What Did You Buy Today?

Aukai

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I have a Syncrowave 250, never TIGed in my life, but I have it. :rolleyes:
 

Aukai

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LOL, brand new cooler, and Argon too. I just don't know the settings, pulses, cleaning,,,,nothing. I had a shop check it out, so I know it works. It's big though.
 

DavidR8

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LOL, brand new cooler, and Argon too. I just don't know the settings, pulses, cleaning,,,,nothing. I had a shop check it out, so I know it works. It's big though.
You're not helping ;)
 

NCjeeper

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I was hoping to be able to do both?
Then you will have to look for an ac/dc machine. Most basic machines are dc only. Ac takes more amps so buy as large as a machine as you can afford.The more controls for ac the better. At a minimum the machine should have ac balance and ac frequency controls
 

Ianagos

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Oct 14, 2014
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LOL, brand new cooler, and Argon too. I just don't know the settings, pulses, cleaning,,,,nothing. I had a shop check it out, so I know it works. It's big though.
I think you are a bit far from me but do you want to sell it?

But anyways I was looking at older miller syncrowave 250s. I was told they cannot do pulsing? Is that important? Would it cover stick welding aswell? All materials?
 

Aukai

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It does stick, this one has pulse, and cleaning, and LED numbers etc. I'm going to force myself to learn how to TIG when I get up the gumption :cautious:
It only took me a couple of years to get the nerve to be able to stand next to the lathe, and actually do something
 

francist

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My Criterion boring head arrived today.
Hey, it looks just like my less-than-expensive no-name one. Well, except that the index mark isn’t stamped crooked, the pieces look like they mate up really well, the numbers are stamped in accurately and cleanly, and it says Criterion on it. Asides from that, they’re identical! ;)

-frank
 

DavidR8

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Hey, it looks just like my less-than-expensive no-name one. Well, except that the index mark isn’t stamped crooked, the pieces look like they mate up really well, the numbers are stamped in accurately and cleanly, and it says Criterion on it. Asides from that, they’re identical! ;)

-frank
And they both make round-ish holes right?
 

francist

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Actually I have no complaints with mine. It is a little rough in places but it’s performed well enough for my requirements. And for all I know, the crooked stampings may just be my progressives acting up again....

-frank
 

DavidR8

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Actually I have no complaints with mine. It is a little rough in places but it’s performed well enough for my requirements. And for all I know, the crooked stampings may just be my progressives acting up again....

-frank
I couldn't resist the Criterion for the price. Glad I snapped it up before our dollar sank below the horizon...
 

DavidR8

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Bi11Hudson

Artificer00
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While this hasn't arrived yet, I wanted to share a woodworking machine part with you. The primary reason I purchased it is that it's U.S. made. I have had AMT machines in the far distant (ca1971) past. Although they are a fuzz small, they are fully functional. And since I like old iron, manual machines, this is a good fit. It will get used, although I bought it because it was U S made. I know it's woodworking, but it's an "old iron" American machine.
MortisingRig.jpg
 

GreatOldOne

R'lyeh Engineering Works
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Mar 20, 2014
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I bought a millimess aswell but yours looks a lot bigger? I think it has twice the range of mine too. Looks good they are great for surface plate work.
I’ll report back when it arrives... they’re pics clipped from the eBay listing. Another couple of purchases that bordem during lockdown accidentally made me buy:
387F3073-04D5-4AD9-97BF-A50D5A9A5878.jpeg 075CE752-D646-4E58-82DC-DE43764C4394.jpeg
mitutoyo digital depth gauge with one rod. Hoping my other rods from my other mitutoyo depth gauge will work with it,

New face shield. Purchased for use in the shop, but may come in handy for trips to the supermarket. I ’aint ‘fraid o no virus. ;)
FAB11F82-54C8-4C50-B6A4-A9D2BCAF11C4.jpeg
 

BGHansen

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Few shop additions. First is a Fowler brake caliper micrometer. Couldn't resist for $17 including shipping off eBay.

20200315_152301.jpg
20200315_152315.jpg


I have an upcoming project that involves cutting a helical gear. The two mating gears will meet at a 90, so need to cut the gear with the cutter at a 45 to the blank. My plan is to cut it on my Tormach 1100 using the 4th axis tipped at a 45. The CNC will move the X, Z and A (rotation) axis in synch. At least that's the plan. First step was picking up a Grizzly 7" x 10" tilting table. I'll make a base plate for the 4th axis, tip the plate to a 45 and tram it on the mill. Still waiting on the 0.7 mm Module gear cutter from an eBay seller in China. Hopefully they haven't developed a cough.

20200326_162943.jpg


Last was a set of thread triangles from HHIP. Somewhere around $45 including shipping. I have a set of thread wires and multiple sets of Shars screw pitch micrometers. The mics are my go to, but wanted to try the option of triangles on a digital set of mics.

20200326_162721.jpg

OK, in summary, not a fan of triangles. Probably my lack of dexterity and experience. I found them VERY awkward to position on the thread and rotate the micrometer. I'll fiddle a bit with the hole size on the rubber piece on the spindle which may help. Problem is the triangle wants to rotate (naturally) as the mic is adjusted. Might help to jam the ends into a Styrofoam peanut for stability like I do with thread wires.

Accuracy was also a problem. Probably operator error on my part as the triangles came with no instructions. The triangles have three different flats on the corners. Presumably for different coarseness of threads as the triangle faces should rest on the thread face, not the root of the thread.

I slipped the triangles onto the mic and ran the flats into each other, then zero'd the mic. Started with the sharpest edge.

20200326_165016.jpg

Used a stock 5/16"-18 cap screw and measured the pitch at 0.24705". The included pitch chart shows a 5/16"-18 thread at a range of 0.2752" - 0.2691" depending on the class of thread. I checked the measurement twice, mic is working fine.

20200326_165242.jpg

I moved to the middle of the road triangles, re-zero'd and remeasured. Got 0.25055" this time.

20200326_165355.jpg

Lastly, went with the coarsest flat and got 0.26095".

20200326_170001.jpg

I measured the same bolt with a Shars 0-1" mic and got 0.272" which is dead in the middle of the screw pitch range for a 5/16"-18 bolt.

20200326_165555.jpg


I'll do a little Google research on triangles as I can see their value. The measurement error is in my initial zero'ing of the triangles. I was zero'ing off the flats which will naturally give a different result for each coarseness as the flats of the triangle are the surface doing the measuring, not the flat on the edge. I guess for now I could zero the mic on a known thread and use the delta to zero to measure where I'm at. The screw pitch mic's are still #1 in my book. More to follow as I learn how to use the triangles.

Bruce
 

silverhawk

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Question. I need to double flare a stainless steel 3/8 tube (0.030 wall thickness). I have tried two flaring tools, the cheap one you can find on Amazon (two bars wing nutted together), and the pliers form. Neither works. What would you folks recommend for double flaring stainless?

joe
 

extropic

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(snip) OK, in summary, not a fan of triangles. (snip) More to follow as I learn how to use the triangles.
Bruce
As you've discovered, zeroing off the truncated edges is not correct. the planar surfaces of the triangles bear on the thread form. There is probably a "constant" value offset used, regardless of which face of the triangle the mike is bearing on. If your research doesn't yield that constant, you could figure it out yourself.
Reset your digital mic to normal zero (spindle on anvil) then measure the PD using the smallest truncated edge that clears the thread root. Record the measurement. Next, measure the same PD with your normal thread mic and subtract that measurement from the recorded (triangle) value. The difference should be the "constant". I would expect it to be a convenient number, like .200, .250 or .300 rather than .2793 or similar.


Edit: incorrect. See reply #3333 below.
 
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extropic

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Question. I need to double flare a stainless steel 3/8 tube (0.030 wall thickness). I have tried two flaring tools, the cheap one you can find on Amazon (two bars wing nutted together), and the pliers form. Neither works. What would you folks recommend for double flaring stainless?

joe
I'm assuming that the tube in question is seamless. If not, I suggest you get some seamless tube.
I wouldn't be afraid to heat the tube end to make it more malleable.
I found this video also. The author makes a point of saying "don't use cheap tools".
 

silverhawk

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I'm assuming that the tube in question is seamless. If not, I suggest you get some seamless tube.
I wouldn't be afraid to heat the tube end to make it more malleable.
I found this video also. The author makes a point of saying "don't use cheap tools".
I did watch that video. My first attempt was a tool very similar. Both seem to be unable to grip the tubing enough. I will heat it and see if that gives me enough. I might need to order some seamless now, too. Thanks!

joe
 

extropic

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I did watch that video. My first attempt was a tool very similar. Both seem to be unable to grip the tubing enough. I will heat it and see if that gives me enough. I might need to order some seamless now, too. Thanks!

joe
It seems like these folks are in the business and have a helpline (Mon-Fri).
They mention that their stainless tube is "double annealed". That might be the solution for your problem.
 
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