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mygoggie

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That's right. We take classes in it. Mere tradesmen can't properly bungle a job: they can't handle the math.

When it is really important to get things wrong, though, bring in a consultant with a PhD.
And when you want make absolutely sure it will never be built correctly or work correctly and overrun the budget, you bring in three academic engineering professors from the three top Universities ....
 

uncle harry

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And when you want make absolutely sure it will never be built correctly or work correctly and overrun the budget, you bring in three academic engineering professors from the three top Universities ....
Nothing beats the skill of a bean counter in running a corporation that relies on creative engineering solutions.
Even the best of the automotive designers can't compare
with their ability to obfuscate the ultimate results.
 

awander

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Those 0.110-50 screws and tap are likely a 6BA, which is 0.110 diameter, and 47.9TPI(don't ask me why).
 
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Andre

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Those 0.110-50 screws and tap are likely a 6BA, which is 0.110 diameter, and 47.9TPI(don't ask me why).
There were two hand taps in the jar of screws, and they were laser marked .110-50, not 6BA. Such an odd size.
 

markknx

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Andre, Very nice work on the Collet system. You sure you are 14? if you are and you stay with this you could quite possibly be the best Machinist/design enginer ever! You have both the skill and imagination needed. A little more knowlege and you will be better able to choose materials, calc. loads and all that. Consider the fact that there is a huge decline in the number of manual machinists right now do to all the CNC stuff out there, you could be carying the torch for the future of the manual machinist. One last thing, I have been working with metal for over 30 years Mostly in steel fab and erection. Only in the last few years have I started doing machine work in the sense of using a lathe and mill. but with all my background in metal working you just blew me away. Thanks for the great forum! still looking forward to seeing video of this thing working. Mark
 
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Andre

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Andre, Very nice work on the Collet system. You sure you are 14? if you are and you stay with this you could quite possibly be the best Machinist/design enginer ever! You have both the skill and imagination needed. A little more knowlege and you will be better able to choose materials, calc. loads and all that. Consider the fact that there is a huge decline in the number of manual machinists right now do to all the CNC stuff out there, you could be carying the torch for the future of the manual machinist. One last thing, I have been working with metal for over 30 years Mostly in steel fab and erection. Only in the last few years have I started doing machine work in the sense of using a lathe and mill. but with all my background in metal working you just blew me away. Thanks for the great forum! still looking forward to seeing video of this thing working. Mark
Thank you very much, Mark!
I actually just turned 15 two weeks ago.
I'll get a video when it's running, I promise :))
 
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Andre

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Looks like a new countersink is in order. You would have less burrs


I have single flute, helical triple flute, 6 flute, etc.
What post are you referring to that I said I had a dull countersink?
 

JimSimmons

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The Engineer puts it on paper, the Machinist makes it work. I always felt that part of a Machinists job was to make Engineers look good, they never proved me wrong. :rofl::rofl::rofl:

"Billy G"
You're almost right, the way it goes is: The engineer puts it on paper, the machinist makes it, and the mechanic makes it work.

Jim
 
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You're almost right, the way it goes is: The engineer puts it on paper, the machinist makes it, and the mechanic makes it work.

Jim
At the GM plant where I worked for 30 years, the Machinist was the Mechanic. :rofl::rofl::rofl:

"Billy G"
 

golfpin

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Unbelievable effort keep it up, we keep watching, how about a little pic of that 1900 henry lathe !!
Great work Golfpin RSA
 
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Andre

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Unbelievable effort keep it up, we keep watching, how about a little pic of that 1900 henry lathe !!
Great work Golfpin RSA
Thank you! I got a bit of a cold this week so it's adding to the procrastination! I really just have to make a new wooden collet closer knob and make the pulleys. You guys are gonna love how I make the pulleys, if they turn out as good as I imagine them being they should be beautiful. Hickory, with recessed curved spokes with a nice dark stain rubbed away then boiled linseed oil to give it a little shine. I'll try to get a slightly dirty/worn look in there too.

Just woodwork and collets left. Maybe add a clamp to the bottom of the base so I can clamp it to a bench or table? Although it looks great on the mantel above the fire place I do plan to use it to some extent.
 
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Andre

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At the GM plant where I worked for 30 years, the Machinist was the Mechanic. :rofl::rofl::rofl:

"Billy G"
At least it wasn't the opposite :biggrin:



Today's update!

Sorry it's been so long between updates, been working on a few other projects recently. There is a rumor around the shop a surface grinder might come in. Still in question.

To support the hand crank pulley, I had to make a bearing mounted shaft in the base of the lathe.

The bearings I used are KK0810 drawn cup needle bearings. They have no inner race, the inner race is actually the shaft they ride on. The shaft has larger bearing journals than specified in bearing specs, the bearing fits on a .314" shaft from specs, I made the shaft .3165" (Love my new tenths mike!) in diameter to reduce play.

This is not the exact shaft I used, I made one slightly different (bearing journals closer together and shaft extends further out to hold the pulley.) I had a different mounting scheme planned that would only need a 1/4" of shaft sickout, but I turned it down in favor for the new design.

This gives you an idea of what the shaft looks like, although it's not the one in the base. Bearings have a 8mm ID for size reference.

photo 2 (35).JPG

Bearing's on the journals.
photo 1 (34).JPG

I made the pulley out of Oak rather than Hickory. What I had on hand, so I used it. Laminated three thin sheets to make a plywood to keep it from warping over time. I have recessed the sides of the pulley, and will cut out most of it to create a curved spoked handwheel.

photo 4 (22).JPG

Here it is installed on the bearing'd shaft on the base. Rotates nice and free once the bearings have burnished the shaft's journals

photo 3 (28).JPG

It's coming together, still have some work to do on the pulley. Will also make a small 3 drawer "toolbox" out of the same oak that the lathe will sit on to give clearance for the handwheel.

Thanks for looking!

photo 2 (35).JPG photo 1 (34).JPG photo 4 (22).JPG photo 3 (28).JPG
 
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