of holes in the brackets I am making and milled a couple lift bar ends for rear 3 point lift on a narrow frame 60-70's Cub Cadet. Stock mat'l was too thick for clearance on the ends.

DSCN7706.JPG DSCN7708.JPG
 

Shootymacshootface

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This is going to be the business end of the top die of my press brake build. It is a piece of 5/8" thick plow blade. My band saw barely scratched it, so I used a carbide end mill to square the edges and make it the finished length. I milled the uneven edge flat and then nodded the head to put a couple of 45's on it. I'm not sure exactly what this metal is but what I do know is that it is wear resistant, a bit brittle, yet drills easyish, and never use it for any welding projects. It will fail spectacularly.
20200213_173924.jpg
20200213_181503.jpg
The bungee cord it to help with vibrations. Carbide hates that.
 

cathead

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I made another tool for the hardy hole, not sure what it might be called. I can see it would work for stretching out pipe to make tapered pipes or stretch rings. Also I cleaned up an old forge tool with the name "Champion" stamped on it. It's been hanging behind the air compressor for a long time, completely ignored until today. If I look around a bit, I think there is another one around here somewhere...

P1020667.JPG
Also, I had an area on the anvil face that needed filling in. I used some 1/8 inch hard facing rod using the arc welder and was surprised how easy it
was to lay down.
 

GoceKU

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Today I needed to make one hydraulic compression fitting, started with a 1/2 brass rod and angle by angle form it. Last operation to do was to drill the centre that also went well and soon enough i was done. having carbide cutters with known angles sure made this job faster rather than moving the compound for every cut.
IMG_20200211_165305.jpg IMG_20200211_165255.jpg
 

GoceKU

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This is the sleeve on the hydraulic pipe that feeds a cylinder on a truck. This is a quick repair for a friend.
images590c0c4fecea486eaa7a7a60036af5ef.png images590c0c4fecea486eaa7a7a60036af5ef.png
 

Janderso

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rwm,
I\ve been using that exact boring bar in my qctp holder by stacking a piece of hss stock to get the tool at the right height.
Perfect design for this tool.
Well done! Thanks for the idea.
 

mmcmdl

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I'll get a pic of an easy to make tool for your small bars . Found a few yesterday I forgot about . :grin:
 

cathead

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Today I built the chipping hammer in the photo labeled "B" and did some modifications to hammers "A" and "C".

Hammer "A" is an old hammer made from some hot rolled material and was belled out on both ends from use.
I arc welded on a 1/4 inch Torx driver and ground it down to close to a point. Time will tell I guess for "Alpha" hammer.

That brings us to "B", the bravo hammer. It's awaiting it's hardened Torx tip but will wait a while and see how the tip on "A" fares.
On the chipping end I arc welded on a piece of unknown hardenable tool steel to be used for slag removal when welding.
I heated up the chipping end to white hot and cooled it in the snow outside the door. It has a pretty hard tip now.
Maybe I should call it Bruno!:grin: ...... or errrrr umm:rolleyes: Brino!:encourage:


Then there is the "C" hammer. That's Charlie. It was made a while back and I think made of cold roll material. Anyhow, the
pointy end was belled out from the usual abuse so welded on a piece cut off the blower shaft of an 8hp Ariens snow blower.
That stuff was really hard. I managed to sever a chunk with a cutoff blade with a 4.5 inch angle grinder, then welded on to the
narrow end and grind it to a point. The remainder I'm saving to eventually shape into a punch.

Sure I could have bought a chipping hammer at Menards but they didn't appeal to me at all...
P1020669.JPG
Well, that's about it for hammers for now. I need to move on to some other project, maybe start with cleaning up the
shop from all the metal grindings and saw dust.



EDIT: The arc welded tip on hammer "A" failed so I gas welded it on. I gave it a bit of a workout and using a torch to
weld on the tip is significantly stronger as one can get penetration all the way to the center. I knew that too but
was just too lazy I guess.
 
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rwm

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Black and Decker batteries don't last. I have tons of Dewalt batteries. How about a conversion?

1581977878041.png

I took the guts out of a BD battery and cut the bottom off a broken Dewalt drill. Then they collided at high speed and stuck together like that. It works really well.

Robert
 

GoceKU

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Today on my way back from skopje my car blow a power steering hose, it made a spectacular smoke cloud, almost caught fire and i had to drive it back without power steering when i got back i made me this a barbed fitting on my lathe and installed it, filed the system with fresh dexron 2 and its fixed. The funny thing is that my mechanic wanted couple hundred $ and said i need to wait a week for a new hose, pump and reservoir. I'm sure he'll find a sucker to take his money but won't be me.
IMG_20200216_154523_2.jpg IMG_20200216_154521.jpg
 

cathead

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I like your thinking, a good basic repair!


Today on my way back from skopje my car blow a power steering hose, it made a spectacular smoke cloud, almost caught fire and i had to drive it back without power steering when i got back i made me this a barbed fitting on my lathe and installed it, filed the system with fresh dexron 2 and its fixed. The funny thing is that my mechanic wanted couple hundred $ and said i need to wait a week for a new hose, pump and reservoir. I'm sure he'll find a sucker to take his money but won't be me.
View attachment 313934 View attachment 313933
 

francist

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A0499F2C-F6E3-4EDF-A354-EEEC4679E293.jpeg

More threading, still 2” - 24, and pushing the edge of the size envelope on the little 618. What with the bulky clamp setup on the faceplate and trying to keep tool extension to a reasonable amount I couldn’t swing the compound so had to thread using the cross-slide only. It worked ok though. I overshot the depth by just a hair so it’s a tad looser than my ideal, but still workable.
Thanks for looking!

-frank

15077150-11AA-4AB2-95F0-21251AA6C883.jpeg
 

NortonDommi

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Black and Decker batteries don't last. I have tons of Dewalt batteries. How about a conversion?

View attachment 313926

I took the guts out of a BD battery and cut the bottom off a broken Dewalt drill. Then they collided at high speed and stuck together like that. It works really well.

Robert
I watched a video a few weeks ago about the multi-adaptors available to use batteries from one brand on another brand.
Personally I'd like to see something like an ISO designation for battery packs for portable tools. That would really open up competition in the marketplace with hopefully companies with cutting edge technology for power storage making offer on a wide platform. Tool manufacturers could then concentrate 100% on just making the best skin they can.
It is called capitalism and in its truest form negates monopolies.
 

Downunder Bob

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A great idea, the big brands will resist it as much as they can. I would suspect they would even embed a chip or two in components so that they don't play well with other brands. It will of course work, because the ISO standard will make sure it does, but it will work within limits.

Many years ago when video cameras were quite new, there was a multitude of batteries even within a brand one battery would not fit another camera. Some enterprising person came out with a set of adaptor plates, I bought a set one time while in Singapore, gave me much more versatility.

The same thing should happen with cordless tools. A mate and I often work together but we have different brands of tools, which is great in one way, we never get our tools mixed up, but it's an absolute pain, in that we can't share batteries, and or chargers. Both our tool sets are fairly new so we don't have any dead bits yet with which to make our own conversions, but come the day, look out Makita and Milwaukee.
 
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